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42

There is an old saying "If you put a big enough engine on it, you can make anything fly." The Lockheed Starfighter was a classic example of that. With its short stubby wings it is basically a guided jet engine / missile. With small wings you have two issues. Obviously, the sheer lack of lift at low speeds, but also the lack of control surface area at ...


25

Cessna 150s have a mechanical tachometer driven by a mechanical tach drive cable geared to the engine. The tach needle is moved by sensing spinning magnets driven by the tach cable. They do wear out over time and yours has reached the end of its life.


22

That is a fuseholder for the optional clock or optional Hobbs meter. The yellow wire probably should be connected to it but you should have a certified mechanic inspect it.


18

Myself I wouldn't be surprised at all to see 54 year old (from 1965) mechanical tachometer with 5000 hours on it starting to break down from all that age and vibration. You can get a new TSO compliant replacement unit for as little as 250 bucks... https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/inpages/mech_tachs.php ...so the broken one in the plane is ...


17

It appears like you have never disassembled a tachometer, now or as a kid. ;-) These old type meters consists of two disks near each other. One is driven to rotate by the cable coming in from the engine (or weels, if measuring the speed of a driving vehicle). The other disk is connected to the needle, and is spring-loaded, so it can't rotate freely. The ...


16

The minimum speed of a Cessna 152 is 43 knots while the maximum speed is 110 knots. If the wing area is reduced to one half of its original size, and we accelerate to twice the minimum speed, the induced drag is half as much as that of the original airplane at minimum speed (but still eight times higher than that of the original airplane at the same speed!). ...


13

First the standard disclaimer: If you're in the US and you're not a licensed A&P mechanic, take the plane to your mechanic. (If you're working with your mechanic on this job and helping out by removing the cover plates you've reached the point where it's time to go tap them on the shoulder and ask for help, because the steps to remove frozen screws can ...


12

Section 4 of the C152 POH lists the demonstrated crosswind component as 12KIAS. The 150 had a few variants so finding a published number is a bit more tricky. The Aerobat's are sometimes listed as 13KIAS, sometimes 15KIAS - but in general its the same sort of range as the 152(ish!). You will only ever see "demonstrated" next to these numbers, it is not the ...


9

This exact chain of symptoms happened to me on an automotive speedo - wobble, screech, increaing to extreme wobble, needle falling off, odo still working... exacerbated by low temperature in my case. This is due to old lubricant not having the correct viscosity due to hardening up from age. It was like this for many hours. I put a drop of oil in the right ...


9

Almost no heat gets to the engine. What hot air drifts through the heater SCAT hose might warm the exhaust muff a bit. Plus you have that fire hazard heater in the cabin. Get some of that aluminum flexible ducting used for clothes dryers and form the end to fit over the heater, and tape it on with aluminum speed tape. Set the heater on the ground to the ...


9

FAR Part 43.3 describes who may perform this kind of repair on an aircraft. I recommend you take the plane to such a person who will know exactly how to to perform this repair, and allow the aircraft to remain airworthy


9

This depends on if you modify the wing or not. If you are asking the question: If you chop 3/4 of each wing off will a plane still fly? The answer is more or less no. The wings simply won’t generate enough lift which is a factor of their size and shape. It may actually be possible that at a very high speed the nub wings would generate enough lift to ...


8

What you describe does not match any banner tow rig I am familiar with, and I have towed banners. What it sounds like is a magnetometer, which might be on a survey aircraft. They can be on a boom (stinger) or sometimes towed. I have seen them on Cessna 182, 210 and 208 aircraft, as tail mounted booms. Magnetometers are typically used for geophysical ...


7

The most likely cause of this problem is a lack of lubrication in the drive shaft for the tachometer. It might be fixed temporarily by disconnecting the tach drive shaft from the tach head, removing the drive shaft, lubing it, and forcing some oil or grease down the shaft. Or you could replace the entire drive cable assembly. Please note that this ...


6

No you don't have to "break in" flight instruments. When a TSO'ed instrument is new it will get an Acceptance Test Procedure (a functional test) from the factory done before it is released and it has to perform to specification. There is no such thing as a break in in service. That being said, sometimes parts get by the ATP and malfunction in service, so ...


6

You didn't say exactly what "allowed" means, e.g. do you mean approved by the manufacturer, or legal in a certain country? But if you're asking is it legal in the US (under FAA regulations), then the answer is yes. AOPA has a nice article on exactly this question, called Hand propping: A legal primer. It says: There is no specific FAA regulation that ...


4

Doing anything with sheet metal fastening systems is extremely delicate. First of all, I would strongly recommend not doing anything mechanical, like use metal scrapers, dremels, gouges or anything like that. The first step is to use a chemical paint stripper to remove excess paint. Use wood (like a toothpick) if any scraping is involved. Never use a ...


4

I think there are a couple reasons: 1) Weight, and 2) the Type Certificate. For #1, the original C-150 is roughly 100 lbs too heavy (in empty weight). That's a bit over a 10% reduction, which is huge in an all-aluminum design. Note that later models need even more weight removed (C-152 included). For #2, the C-150 is a CAR Part 3 type certificated design....


3

This won't work well as there's no way for the hot air to get from the cabin to the engine directly. The airplane is designed to prevent air getting from the engine bay to the cabin, and vice-versa. Cabin air is heated by exchanging heat with the engine exhaust system, the air is forced through that duct from the outside airflow over the cowling. So there ...


2

In flight training, I landed a Cessna 150 K in a 90 degree crosswind gusting to 55 knots. It was actually a smooth landing and when I settled her down, i was a foot off the centreline. I am not a wonder pilot by any stretch. The place I learned taught you to fly in the worst conditions, you came out of there as a bush pilot. You knew what you and the ...


2

Not an answer, but too long for a comment. A recent FAA email pointed out this interesting fact about what is commonly referred to as “Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind”. From the Airplane Flying Handbook p. 8-17. Maximum Safe Crosswind Velocities Before an airplane is type certificated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), it must be flight tested ...


1

Oleo struts and brakes used on light aircraft use MIL-H-5606H hydraulic fluid (the red stuff) as the internal damping agent/lubricant (be sure to check the manual anyway). It's a normal practice to clean the exposed chrome of the shock strut (it should be done with the tail held down to extend the strut all the way) with a clean cloth, then wiping it with a ...


1

Most C-150's had a Stewart Warner tachometer. They are considered disposable because they are assembled by crimping the front bezel on to the case. Also neither an A+P or an IA can work on an instrument. This is a job for a repair station with the correct rating. If you can find such a repair station, they will laugh at you. If you buy a high enough quality ...


1

Short answer: GA is effectively dead and the middle class killed it. That segment of the population went from enjoying aviation to deciding that small aircraft were capricious and dangerous little recreational vehicles and were scared of and wanted nothing to do with flying. And with that came the lawyers who nearly sued every GA manufacturer out of ...


1

Unless an operation is prohibited by regulation, the laws of physics, or the limitations section of the POH/AFM, it's not illegal. It might be stupid, but it's not illegal. There is an important distinction to be made here. The manufacturer can state that hand propping "is not recommended" but that is not a binding statement and hand propping is still ...


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