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You can see, from this picture, that in straight and level flight, the drag D is equal to the thrust T. You can see, also, that the lift L is the same as the weight W. So you can easily calculate the value of thrust T, provided that you know the L/D of the whole aircraft for a given airspeed. If, for example, that L/D is 9 for an airspeed of 35 m/s (as in ...


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A good estimate for a personal aircraft thrust requirement would be more like 25% of aircraft weight, and remember, the "ton" of Cessna includes fuel and pilot too! So: 1 ton x 2000lb/ton x 1kg/2.2 lb = 909 kg Cessna 213 kg thrust/909 kg weight = 23.3 % thrust to weight ratio. But a lot depends what your plane design is. You can test thrust requirement ...


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The basic problem is that sideslip induces a cross flow over the fuselage that can increase the local negative AOA and flow disruptions beyond that already caused by the turbulence and downwash being generated by the flaps. The stabilizer surface on the "lee" side of this cross flow may get enough flow disruption to be felt in the elevator, maybe ...


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There could be several reasons for such recommendation, but specifically for C172, its POH explains it as follows (section 'Normal Landing'): Steep slips with flap settings greater than 20° can cause a slight tendency for the elevator to oscillate under certain combinations of airspeed, sideslip angle, and center of gravity loadings.


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No that's a really good question. Weight and balance calculations for flying are only concerned with the location and value of the variable weights - fuel, pax, baggage. The C of G of the "empty" aircraft with all those components is considered a single unchanging value for the purpose of establishing a starting point before loading, and is established just ...


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