33

It's a King Katmai STOL mod for a Cessna 182. From https://www.avweb.com/ownership/king-katmai-mod-safe-stol/ The full King Katmai modification consists of the canard, 300-HP IO-550, choice of 82- or 86-inch, three-blade prop, speed mods/drag reduction fairings, wing extension, increased gross weight, heavy-duty landing gear, which includes Cleveland brakes,...


17

The C172S manual I have says to set the selector to left or right as part of the "securing airplane" checklist: Fuel Selector Valve -- LEFT or RIGHT to prevent cross feeding I was also taught to set it to right during my initial training. The idea is to prevent cross-contamination or leaks if one tank is compromised. Another reason is that if you ...


14

As far as I'm aware - and maybe a seaplane pilot could give a better answer - one of the big issues with ditching is judging your height above the water. If you stall it in, you might get it wrong and lose control completely. I checked the POH for a 182RG, which has a Vso of 39 KIAS and ditching speed of 60 KIAS. The ditching checklist gives descent rate as ...


12

This is somewhat restated and overlaps the other postings. Here are my thoughts on this: The ditching speed is to provide a safe approach speed. Depending upon the seas, you may not have the ability to judge your altitude, and this avoids stall/spin issues when ditching. The reality is that this type of complication to an unfortunate situation happens ...


11

First, the high school has no authority over the national airspace system so any 'permission' is meaningless, at least from the aviation point of view. I assume you want to coordinate with the school for timing and so on, but they can't approve or deny your flight, or tell you what altitude to fly at. (I'm ignoring any school disciplinary issues here, e.g. ...


11

This appears to be an Outside Air Temperature probe.


11

It's one half of a VOR receiver antenna. There will be a corresponding element on the otherside of the tail. The complete unit looks like this: Source Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with the the company from whom I borrowed the image - it was just a good image to illustrate the point.


10

Terry got it right! It’s a King Katmai STOL Kit. You can practically squeeze that thing into a parking lot!


7

For those who do not know -- the difference between a King Katmai and a Kenai is whether or not the plane includes the Wing-X STOL wing extensions, which add about 3' to the wingspan. AFAIK, everything else is configurable. I cannot tell from the picture whether or not the plane has the wing extensions, so the picture shows either a King Katmai with small ...


7

I tried to put this in as a comment to @Pondlife's answer, but ran out of room, thus this answer is an amplification of what he said. He is correct. Judging height above the water is a challenge, especially if you've not had experience doing that, which typically a ditching pilot will not have had. Wave action helps, but the problem there is that you may ...


6

Navigation or Position Lights are meant to be used at night-time and can be used when precipitation or weather in general deteriorates to the point where the lights will help you identify an aircraft's position, distance and orientation of the aircraft. During daylight operation, the use of navigation lights is not required as you can identify the shape of ...


6

The navigation lights are meant to give away the airplane's orientation (i.e. which direction it is travelling) at night. The red and green lights are small. Their purpose is to be observable from a long distance, which only requires a small light. For the same reason, the anti-collision red lights of tall structures are small as well. The landing lights (...


6

The rear seats of a Cessna 172 has headset jacks, I imagine the 182 has the same. You can see them in this picture: Image source You might also find them over the shoulder of rear passengers - as can be seen in this image (copyright attached) That links the rear-seat passengers to the same intercom you're used to from a front seat passenger.


5

The engine wouldn't fail. Avgas powered engines use 2 magneto systems which are independent of the battery and alternator, so if your alternator dies or you lose the electrical system it will run as if nothing happened. Starting it does require the battery and electrical system though to run the starter motor. Aviation engines with computerized ignition ...


5

This article gives a slightly dated (2002) overview of the engine upgrade options for a 182. There's no mention of auxiliary tanks being required, but it does note that for at least one option they're typically a good idea: The IO-550 engine is a guzzler and if you don't have long-range tanks, you'll need them. Indeed, you'll probably want to consider ...


4

You will get a change in engine speed doing a mag check, cycling the carburetor heat, if equipped, and cycling the propeller governor. You will also see a drop in oil pressure and a rise in manifold pressure when cycling the propeller governor as well. The reasons? Carburetor heat increases temperature of the mixture passing through the carburetor, ...


3

It depends on the airplane and what year was manufactured in. Generally though the answer is yes. Most modern general aviation airplanes include headset jacks at all passenger seats. Diamond aircraft have the plugs for all headset jacks on the aft section of the center console. Cessna has them on the wall liners of the airplane. Many modern airplanes ...


3

You can find this in the C182T Operating Handbook. Section 3 has information about what values should be considered a malfunction: HIGH VOLTS ANNUNCIATOR COMES ON OR M BAT AMPS MORE THAN 40 It also says that the M bus should be at least 20 volts in normal operation: The Main Battery supplies electrical power to the Main and Essential Buses until M ...


2

This all very much depends on the specific aircraft and how its set up but in general.. +Amps means that the system is charging (pushing current onto the batteries/across the ammeter reading the current in the system). An ammeter in a system is mainly to know if you are drawing from the batteries or pushing to them in other words indicating an alternator ...


2

If you leave the tank on dual and you put fuel in the right tank by the time you are ready to put fuel in the left tank some of the fuel will have flowed into the left tank. The right tank would have more pressure from the weight of the fuel than the emptier left tank and as any liquid will do it will try to balance between the tanks. You will end up with ...


2

I don't think so. The modification is done in accordance with AIR PLAINS STC SA00152WI, which has no mention of any auxiliary fuel tank in the 'parts installed' section. Also, the document says, Fuel flows by gravity from the wing tanks to a four position selector valve.. There is no mention of auxiliary fuel tank anywhere.


2

See the answers here. With that in mind, you can get waivers to get past these kinds of laws although that is up to the FAA NOT the high school's permission and frankly their permission means little if anything. The FAA's jurisdiction begins at 500ft in almost all areas and may be to the surface near an airport. While this is constantly up for debate in the ...


1

Need electricity for a Beacon Light. Big discussion having it on all the time here When to use beacon, anti-collision, strobe, logo, and navigation lights?


1

" the door would act as a parachute" No, the door acts like a giant wedge and the wind tries to push it closed, just like a car. In my Cessna Cardinal, which has a longer door than a 172 or 182, the door can only be pushed open about 4" at the back. Go driving, and see if you can push your car door open. Then try it on the highway. I would think a C182 ...


1

Not an aircraft owner here, but based on the AOPA article Tips on Buying Used Aircraft, the one thing that stands out is to negotiate a much lower price if the aircraft is close to its time between overhaul (TBO). [Let's say] you are purchasing a 1977 C-172N for \$40,000. The TBO for this aircraft is typically 2000 hours, and costs roughly \$20,000; or ...


1

The OP asks why the white "landing light" is more readily visible during the day than the red or green nav lights. The primary reason for the white light being more recognizable in this instance is that it is providing more photons than the green or red lights. The landing or taxi lights consume more power and produce more light than the nav lights. In ...


1

According to the Source: The bottom is for the icon in track up mode. For the North up mode, It Depends on the Heading. The fix icon should be placed on one of the 8 positions (up left, up right, up center, bottom left, bottom right, bottom center). For example, if the Heading is 45°, the fix icon is placed on the bottom left part of the screen.


1

So in summary, quick answers AFAIK to your questions on what the displays mean: Indications (in flight around 30 min after takeoff): M BUS E 28.0 VOLTS 28.0 Your Main (M) Bus voltage is 28.0 V. Your Essential (E) Bus voltage is 28.0 V. M BATT S +1.5 AMPS +0.3 Your Main (M) battery is slightly charging at 1.5 A. Your ...


1

My aircraft (M20M) fuel selector has left, right, off. My technique (which would apply to any aircraft that doesn't have dual tank feed) is to turn the fuel off when it is parked. I taxi on the lower tank, then switch to the fuller tank to do the runup and take-off on. That assures that both tanks feed fuel, and I'm always departing on the fullest tank.


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