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67

You were born 100 years too late. In order to be an improvement over existing designs, airplanes become ever more complex and every detail is optimised over years and years. The days when someone like Robert Hall or Kurt Tank would design and test fly their designs are long gone. The best you can do is to design an experimental aircraft and maybe market it ...


35

Rather than being concerned with titles, let's take a look what's involved in designing/analyzing/certifying a modern airplane: External aerodynamics: deduce the aerodynamic characteristics and propose changes in outer model line as required to achieve the desired characteristics. Skills: applied mathematics, aeronautics engineering. Flight science: deduce ...


15

I'll address the question in the title: how to get into actually designing an entire aircraft. Not every component, but making the major, visible decisions. Such jobs do exist, but they aren't easy to get. Design is an iterative process that goes continuously more in-depth on every step. It begins with a requirements document, which are responded to with ...


6

There are no specific high school or college academic requirements specified for pilots in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. However, basic knowledge in math and the physical sciences is important, and will greatly improve your understanding of subjects that are taught in ground school so that you can successfully pass required written and oral exams. ...


4

Not for modern airplanes. Let's look at an example. Take a small airplane, the Cessna Skyhawk. Even on an airplane that small, Cessna doesn't make all of the components itself. For example, the engine is made by Lycoming, the avionics are provided by Garmin, the propeller is made by McCauley etc. There isn't a position at Cessna involved in the design of all ...


3

I would say that an airline will avoid hiring an applicant that is not assessed as eventual "captain material". It's not the maximum return on the airline's investment. An applicant would never say in an interview that they only wanted to be a lifelong FO, except under special circumstances like an older hire who is likely to retire before meeting ...


3

Probably the last guy that was able to do that successfully was Burt Rutan. A person whose history is worth studying if you are interested in this sort of thing. Designing a complete aircraft from scratch today is far less likely then designing a complete car.


3

If to see an aircraft as a vehicle that is able to fly by gaining support from the air, the definition may cover also drones of all kinds. Then a realistic way would be to create a startup that designs a drone. For instance, I know a Swiss startup that designed unusual VTOL fixed wing drone offering much more endurance than its helicopter-like competitors. ...


2

I am pilot and currently work as a flight instructor in Australia In order to become an airline pilot you need to get your initial licenses in light aircraft. No one learns to fly in a big jet. There are two main pathways to get a job in an airline Self funded and/or university training option: You start training at a flight school to obtain your commercial ...


2

While the question is certainly subjective, I wanted to help you out as much as possible. I spoke to a friend who works as an electrical engineer at NASA and asked him your question. Based on his advice and some of my own research on your behalf, the most direct route would be to pursue an aerospace engineering degree in a good university program - CIT, MIT, ...


2

It's one of those things about the flying game that the actual details of previous education and experience outside of aviation count for relatively little, other than what they may indicate about someone's personality, worldview and leadership potential going forward. This is because the knowledge base and skill set are unique to the trade. I used to know ...


1

Do you have to take science? No, possibly not. Should you? Absolutely yes! Without a basic understanding of science, it will be very difficult to understand the basics of flight as they are all about the balancing of forces (which is physics). Fuel management, air density and atmospherics are easier with a knowledge of physics and chemistry and navigation ...


1

There's no likely career path, if you have serious enough medical problems they will probably prevent you from getting a job in aviation flying anything commercially. However, that's a separate question, you'd want to talk to an aviation medical examiner to find out what avenues are open to you. There is a path to flying military style jets as a civilian ...


1

At one step remove, technical computing. Over the four years I in technical computing at BAE SYSTEMS, I was helping design: Operational research simulation Observe Orient Decide Act loops Sensor integration Genetic design of wing shape Simulated annealing of processor allocation Structural integrity modelling Radar cross-section estimation Autonomous air ...


1

PPL - PRIVATE PILOT CERTIFICATE This is the lowest grade of pilot certificate which allows a user to operate an aircraft in all areas of the National Airspace System with limited provisions. Along with a Third Class Medical Certificate, it allows the holder to act as PIC in all categories and classes of aircraft, or on type rated large or turbojet powered ...


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