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This is quite similar to the other question you asked. From my knowledge as a flight simulator enthusiast I can summarize the following: Boeing aircraft in the past used to be controlled pretty much direct pilot with cables running through the aircraft to control hydraulic actuator valves that power the flight control surfaces. The rudder is usually ...


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Another historical perspective: Junkers helped to found and participated in dozens of airlines in the early 1920s. This helped to boost demand for his products (mainly the F-13, but all started with two converted military two-seaters). That was everything but unusual: Many aircraft factories, among them Albatros and Sablatnig in Germany, tried to shift ...


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In the UK there would be no problem. Back in the day, Handley Page ran their own airline to help boost demand for air travel after WWI. But most manufacturers do not like being tied to one operator, and most operators do not like being tied to one airline, so it lasted only as long as the market needed it to.


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I did a little searching (I'm NOT a lawyer) and couldn't come up with anything that would explicitly prohibit a company from operating as both in the USA or the EU -- but I'm definitely not authoritative on that. The definitions are a little fuzzy: airline can mean a few different things in a strict legal sense: there's a big difference between someone ...


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The Airbus Beluga (Airbus A300-600ST) is a modified version of the standard Airbus A300-600 designed to transport oversized cargo. The plane was designed by AĆ©rospatiale and DASA, two of the major Airbus partners. The Beluga is operated by Airbus Transport International (ATI), a wholly owned subsidiary of Airbus Group that was established specifically to ...


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I think it depends on the country, but mostly, yes, an airplane manufacturer can operate as an airline at the same time. Take one example, Antonov. Antonov builds planes like the AN-225, and also flies the AN-225 in cargo operations. I don't know about US regulations about this, but Boeing does operate it's own aircraft in airshows. And as for all ...


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This is the In flight refueling probe, which can be used for refueling while the helicopter is airborne: (image source: pinterest.com) It is almost 9 meters long to make sure the rotors do not hit the refueling drogue. You can see it in action in the following picture: (image source: chinook-helicopter.com)


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The launch customers for the 747-8 were Cargolux and Nippon Cargo Airlines, both air freight operators who wanted the 747-8F. The first orders for the 747-8I didn't materialize until several months later. Source: Wikipedia


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