58

That is crazy. DON'T just rely on an person who's new to airplanes and only training is 5 minutes of showing them what to do, who may or may not react correctly when it springs to life, as the only thing preventing the plane from heading off somewhere while you try to dive clear. Don't. Do. It. Tie the tail. To something. Anything. Use the passenger and ...


57

Is it practically possible to do that? Is it okay in terms of weight, CG? Bikes (depending on make and model) are not all that heavy and in this picture they are more or less center mass and would most likely fall in the CG range. aerodynamics Again this depends on the bikes and the placement but with proper care you could be ok. Admittedly a bit ...


45

Firstly, to understand the answer, we need to understand that the Cessna 152's and 172's run a 4 Cylinder, Horizontally-opposed Engine. Each Cylinder has 2 spark plugs, one on the top side of the cylinder head, and one on the bottom side. The spark plug ignites the fuel/air mixture that has been sucked into the engine, and causes a controlled burn to push ...


42

There is an old saying "If you put a big enough engine on it, you can make anything fly." The Lockheed Starfighter was a classic example of that. With its short stubby wings it is basically a guided jet engine / missile. With small wings you have two issues. Obviously, the sheer lack of lift at low speeds, but also the lack of control surface area at ...


40

You can, but you have to live with the consequences. There are several things that can happen: Depending on the vertical gusts ahead, you might not even get close to v$_{NE}$. There is another speed limit for gusty weather called v$_B$, and exceeding this will run the risk of overstressing the wing structure. Going above v$_B$ will overstress the wings in a ...


39

Those are called "Lightening Holes". The name refers to the weight reduction brought about by removing part of the material—lightening—and should not be confused with anything to do with electrical discharge—lightning. From the FAA's AMT Airframe Handbook, in Chapter 4, page 4-82: Lightening holes are cut in rib sections, fuselage frames, and other ...


34

Just eyeballing your image, the CG looks OK, and it's possible to put that much weight into the interior of the plane just fine, so the weight is OK. The aerodynamics on the other hand - yeah, no. Imagine the bikes are not strapped down and you have to hold them in place - in a 120 MPH wind. That's a LOT of drag and the turbulence from it could easily ...


33

I will take this from a more general perspective. A Cessna 172 is part of the CS-23 category (in EASA land, see the equivalent Part 23 for FAA land). In the relevant document, point CS 23.143, we find the maximum forces a pilot might be required to exert on the control columns so that the aircraft can be certified. As the Cessna 172 is certified, we then ...


25

Consulting your handy POH (or one for a 172N that I Googled up) you'll find the fuel system diagram looks like the one below (click to enlarge - most high-wing gravity-fed fuel systems are similar). So there are a number of ways you could wind up with uneven fuel burn with this plumbing. The most common ones are: (Uncoordinated) Turns If you're flying lots ...


25

You're not wrong, but a fixed pitch two-blade prop has a pretty big advantage: it's cheap. Cheap to buy, cheap to install, cheap to maintain, cheap to repair. 172s are predominantly trainers in FBO fleets, and cheap is the winner. The efficiencies of a better prop are lost when you're just doing pattern work and short cross countries. Also, when you're not ...


24

Yes hand on throttle when starting, always, except on engines with fuel injection where you have to have it on the mixture because you start on idle cutoff and move it up as the engine catches. In any case, you shouldn't be reading checklist items during the start; you just learn what to do and do it so you can be in total control. Back to the checklist ...


22

You should check your POH but it may just be that the instructor in question was recently flying a lot of Pipers and it was force of [bad] habit. This POH for the 172S is in agreement with you. BEFORE LANDING .... Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH. You should consult the checklist in the POH that is with the airplane in question to be sure.


22

It depends on what you mean by "strength". In general, it is "not much". I've flown a lot of sims and also flown a real Cessna 172. It is true that most sim controllers (especially joysticks) require almost no effort to move at all. In that perspective, then yes, flying a real airplane takes some strength, especially if you compare the force required to ...


22

I’ll second John K’s answer. Do not attempt to hand prop an airplane without receiving professional instruction on how to do it safely. It is a real easy way to get seriously injured or killed, as this idiot almost found out. It should also involve two competently trained people, one to do the hand propping, and the ...


21

Nobody can definitively answer this for you except Cessna's 1965/1966 engineering team (the year they made the change), but there are two reasons I can think of: Because switches are cooler than Johnson bars; or Because everyone else is doing electric flaps. Much like with manual transmissions, some people just don't like the extra work of manual flaps, and ...


21

It is not common to call out the height above ground level when landing in a small aircraft. The main reason for this is that there simply is no way to measure it: A radio altimeter, which could directly measure the height, is not typically installed on a small aircraft. A pressure altimeter is not accurate enough. With the correct QNH reference pressure ...


18

You can exceed the never exceed speed $V_{NE}$, but doing so will most likely result in damage to the structure. From FAA handbook of pilot knowledge: $V_{NE}$ —the speed which should never be exceeded. If flight is attempted above this speed, structural damage or structural failure may result.


18

Provided you meet ALL of the requirements for utility category operation as spelled out in the POH (within W&B limits for the utility envelope, no aft passengers, empty baggage compartment, and anything else you may find in the Limitations and W&B sections of your POH) a Cessna 172 is approved for intentional spins, and may be used for spin training. ...


18

It's pretty much to limit imbalance when parked on a slope, and if the tanks are full, stop fuel from the high side tank from forcing fuel out of the low side tank's vent or seeping out the fuel cap if it isn't completely fluid tight. On the '68 Cardinal I used to own, the vents went straight to the wing tip on each tank's side. If parked on a side slope ...


17

The C172S manual I have says to set the selector to left or right as part of the "securing airplane" checklist: Fuel Selector Valve -- LEFT or RIGHT to prevent cross feeding I was also taught to set it to right during my initial training. The idea is to prevent cross-contamination or leaks if one tank is compromised. Another reason is that if you ...


17

The absolute ceiling, or the maximum height an aircraft can fly to, is usually not published; manufacturers usually use service ceiling as the benchmark. Service ceiling is the maximum altitude which the aircraft can attain flying in air at Standard Temperature and Pressure (29.92" Hg and 15° C at MSL) and still be able to climb at a rate of at least 100 ...


16

According to the amplified emergency procedures of the Cessna 172 Model N POH (emphasis added): After an engine failure in flight, the best glide speed shown in Figure 3-1 should be established as quickly as possible. The same POH lists 65 KIAS as the best-glide speed. Time spent away from best glide means less glide range. If increasing time, not glide ...


16

The minimum speed of a Cessna 152 is 43 knots while the maximum speed is 110 knots. If the wing area is reduced to one half of its original size, and we accelerate to twice the minimum speed, the induced drag is half as much as that of the original airplane at minimum speed (but still eight times higher than that of the original airplane at the same speed!). ...


15

The published Vx is in the clean condition (no flaps): 62. With the flaps down, for a short-field takeoff, Vx is 56. This is the same reason why the stall speed (bottom of the white arc) is lower with flaps than without (bottom of the green arc)


15

Short answer At low speed, near the stall, 40 KIAS (the low end of the white arc) and 48 KCAS (Vs0 in the POH) refer to the same actual speed. While there is a limited divergence (0 to 2%) between CAS and IAS at medium and high speed, this difference can be as much as 20% at low speed, when the aircraft pitch is large. Details In your question, you ...


15

It is of the opinion of the FAA that you should, according to the airplane flying handbook When activating the starter, the wheel brakes must be depressed and one hand is to be kept on the throttle to manage the initial starting engine speed This is merely a suggestion, there is no hard regulation on the books saying you should. Although if ...


14

The memory aid is PARE: POWER to idle AILERONS neutral RUDDER on the floor opposite the direction of spin ELEVATOR nose-down to break the stall You will want to read the full explanation in the Pilots Operating Handbook or POH for an understanding of the steps and why you need to take them. Commit the sequence above to memory and better yet get spin ...


14

$V_X$ published in the manual is $V_X$ for flaps up. $V_{X_{F10}}$ will be slower than $V_{X_{UP}}$. Most likely, the speed in the procedure is, or is very close to $V_{X_{F10}}$. $V_X$ (speed for angle of best climb) occurs where the excess thrust ($T$ - $D$) is the highest. Refer to the graph below: $D$ is Induced drag ($D_I$, varies with $\frac{1}{v^2}$)...


14

Almost everyone in the industry has opinions about this, sometimes with good reason. I know knowledgeable people with good arguments for why you should only turn the prop backwards, never turn the prop backwards, or why it doesn't matter either way. In any case, the issues of concern are primarily: The engine firing and rotating the propeller, or The dry ...


13

There are some good answers here. I would just like to add a few points: I don't like this idea of feeling for ground effect. I think this is unreliable, and will be different in different aircraft and conditions. I can only imagine the aircraft in a steeper than usual descent when I think of this, and not detecting ground effect because you have flown ...


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