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25

Yes, the tower can tell an aircraft to abort take off and instruct it to return to the gate, although it probably never got that far in this case, I'm guessing that they got to the runway or were asked to line up when the request came in. This was probably at the direction of Ryanair, since the tower would otherwise not have any information on the wrong ...


22

I have never heard "tally ho" used in civilian aviation and it not a recognised phrase so should not be used. A civilian ATCO would not think positively about anyone using that phrase. It used to be used in military comms in combat. Its usage arose during WW1 when the Royal Flying Corps (and later the Royal Air Force) drew its crews mostly from the "...


20

No: that does not count as night flying. The CAA defines "Night" (Air Navigation Order, Article 129) as: ‘Night’ means the time from half an hour after sunset until half an hour before sunrise (both times inclusive), sunset and sunrise being determined at surface level; Similarly, the FAA's definition (FAR 1.1) is: The time between the end of evening ...


16

I presume you are from UK since it is the only country I know of that uses practice pans. Basically, ICAO (ICAO Annex 10, Volume V, § 4.1.3.1.1) states that the emergency frequency 121.5 MHz (sometimes called "guard") shall be used only for genuine emergencies. So typically any other use is considered misuse. However, countries can file deviations from ...


15

Pondlife pretty much hit the nail on the head. When a business goes bankrupt or bust, depending on jurisdiction, the assets of the company may not belong to the company anymore, they may belong to creditors. Monarch may not have even owned them in the first place, since some airlines use leases from other airlines or banks to get aircraft. Even if Monarch ...


12

A listening squawk is a transponder code you set to indicate to an ATC controller that you are listening out on a particular frequency. Unlike squawk codes assigned by the controller, the listening squawk is not unique to your aircraft but is a set (and published) code for the particular area. In the UK it is commonly used in the uncontrolled airspace ...


10

No, Tally-Ho is not accepted phraseology in UK civil aviation, and in 14 years of flying in the UK I've never heard anyone use it. At non-ATC airfields you occasionally hear some non-standard phrases, often with a bit of humor, but I've never heard that one. If a controller asks if you have visual contact with an aircraft you would just say "affirmative" ...


9

This is also know in Europe as an Enroute Instrument Rating or EIR, which allows flights under Instrument Flight Rules in the cruise phase, but not for departure or approach. It is based on EASA FCL 825 FCL.825 En-route Instrument Rating (EIR) (a) Privileges and conditions. (1) The privileges of the holder of an en-route instrument rating (EIR) ...


9

Not just helicopters. It happens all the time in my neck of the woods (Alaska) in small planes with big bouncy tires. We probably have more "field landings" (called bush landings, or "off airport operations") than landings at actual airports. OK, well maybe not quite that many - but enough that my local aviation college has an entire semester course ...


8

According to the UK CAA, a model aircraft is defined as: any ‘Small Unmanned Aircraft (SUA)’ (0-20 kg) used for sporting and recreational purposes and a ‘large model aircraft’ is defined as any ‘Unmanned Aircraft’ (over 20 kg) used for sporting and recreational purposes. The following rule applies to all "small unmanned aircraft", i.e. up to 20kg: ...


8

The list is exactly one item long: Any condition which would impair your ability to conduct the flight safely, and in accordance with FAA Regulations. Any more specific list will miss things and be riddled with loopholes - at some point we have to trust that pilots are sane and responsible individuals, just like we do when we let people get in a car. From ...


8

The rules are as follows: Privileges and limitations A holder of a PPL may, for compensation or hire, act as a crewmember of an aircraft in connection with any business or employment if— a. the flight is only incidental to that business or employment; and b. the aircraft does not carry passengers or property for compensation or ...


8

No, "tally-ho" is not acceptable. CAP 413, the UK Radiotelephony Manual, defines a correct response to traffic information like this: G-CD, traffic is a Cherokee upwind and a Tomahawk late downwind Roger, G-CD ... Traffic in sight, G-CD The phrase "tally-ho" is not mentioned anywhere in CAP 413.


8

There's no way to know for sure, since UK does not allow us to listen to ATC transmissions, BUT... I seriously doubt the tower told them to abort the takeoff. I just don't see the company calling the tower unless it's a safety related problem. The company almost certainly called the aircraft who then had to inform the tower they had to return to the gate ...


8

Having gone through this process, I thought I'd share my experiences and timescales: Useful Docs: https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/InformationNotice2017029.pdf http://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/SRG2140_Issue02_Enabled.pdf 1 Oct 2018 Get a checkout from an instructor and get them to sign the SRG2140 form and also certify copies of the docs required (...


7

All aircraft experience the same G force per degree of bank angle, so a 60 degree turn in a Cessna produces 2G just like a 60 degree turn in Concorde would produce 2G. The difference is that a Cessna doing 100 knots could circle in 0.2 miles by using a 60 degree bank angle. Concorde doing 1000 knots and 60 degrees would take up 19.5 miles to do the same ...


7

Less busy than Gibraltar, but in the UK proper, Sumburgh in Shetland is an example of "road crossing the runway" on a relatively active airport - it even comes complete with level crossing gates, which are a startling thing to see on the road ahead when you know there's no railway!


6

Obviously, putting publically-accessible areas within an airport's apron, taxiways, or runway environments is normally avoided as much as possible. However, sometimes space constraints don't give you another option. As Federico mentioned in a comment, Gibraltar International Airport is a famous example of this. A major city street runs right through the ...


6

There are four very general reasons - really, categories of reasons - that I can think of to ground a pilot (or for a pilot to ground himself): It would be illegal to fly for obvious procedural reasons, e.g. your license has expired, you've exceeded legal limits on flying hours It would be illegal to fly for obvious medical reasons, e.g. you're taking a ...


6

In the US, aircraft numbers are requested or reserved from an available list by the aircraft owner: N-Number Availability Query. Then the owner, the manufacturer in the case of new aircraft, submits an application for registration with the reserved or available number. This order of events (to reserve then request assignment) is important as registration ...


6

NOTE: My answer is US specific Not only is there no need to operate from an airport, it is recommended not to, if there are aircraft operating from the airport. Paramotors operate (in the US) under FAR Part 103. 103.13 Operation near aircraft; right-of-way rules. (a) Each person operating an ultralight vehicle shall maintain vigilance so as to see ...


6

In the UK a paramotor does not have to take off from an airfield. There is an explanation of the UK regulation of paramotors on the British Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association website. You do need the landowner's permission to take off, but you don't need any type of pilot's licence. You have to comply with the rules of the air (the ANO), as does any ...


6

Seems understandable to me. It may be more clear with commas... "(a) when landing, a flying machine or glider must leave clear, on its left, any aircraft which has landed, is already landing or is about to take off;" Basically leave enough room between you and any aircraft which may be on your left as you pass them. The grammar may be a little dated but ...


5

Take a look at page 2 of the "Dronecode". The illustration makes it quite obvious that the 50 metres refers to both vertical and horizontal distance:


5

Flyer magazine had an article on this recently. I've not been able to find the full article on their website, but I have found this which at least partially answers your question. https://www.flyer.co.uk/gopro-camera-mounts-to-be-approved-by-engineer/ From the article, which was published in Feb 2016: Mounting a camera is a modification, and requires ...


5

My local aerodrome has a café underneath the control tower. To get to it, you have to go air-side and cross the main taxiway. There is no control on this - absolutely anybody can park up and walk over. It's not strictly a public right of way, but I'm sure one exists somewhere. With that said, I think you may be reading a little to much into it - the ...


4

EASA: this is a European Union body, so yes, the UK is a member state. CAA: There are many Civil Aviation Authorities worldwide, basically each is a national entity within the corresponding state. So, specifically for the UK, yes, there exists a body known as CAA that is a state entity, formally independent but in practice dependent on the UK Government (...


4

Falstro's referring to the european en-route IFR rating, not the UK IMC rating. The UK IMC rating (I have one) is a national rating which allows departures, approaches and flight in instrument meteorological conditions, albeit with higher minimums. It can only be used within the UK, not including the channel islands, which means once you leave UK airspace ...


4

Article 94 of the Air Navigation Order (1) A person must not cause or permit any article or animal (whether or not attached to a parachute) to be dropped from a small unmanned aircraft so as to endanger persons or property. (2) The person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft may only fly the aircraft if reasonably satisfied that the flight ...


4

Stapleford and Damyns Hall are both in class G airspace, so there would be no need to file a flight plan or ask permission of anyone to make the flight. The only thing you might need to do is call Damyns Hall in case they are PPR (Prior Permission Required). VFR flights generally don't need any sort of flight plan unless you are going abroad or to the ...


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