100

There certainly are; it's called "Business Class" and you'll find such areas with seats that recline into what are essentially beds on most long-haul aircraft. However, you simply can't fit as many people on board when they use up so much room, so airlines have to charge much more for these to make it economically viable. It's often twice the price of a ...


91

The cabin interior is curved to accommodate, among other things, the brackets holding the upper deck floor beams. These brackets are a structural feature that transfers the weight of the upper deck to the fuselage with considerably less reinforcement that a straight T-joint. The bracket acts as a small truss element, creating a triangle with the deck and ...


60

They just dont really fly them any more: All things considered history has a big impact on this. 13 hours is by comparison fairly short when it comes to long distance flying historically speaking. Early aircraft that flew much slower than todays jets were built more like trains than the modern planes we have now. They had dining areas, berths, saloons, and ...


57

At cruising altitude there is between 4 and 8 tons of pressure acting on the inside of the door. There aren't too many passengers capable of exerting that much force on the handle (and even fewer handles that won't just snap off). Latch type doors have interlocks or over-center latches that prevent operation with a pressurized cabin. It's theoretically ...


56

Note that the windows are a safety feature: You need to see outside in case of emergency, e.g. to know which side of the plane is surrounded by flames, or how deep in the water you are. This is actually the reason why the inner lighting matches the outside conditions for take-off and landing and the window shades have to be open. Even worse, the potential ...


53

I have flown in sleeper class with British Airways flying overnight from Toronto to LHR. It was an expensive luxury which started out great, but when fully reclined the bed is not exactly flat and, if you sleep on your side, there are definite pressure points on the hips and knees. That made it rather uncomfortable after a few hours. Rather than arriving ...


51

Direct answer This phenomenon is the condensation of air humidity into water droplets due to a large drop in temperature caused by air conditioning. It is similar to fog which appears when humid air is close to a cooler ground. It is also similar to dew which is fog directly on the ground. Fog and dew appear when air temperature is lowered below its dew ...


46

On the other hand, fuselage on an airliner is most of time bullet shaped. No, it is not. A “bullet shape” has a flat end, which is where most of the drag is generated (at subsonic speeds). But that shape is never used on flying vehicles except on rockets where the end is occupied by the rocket engines. Instead, airliners always have a tapered “boat” tail, ...


45

There are such a thing as "Quick Change" aircraft, allowing entire 'pallets' of chairs to be exchanged for cargo. Image courtesy of canalblog.com Image courtesy of airliner.net Nice film to show the process. Military transport aircraft can also be fitted out with stretchers or seats, or whatever other combo of stuff you want. To the best of my ...


40

If there is a problem on-board and the crew is unsure about the condition of the aircraft, the triangle indicates what window should be used to inspect flaps, slats or engines or look out for icing. This saves important time in case of an emergency, as the crew doesn't has to search the right window to look out. For example if there is a failure of the ...


39

This is the forward Master Call Light Panel installed in the ceiling of the cabin. A second one is located aft. These panels exist on all large aircraft for the cabin crew members to be alerted without staying at their seats. The number and color of lights vary according to customer requested options for the cabin. Some lights may be duplicated to indicate ...


39

Consider this photo of the cross-section of the A380 and the illustration below. You can see the cargo deck on the bottom, the lower deck (where you sat) in the middle, and the upper deck on the top. All have curved walls because the entire fuselage is curved. Straight walls would waste the space between the walls and the curved sides of the aircraft, and no ...


38

Because in the US (where Boeings are made) it's required by law. 14 CFR 25.853(g) says: (g) Regardless of whether smoking is allowed in any other part of the airplane, lavatories must have self-contained, removable ashtrays located conspicuously on or near the entry side of each lavatory door, except that one ashtray may serve more than one lavatory ...


37

Problem #1: What gets displayed on the screen? While I'm aware of Emirates' recent 'virtual windows,' there is a big problem with this idea in general: what should actually be displayed there depends on the location of the viewer relative to the window! This is not an easy problem to solve - and it's effectively impossible to solve for multiple viewers ...


36

First, some airliners do use it - the Bombardier Q400 uses a NVS (Noise and Vibration Suppression) system to reduce cabin noise. Basically, it uses devices called Active Tuned Vibration Absorbers (ATVAs) mounted on the fuselage frames to 'cancel' the vibrations from propellers and outside noise, thereby quieting the cabin. However, there are some issues ...


35

See Page 9 of TCDS A.064 ANNEX - Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 - Special Conditions TCDS A.064 ANNEX - Airbus A318, A319, A320, A321 - Special Conditions EQUIVALENT SAFETY FINDING E-2107: Passenger Extension to 180 APPLICABILITY: A320 REQUIREMENTS: JAR 25.807 ADVISORY MATERIAL: N/A ...


34

Emirates Airlines have recently launched their new First Class with a similar concept. It is only available in First Class and I doubt it has much to do with the structural implications as of now, but that could change if the idea catches on. The virtual windows are a feature on the otherwise windowless cabin suites along the middle aisle, and project a ...


32

On the Boeing 787, the mechanical window shades have been replaced with glass panes which can be made more opaque or transparent by applying electric current to them. (source) The passengers can control their own window's opacity through buttons, but the cabin purser can also control them centrally.


28

In the early years of the jet age, which followed closely on the introduction of pressurized hulls, there was much fear of stresses specifically in the area of the window openings due to the loss of two DeHavilland Comets. Subsequent Comet hulls had different shaped, rounded, smaller windows and that trend continued in other pressurized, typically jet-...


28

Adding to @Airsick's answer there's an important psychological component, which is the illusion of control. Passengers in an airplane have very little they have control of, they are told when they can go to the bathroom and when they have to stay in their seat, they are given their meals rather than choosing when to eat, etc. Passengers have the option to ...


28

I see several challenges with this design, both technological and not: Making that design safe enough will be difficult, the structure you add in the cabin would need to be strong enough to maintain rigidity in a crash. That much rigidity would add weight, and would add loads to the structure The pod walls will make it hard to get by people in the single ...


25

It applies to helicopters too. When on holiday in the West Indies, one of the locations offered helicopter rides. If anyone booked one, they contacted the local freight helicopter company who put the seats back into the helicopter, then they flew you round the bay, then took the seats out again to continue their bread-and-butter freight work. The pilot ...


25

Was my fellow passenger right? No. That photo is taken in a B777-300 (2 aisles, 4 seats in the centre and three at the sides, lavatories only behind the central rows, rows on the left side of the aircraft are one more than the central ones at that location): As you can see the wall is just were an emergency exit is, and if you will look on the other side ...


24

It's for safety. Smoking may be prohibited, but if a passenger smokes anyway, you don't want the remains of the cigarette to start a fire due to improper disposal, as probably happened with Varig Flight 820: A possible cause of the fire was that the lavatory waste bin contents caught fire after a still lit cigarette was thrown into it, the FAA issued AD ...


24

Not only is it expensive, as in less seats, the relatively high speed of current airliners mean that most flights aren't that long. It wasn't always that way. In the 1930's, the average speed of an airliner was 130-180mph. Due to the slow speed and lengthy flight times, sleeping berths were installed, especially in the case of the very long range ocean ...


23

It would appear that the aircraft you flew was D-AGWR, a A319 with MSN (Manufacturer Serial Number) 4285 delivered in April 2010 (hence fairly new). There is a switch at the bottom of the overhead panel, next to the seat belt sign, slightly right of the middle. Flip it and they will extinguish. The functionality is a bit more complicated than it would ...


23

The problems I can see with that design: Increased structural weight: all things remaining the same, you will have less payload availability for luggage/cargo. Cabin servicing you either add an elevated kitchen (more weight) or you have to go up those stairs with the carts every time you want to service the cabin. Possible claustrophobia those modules look ...


19

In addition to the pressure differential, some aircraft also have mechanical locks. Here's the logic diagram for a 737 NG. This will be similar to all of Boeing's exit doors that are hinged at the top. These conditions cause the emergency exit doors to lock: Three or more of the entry/service doors are closed, and Either left or right engine is running, ...


18

You won't be able to detect any flex in an airliner fuselage sighting down the interior without optical instrumentation of some kind, or a laser. Where partition dividers are used without any obvious purpose, like separating classes or providing something to anchor something to, it's to break up "tunnel effect" of rows of heads in a tube out in front of you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible