18

The FAA JO 7350.9L - Location Identifiers contains complete lists under decode subsections organized alphabetically. Example:


14

The ‡ symbol in the A/FD specifies that the location observes daylight savings time. This is from the A/FD legend, which can be found online by going to the online digital A/FD and searching for an airport. The A/FD Legend link will then be at the top of the search results (unfortunately the link changes every cycle so I can't include an exact link). 6 ...


14

From page 5-1-7, contractions in the AIM: RVRT . . . . . . . . . RVR Touchdown The full list is: RVR . . . . . . . . . . Runway Visual Range RVRM . . . . . . . . RVR Midpoint RVRR . . . . . . . . . RVR Rollout RVRT . . . . . . . . . RVR Touchdown On some runways there are multiple RVR sensors and different points along the runway, and these ...


7

In addition to @JWalters's answer: L-2F, 3B is one group, and it refers to the "Enroute Low Chart Number(s) and Panel Identification",$^1$ that is: L-2F, and L-3B. Since you are aware of the L-2F, here's the L-3B: Source: skyvector.com $^1$ Interagency Air Committee (IAC) Specifications, IAC 8, faa.gov, § 3.1.5.2.7


7

The glossary I'm looking at (page 13 from the current South Central US Chart Supplement) says that that style of dashed line indicates Runway Centerline Lighting. So runways that have the dashed lines have lights on the runway. The complete chart supplements are available online from the FAA, and the glossary for each one is easily found about Page 13 for ...


6

Runway Visual Range - Touchdown From FAA 6560.10C Touchdown RVR VSs are located 0 feet to 2,500 feet (0 meters to 750 meters) from the runway threshold, normally behind the instrument landing system (ILS) glide slope (G/S) antenna, precision approach path indicator (PAPI), visual approach slope indicator (VASI), or microwave landing system (MLS) ...


4

Great question. The short answer to your question is "Full Time." Ultimately that Class D airspace will be incorporated into the LAX Class B, but there is a lot of red tape involved so step one was to add the Class D extensions, then it will be incorpoated into LAX Class B at a later date. Its a big deal, Title 14 CFR Part 71 had to be amended, ...


4

The airport charts usually contain the coordinates of all parking positions. The charts that are available from the FAA AIP (e.g. here for JFK) only contain a single ground chart with the airport diagram: These do not include the coordinates. But my Jeppesen charts contain coordinates for all parking positions. E.g. some gates at JFK: They can either be ...


4

According to the Chart Supplement (formerly the A/FD) legend: APP CON—Approach Control. The symbol ® indicates radar approach control And: DEP CON—Departure Control. The symbol ® indicates radar departure control. The FAA has different approach facilities classifications, a TRACON has radar but others don't. So you should see this symbol when ...


3

According to this legend for the A/FD, the symbol indicates that the approach/departure control has radar. This means that ATC can more accurately locate, track, and provide guidance to pilots.


3

A required rule in the airport/facility directory is required. It is a very good idea to check the AFD entry online (or on paper) before you fly to a new airport. It just takes a second and you can learn important things, such as "NO DEPS AFT 2230" or "PPR FOR TKOF ON RY 15. CTC FBO 970-920-2016" (Aspen).


2

Many non-towered airports have diagrams in the Chart Supplement, and there is an airport diagram for X26 but not for X59. The difference appears to be that X26 has instrument approaches but X59 doesn't. It looks to me like the airport diagrams are considered part of the terminal procedures. But I have to say that the FAA is as clear as mud on this. The ...


2

If an airport does not appear in the Chart Supplement, the only official information about it seems to be in the relevant Sectional Chart. In the case of Horseshoe Acres (FA24), the sectional shows that the longest (and only) hard-surface runway is "18", which means 1770 to 1869 feet. In the case of Brady Ranch (80FD), the sectional shows that the longest (...


2

I am based at KSQL, the TPA is 800 AGL. The A/FD er, excuse me, I mean the Chart Supplement, says "Helicopter TPA--806(800)" which seems like a typo; it's the TPA for fixed-wing also.


2

B19 is close to the Portland class C airspace, which starts at 1500 MSL, so a TPA of 995 MSL provides 500ft of vertical separation.


2

While the other answers are correct, the dash in RVR-T is missing. An overhaul (Interagency Air Cartographic Committee) done to the AFD makes it hard to get the up-to-date legend unless you're willing to download the full 300 MB document. But I managed to find just the guidelines: Chart Supplement IACC 8, dated 25 April 2016. 3.1.5.3.13.11 Runway Visual ...


2

This is a partial answer. I have not succeeded so far in finding an answer regarding the "3B". However, the "A" is addressed in the Chart Supplement. According to the front matter in the Chart Supplement, the "A" indicates that the airport is depicted on an Area Enroute Chart, in this case on the SFO Area chart. See the following quote from the Chart ...


1

AirNav shows the unusable areas for a VOR in the "Remarks" section at the bottom of a Navaid Information page. For example, Litchfield VOR/DME (LFD) in Michigan: DME UNUSBL 110-165 BYD 35 NM BLW 3000 FT. Of course AirNav has a great big disclaimer at the top of the page saying "not valid for navigation, flight planning, or for use in flight.&...


1

The US Chart Supplement will give you the necessary information you seek. The supplement lists a plethora of information on airports, airfields, heliports, NavAids, Flight Service Stations, ATC facilities, other aviation facilities, preferred routes, TEC routes, etc. You will find the useful and usability information for all of the NavAids listed in the ...


1

As I read it, the upper arch pointed to by Mach 1.0 represents the correction necessary at the different pressure altitudes when flying at Mach 1.0, while the lower arch pointed to by Mach 0.8 represent the correction necessary at those pressure altitudes when flying at Mach 0.8. i.e. the correction necessary at 30,000 feet at Mach 1.0 is roughly -30, while ...


1

Digital Aeronautical Flight Information File This database, commonly just called "DAFIF", is maintained by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Unfortunately, updates to this database are no longer published to public domain as of 2006. If you are not an authorized user, you can still use pre-2006 data from sources around the internet, which ...


1

Does anyone have a better idea about where to find the airport diagrams? For U.S. airports, consider using the AOPA Airport Directory. It's searchable by anyone without charge. I just checked, searching using X26 as the input string and then X59, and it has airport diagrams for both.


1

Try contacting the airport manager at those airports for this or more info: X59: 321-952-4590 X26: 772-228-7013 ForeFlight makes a basic airport diagram for X26 and for X59.


1

Or, alternatively, the answer is that the tower has the same (local) operating hours no matter if it's DST or not, i.e., it's always 9-5 local. However, since all hours are written in Zulu and the conversion to Zulu and local can change depending on if it's DST or not, this provides a quick shortcut to duplicating every entry's times. More than anything ...


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