Hot answers tagged

20

Time All other things aside all commercial part 121 pilots have a finite end date, starting at 45 means you are going to be ~20 years behind the young guys. Since the FAA mandates retirement from part 121 operations at 65 you have 20 years left but let's look at that a bit more practically. Assuming you pay for all your own training and don't need to go the ...


20

You aren't crazy. People have started later than you and been successful. However, age does bring additional challenges, which one could argue is an ageist bias of sorts. The first is age itself. Part 121 carriers have a mandatory retirement age of 65. That puts a hard limit on a potential airline career in terms of seniority and wages. There is no hard ...


7

Some years ago (in the 80s) I tried out for ATC in Canada and took the preliminary screening test, which was a series of 25 diagrams representing radar displays with targets moving around different airways, crisscrossing each other in various directions, and you had to answer 2 questions for each diagram, whether or not targets at different speeds and ...


6

It is country specific In the US, as well as I can translate the legalese to English, your application must be accepted by the FAA before you turn 30. (I considered it myself, about a decade too late.) In Canada, you must be at least 18 years of age, but I couldn't find any readily available maximum. As another answer indicates, there may not be one. In ...


6

Aside from the career advice (there is in fact an increasingly desperate shortage of pilots as the baby boom wave retires - you should do it if you really want it, and if you you pay attention when travelling you will spot a surprising number of starting-late 50+ copilots on the Regionals), the biggest challenge is something that surprised me when I took a ...


4

The only situation in which a US-licensed pilot is subject to an age limit is part 121 scheduled airline service. Other than that there are no age limits, you just have to be able to pass your medical exam. However, you state that in your scenario the pilot will have to be able to fly cargo in and out of the US. That implies the pilot may have a foreign ...


3

In the USAF, it has, historically, been common for rated Navigators to be selected for pilot training, and possible, though less common, for young officers in other career tracks as well. That said, this process is competitive (so certainly not guaranteed for a particular individual), and dependent on the "needs of the service", so what is going on "now" ...


2

You can find the full database of FAA information at this link but more useful they offer some statistics here. As of 2018 there are 162,145 individuals that carry an ATP level ticket and 99,880 Commercial tickets out there. The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides some employment stats however their stuff only goes up to 2016. As of then they claim there ...


2

This can be difficult to answer, but I'll try from a US/FAA perspective. Military Service If you want to become a military pilot you cannot have any history of mental or psychological disorder This is from the perspective of starting out to become a military pilot. If you are already a military pilot and have some kind of mental/psychological issue that ...


2

I think that a lit bit technical knowledge is required to at least think of being an ATC because imagine a “mayday” situation. The ATC has to plan everything according to it and this is the point where technical knowledge comes really handy. Secondly it isn’t necessary that doing five tasks together at the same time makes you suitable for an ATC because ...


1

in the Netherlands, LVNL will not hire anyone over the age of 30 (this used to be 25 until some years ago). It's listed as the very first sentence on their website about how to get a job as a controller. There are also strict medical requirements basically the same as those for a PPL class medical. This is in no small part because there's a 5+ year ...


1

Navy and Air Force in the US regularly see migration between officer specialties. A friend who had a non-pilot Navy job, now flies patrol missions. A co-worker who had a logistics job (math major in college) with the Air Force, later put in for pilot training, and was accepted. He eventually was assigned to Beale and flew U-2s and became an instructor ...


1

This information doesn't easily exist, I'm sure insurance companies have some figures but they don't seem to be public. I'm just going to expand on Pondlife's answer with more data. In Australia the regulator CASA publishes all sorts of statistics, including the number of medical certificates issued and refused (page 164). Australian professional pilots ...


1

(US-based answer) The problem with answering your question is that it isn't all clear what "losing a medical" actually means. If a pilot is denied a medical, the FAA will obviously know and you could probably get that data from them somehow, even if it takes an FOIA request. But what if you just decide not to renew because you know you'd fail? For all the ...


1

The FAA doesn't care which service an applicant was in. They only care about direct ATC experience. From a recent FAA job announcement for experienced controllers (closed Dec 9, 2018): THIS ANNOUNCEMENT IS FOR CANDIDATES WHO HAVE MAINTAINED AT LEAST 52 CONSECUTIVE WEEKS OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL EXPERIENCE INVOLVING THE FULL-TIME ACTIVE SEPARATION OF AIR ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible