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Hot answers tagged

25

No. Definitely try more than one CFI and ideally, more than one school. This is the smart choice and one I recommended regularly when I was an active flight school CFI. You're about to spend a ton of money - do the due diligence and spend more up front to make sure you don't waste time and money with someone whose teaching style or personality clashes with ...


17

My first flight instructor was kind of a jerk. You know the kind: First flight, "Let's take the plane for a SPIN", "How about a BREAKFAST ROLL?" After a few hours into my training, there was a scheduling conflict and I got a different instructor - a military pilot with many thousands of hours of flying time and a very different attitude. Professional. He ...


12

Buy a second logbook Here's one that costs $11 As a CFII who had exactly the same problem that you did, I can tell you that this is the easiest and simplest way to keep your simulator dual given and your airplane dual given separate. You just log all of your simulator time as if it was airplane time, but in a simulator. So, flying a sim that emulates a ...


12

As mentioned it's a good idea. You will be spending a lot of time with this person in a very confined space, not only should you trust their abilities but should at least get along with them. FWIW I would not consider this a waste of time as the hours will count towards your total and you will be learning new things while trying new instructors.


12

CFI candidates receive a spin training endorsement with no expiration date. According to AC 61-65E (the endorsement appendix), it should look like this: 46. Spin training: section 61.183(i)(1). I certify that (First name, MI, Last name) has received the required training of section 61.183(i). I have determined that he/she is competent in ...


11

I think many instructors is a good idea, since you see their different characteristics and each has their own sweet spot. I had at least 10 different instructors for my PPL, and learned a lot from the differences as well as their similarities.


8

The flight instructor is limited to give training in the category and class ratings of their pilot and instructor certificates, not by make and model. Per §61.193 and §61.195 the flight instructor is authorized to train and issue endorsements for a flight review so long she or he holds a pilot certificate and flight instructor certificate with the ...


8

The flight instructor certificates held at that point provide all the same privileges. This is not true. A ground instructor certificate is valid to give ground training for all aircraft... airplane, helicopter, glider, balloon, etc. A flight instructor must have those ratings on their certificate. Record keeping requirements also differ between the two ...


8

There is a contradiction in your question. You say both the student and instructor are logging PIC. This is fine, but the authority for this to happen depends on certain things. The instrument student logs PIC under 61.51(e)(1)(i) (1) A sport, recreational, private, commercial, or airline transport pilot may log pilot in command flight time for ...


8

A gold seal flight instructor is obtained by having a ground instructor certificate and within the previous 24 months have a pass/fail rate of 80% or above and recommending at least 10 applicants. It is a way for the FAA to recognize the best instructors in the industry. You do not get any special privileges with the gold seal. See AC 61-65 for more ...


7

First, if you haven't already go check out AOPA's Let's Go Flying site - specifically their page on how to pick a flight school/instructor. Some of the advice I'm going to give you is pretty much ripped right from them. For my two cents, if you're going for a career move (even a part-time side job type career), you want to optimize your training path - you ...


7

This question is pretty open ended. As a CFI myself, I really couldn’t assess whether you are ready to solo or not until I have flown with you and seen how you are handling the airplane on takeoff, landing, and in the traffic pattern. My general assessment standard for readiness to solo is to see the student exhibit solid knowledge and practical ...


7

No, many aircraft don't have them, like the Cherokee since it uses a gear warning horn. The horn signifies that the gear isn't down and you don't want to confuse that with the stall warning, so they don't have one. 23.207 says that an audible or visual indication is not required as long as the aircraft exhibits a "warning" 5 knots before the stall, in the ...


6

14 CFR 61.197 lists renewal requirements for flight instructors. If your CFI certificate is still valid (unexpired) than you can renew by any one of the following: Getting a new rating on your CFI certificate or re-taking a practical test for an existing rating on your CFI certificate (1) Passing a practical test for— (i) One of the ratings listed ...


6

No, you cannot provide instrument training for the issuance of an instrument rating, a type rating not limited to VFR, or the instrument training required for commercial pilot and airline transport pilot certificates Unless you hold (1) Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the flight instructor must hold an instrument rating ...


5

Yes. FAR 61.403. To be eligible for a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating you must: (a) Be at least 18 years old. (b) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand English. If you cannot read, speak, write, and understand English because of medical reasons, the FAA may place limits on your certificate as are ...


4

In general, a flight instructor must demonstrate sufficient knowledge so as to be able to provide the proper endorsements for his students. This is covered both in AC 61-65 and in the Flight Instructor Practical Test Standards Task M: Task M: Logbook Entries and Certificate Endorsements References: 14 CFR part 61, AC 61-65. Objective: To ...


4

You want to check the Activities box. The phrasing is a little weird, and it certainly doesn't line up with the regs (see 14 CFR §61.197), but that's what you want: (2) Submitting a completed and signed application with the FAA and satisfactorily completing one of the following renewal requirements— (i) A record of training students showing that, ...


4

You do not need to be a citizen to be a U.S. CFI. You need to have US ratings, so you would have to have all your German licenses/ratings converted, which takes some time. You have to be absolutely FLUENT in both spoken and written English. If you want to charge students money for your services, you have to have US residency or other work visa ...


4

It is false. 14 CFR §61.56(f) states: A person who holds a flight instructor certificate and who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily completed a renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions in §61.197 need not accomplish the one hour of ground training specified in paragraph (a) of ...


4

You will not need to repeat the hours. I flew with two different instructors during my training due to my first one heading off to the airlines and it was not an issue, as a matter of fact its pretty common. The FAA considers flight time, flight time. Once you logged the hours they are yours for the rest of your life. However the new instructor will most ...


3

The EASA requirements for a CFI ticket are: Over 18 yo Hold a Commercial Pilot License or a Private Pilot License with the CPL theory done. A minimum flight experience of 200 hours as a Pilot of which 150 will be as Pilot in Command Hold a Medical Certificate Class I or II in accordance with the license


3

I may be oversimplifying, but it looks to me like the main question here is just "can an instructor give a flight review without acting as PIC?". You've given one specific example of why the instructor can't act as PIC, but there could be others. The short answer is that as long as the pilot can legally act as PIC, the instructor doesn't have to. AOPA has a ...


3

This really depends on whether or not the authorized instructor and / or the pilot can legally be the pilot in command. By this I mean they are current with a flight review. Neither the student pilot nor the flight instructor need to be landing current as the purpose of the flight is a training flight. See the Kortokrax interpretation from the FAA. If ...


3

Without combing through the regulations, and the vast collection of LOI on the subject, I will give a general answer. For hire for the purposes of 91.409 applies to the carriage of persons. So the carriage of a student pilot, with a flight instructor is "for hire." The carriage of people receiving a scenic tour that they paid for, is "for hire." If you ...


3

The intent of the regulation lies at the beginning, in 61,93(a): §61.93 Solo cross-country flight requirements. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a student pilot must meet the requirements of this section before— (i) Conducting a solo cross-country flight, or any flight greater than 25 nautical miles ...


3

There is no harm trying out different instructors. Note that instructors have different strengths. Some may be better at teaching tailwheel and others at instruments. One problem is that you will not really be able to tell the difference between a good instructor and a better one in one flight, unless it is a personality issue. From a technical point of ...


3

Lets cover your specific questions first. Let's say someone has a helicopter license and wants to get their private pilot? Do they have to take a knowledge test? (it appears I was initially incorrect and the knowledge test does not need to be repeated as per RDP's answer below) According to FAR 61.63 you don't need to retake the knowledge test (...


3

One intuitive way to think about this is that the pitching motion of a rigid body occurs at its CG. At forward CG, the elevator, which pitches the aircraft up, indeed has a longer moment arm. On the other hand, however, the wing lift vector, which tends to pitch the aircraft down, also has a longer moment arm. The proportion of change of the wing lift moment ...


2

The requirements are in 14 CFR 141.35, Chief instructor qualifications. They're too long to quote here in full and the exact requirements depend on the type of instruction, but in summary: Hold a commercial or ATP certificate Hold a CFI certificate Pass knowledge and proficiency tests Meet minimum flight time requirements (depending on the type of ...


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