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0

Easy - it's no different than the WHOLE WING exhibiting diminished response at low speeds! When you pull back on the yoke, that IS because you are getting diminished response from the wing. The ailerons likewise require more displacement for the same effect at low speeds compared to high speeds. If the student then can't grasp why the whole wing doesn't work ...


1

Any rudder input other than at zero bank angle will have a vertical component. As a result, higher the bank angle, stronger the effect. For example, during knife edge maneuver the aircraft is kept at level flight by purely using the rudder. In fact in that case rudder is basically acting as elevator. So, during forward slip some of the rudder input will act ...


-2

This is where going up with a qualified instructor, who is knowledgeable in 172s, is worth 1000 books. Firstly a forward slip, in a 172, is not severely banked. At approach speed, around 65 knots, rudder application will yaw the plane to the side, with opposite aileron used to steer the plane's ground track back and forth, maintaining a higher drag, ...


1

In the flight envelope you describe, the aileron response is affected by two factors: the change in lift from the movement is related to the speed of flight. As the speed reduces, the force diminishes, and, when the wing stalls, airflow over the aileron is substantially turbulent and no usable effect results from aileron movement. This applies equally to ...


3

The lift that is generated by an aileron at a fixed deflection (e.g. 5 degrees down) is proportional to the volume of air that is deflected downward per unit of time (e.g. per second). As speed is reduced the volume of air being deflected downward per unit time is reduced so the lift created by the aileron is also reduced and the aileron become less ...


0

why does aileron response decrease ... from slow flight up to stall. Yes, controls definitely get more sluggish slowing down from cruise speed to slow flight, due to the reduction of aerodynamic force on their area. From slow flight to stall, with ailerons, one must be aware of additional effects beyond reduction in airspeed. Ailerons work by moving one up ...


27

This is real easy, no explanation required: Tell your student to stick their hand out the window of the car driving 25mph in the city and rotate it like an aileron. Then have them do it on the freeway doing 60mph. Feel the difference? Did smaller movements produce larger effects at higher speeds? Practical examples are typically more effective at driving a ...


5

To make the answer as simple as possible, an aerofoil will increase lift in two ways, either by going faster or increasing the angle of attack. When the aileron moves up or down it’s changing the shape of the wing and either increasing or decreasing the angle of attack. So, if you fly fast just a small aileron deflection will produce the necessary lift to ...


5

Very simply, because the dynamic pressure drops as you slow down, making all aerodynamic controls more sluggish. Aileron works by locally increasing the lift of one outboard wing and decreasing the lift of the other, thereby creating a torque or rolling moment. For simplicity, let's think that for every degree of aileron deflection, there is an associated ...


25

Flaps out will reduce the ground run, but you're forgetting that they also increase drag. This is why you don't climb all the way to cruise altitude with flap extended. A 172 will climb better without flaps. With a take-off, you have to consider both the ground run and initial climb. After all, the take-off distance required is defined as the distance ...


1

I agree with the above answers in terms of the limitations related to engine. However I wanted to also add that it could be possible that going full throttle at a low altitude would cause the aircraft to go out of its structural flight envelope as well. So as much as being an engine related issue, it could also be due to structural considerations of the ...


31

These engines are not designed to run at maximum horsepower output all the time with a lean mixture. They are designed to cruise at 50-75% of their rated max power, and deal with that level of internal heat and friction over the long term. Even this is fairly hard compared to a car that runs at perhaps 20% of rated power when cruising at 60 mph. Running ...


8

Most Cessna 172s have fixed-pitch propellers. Designing a fixed-pitch prop always requires making some compromise between climb performance and cruise performance. Typically this means that at low altitude in horizontal flight, at full throttle the engine would exceed redline RPM, so you have to throttle back. At higher altitude the engine produces less ...


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