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1

Is there a real danger? Yes, there is. A private jet pilot was killed when hit by a door at Kittilä, Finland, 2018. The aircraft had arrived in Kittilä two days before and was about to take off for a positioning flight without passengers. During these two days the aircraft was parked outside. Considering the season, the weather was usual. On the ...


14

It is there to prevent "violent door openings": (figure 1b source) In some abnormal cases, outflow valves can remain closed, when the aircraft is on the ground, causing the air pressure in the cabin to be higher than the ambient air pressure outside the aircraft (fig.1b). In this case, there is a risk that an aircraft door could violently open ...


6

No nothing like that. If there was what is usually called "explosive" decompression, like a window blowing out, there will be a loud BANG, maybe a short howling sound as air rushes out, possibly fog will form in the cabin, and you will feel the air pressure in your head trying to get out until it equalizes. It might make your ear drums hurt until it does. ...


3

Apart from the practical implications, aircraft pressurise their cabins with the bleed air coming from the jet engines. This air is compressed by the engines and used for the combustions process. So there are no seperate air compressors. If you want to have the aircraft compressed at the ground, you will need to either keep the engines running or add ...


2

Besides the fact that this is unlikely to be kind on passengers to overpressurize, the passenger doors and the jetways aren't the only portal into the pressurized space. The luggage going in the belly and the servicing carts coming in the rear would also have to be accommodated. Trying to load and unload cargo through an airlock would slow things down a ...


3

Below around 8000' MSL aircraft pressurization is roughly equal to the outside air pressure. Since most airports are below this elevation, there is no pressure differential once the airplane is on the ground, therefore no need or even possibility for an airlock. It takes very little bleed air to pressurize when airborne so there isn't a significant cost in ...


17

I believe there are quite a few misconceptions here: When an aircraft is "pressurised", it means that at higher altitudes, the pressure inside the aircraft is higher than the pressure outside. At lower altitudes, the pressure is exactly the same inside and out. Originally, aircraft weren't pressurised, and at higher altitudes the low pressure is a problem ...


4

The only reason planes are pressurized is to allow the passengers the ability to breathe at flight altitude as if they were on the ground. If the plane is still or already on the ground, there would be no purpose in pressurizing it. Most metal bodied aircraft pressurize their cabins to about 8000 feet cabin pressure altitude. If the outside air is at a ...


2

Tip: accident investigation reports cover the system controls related to an accident. The one in question is here (ntsb.gov), from which: According to the March 20, 1994, edition of FedEx’s DC-10 Flight Manual, page 8-2-2/8-2-3: Cabin pressure is controlled and maintained by metered release of conditioned air in either an AUTO, SEMI-AUTO, or ...


1

At cruising altitude (say 35,000 feet), the difference in air pressure between the inside and outside of a comfortably pressurized aircraft is about 7 psi. If you imagine a hole just large enough for a person to squeeze through - perhaps 10 inches x 14 inches, that's 140 square inches; multiply that by 7 psi and you get 980 pounds of force - close to half a ...


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