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43

It's a Fedex 777F N894FD in (probably) pre-delivery aerial photography/test flight accompanied by one of Boeing's chase aircraft. After some maneuvers (shown below), the plane headed to MEM, Fedex's "SuperHub". (Source) The flight on flightradar24: https://www.flightradar24.com/2019-07-24/03:16/12x/FDX9032/2168b4b1 and flightaware: https://flightaware.com/...


28

Boeing did have a small regional jet called the Boeing 727. This plane was designed to operate at smaller airports, with independence from ground facilities as a selling feature. The best example is that the 727 had built-in stairs in the rear underbelly of the aircraft. This could be opened in flight until some hijacker known as DB Cooper jumped out to make ...


25

It looks like an air-air photography trip by Boeing - the lead airplane is a LearJet, a type often used for this type of job with a turreted camera sticking out of the floor for views to the rear, ie for head-on shots of the target aircraft which in this case is a 777.


20

While airliners don't have "model years" like cars do, they are certainly changed over time. There are major "generations" of some aircraft types, like the 737. The "original" (-100,-200) was replaced by the "Classic" (-300,-400,-500) which was replaced by the "Next Generation" (-600,-700,-800,-900) and most recently replaced by the "MAX" (-7,-8,-9,-10). ...


13

They are different, yes. The 73H is not the Max 8. The 73H is an -800 with winglets. The -800 has been in service since 1998, with 4,991 deliveries as of February 28, 2019. See here: What is the difference between Boeing 73G, 73H and 737? 73H - Boeing 737-800 with winglets (8th letter of the alphabet) The Max 8's IATA code you'd find on a ticket is 7M8. ...


9

As far as length is concerned, there are two versions of the 777 classic series, the -200 and -300. The -300 is the longer one, at 242 ft 4 in (73.86 m). Other than choosing one of these two models, there is no customer option to change the length of the plane. I'm not sure where the Saudia data comes from. But the 777-300 is not the longest plane in the ...


8

Well it did have one in the form of the ‘slugs’ - the earlier 737 classic aircraft. They sold outrageously well along with the 727s to fill regional or national routes. And let’s not forget the airline business was considerably different than it is today in the form of structure and operations so what we consider a ‘regional’ aircraft is very different to ...


8

That is one of two heated drain masts for the lavatory sinks. How does the drainage of the gray water work?


8

I think you fell for a common misunderstanding: Fly by wire ≠ flight control augmentation It is - in the first place - another method to get the pilots input out to the control surface just like cables or pushrods. Just not mechanical but electric/digital. If you want to alter the pilot input for whatever reason it is way easier with digital signals ...


7

Via a third party Boeing is heavily involved in design and marketing this beauty, the Sukhoi Superjet 100. 78 or 98 seats, with talk of a stretch or two to 120 and 140. Russian built, with largely Western engines, subsystems and avionics. It was poised to do quite well in the RJ market until Euromaidan/Crimea/Donbass threw a big monkey wrench in the ...


6

The 737 was basically created to be Boeing's regional jet, but ended up growing into something larger to meet customer demand. The DC-9 was introduced in 1965 and had variants seating from 90 to 135 in a single class. The 727-100 was introduced around the same time and already covered the upper end of this range. The 727-200 was even larger, almost ...


5

There is no way to totally inhibit GPWS on the B737 except by pulling the circuit breaker. What you can do is inhibit specific modes of the GPWS. This is done via the following switches: Source: Boeing Co. The Below G/S switch (1) inhibits the below glide slope alerting. Flap and Gear inhibit switches (4 and 5) allow inhibiting the "Too Low Flaps" ...


5

The aircraft accident was caused by ice accumulating in the Fuel Oil Heat Exchanger (FOHE) of the Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engines which subsequently blocked fuel flow to the engines. The official accident investigation concluded: The investigation identified the following probable causal factors that led to the fuel flow restrictions: Accreted ice ...


4

For the 737: RTO is used for takeoff, and puts full hydraulic system pressure to the brakes. The other autobrake settings, 1, 2, 3, and Max, are used for landing, and brake to achieve a specified deceleration rates. In autobrakes Max, you get very firm brake application, but it's still something less than unmetered system pressure to the brakes. In all ...


4

There are very good reasons to implement coupled column/yokes for aeroplane control: they are right in front of you, you can apply force with both hands, and you can feel immediately what input the other crew member is giving. The force sensors in our hands are very precise feedback instruments that should and can be fully utilised. The upside of the side ...


4

These are mostly IATA type designators, except for OAAG, 76A, 76B and 77E. 77F is the official IATA designation of the freighter version of the 777. The rest: 77E seems to be an internal designation used by British Airways for a specific sub-fleet with an increased gross weight. 76B seems same as above just for 767-300ER. I wasn't able to find anything ...


4

Please refer to the following website for more details https://slate.com/technology/2019/03/ethiopian-airlines-737-max-black-box-sent-to-paris-why.html The International Civil Aviation Organization, which sets the standards for aircraft accident investigations, says that the country where an incident occurs is in charge of the investigation If the ...


4

Nothing besides cancelling or rebooking (while hoping the new flight will have a different type assigned to it). Unless your transport contract with the airline goes into inordinate detail about the service to be rendered you won't be able to dictate what type of aircraft should the used for the trip.


4

According to the below references, these commercial aircraft are capable of doing the Micro-SLOP procedures with 0.1 NM increments: INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS' ASSOCIATIONS 58TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE – Conchal, Costa Rica, 20-24 May 2019 2.6.2 Most flight management systems in service today can execute an automatic offset track in ...


4

And some older Mooneys have infinite flap settings depending on how much you pump them up... The reality is that there are no regulations on how many flap settings an airplane must have and on an airliner that may also have things like speed breaks or slats as well, flap settings may vary by design or simply by engineering choice. Flaps are used for ...


3

Other answers have noted the history of both the 727 and 737, which started as small regional jets, but grew due to demands from established customers. Regional jets, by contrast, tend to be flown by smaller, regional airlines that transitioned from turboprops (such as the the Bombardier Dash 8) and consequently went to the same manufacturer when they wanted ...


3

Boeing had evaluated a sidestick controller as early as the 737's development, and concluded it was too much of a change, all at once, from older airliners. The 737 with its high-bypass engines and design that almost stood up to this day was a revolution as it was. The year was 1967. Airbus was entering its A320 into the market in 1987, a full 20 years ...


3

The Boeing 757 has three fully independent hydraulic systems. The three systems are "Left," "Center," and "Right." The left system is powered by an engine driven pump (EDP) on the left hand engine, an alternating circuit motor pump (ACMP) located in the wheel well, and a power transfer unit (PTU) powered by the right hydraulic system. The center system is ...


3

I am not aware of any manufacturer making a serious proposal to develop a jumbo jet with low bypass-ratio engines. Most airline manufacturers tend to develop a plane from customers requirements, whether that customer is military or civilian. Civilian airlines in the late 1950s were already nervous about the much higher costs for jet-powered aircraft and ...


2

Prior to the NG, the total number of slats is 6, that is 3 slats per wing Thus there are 6 slats numbered from 1 to 6, that is slats 1 and 6 are the outer slat The NG's have an extra outboard slat on each wing giving 8 in total. They have the same sequencing as the classic Thus a 3 slats per wing refers to 737 prior to the NG more precisely Leading edge ...


2

Pilots will have a "Type Certification" that ensures they have been trained and can operate a specific model, or group of models that have identical cockpits. The classic example is the 757/767, the 757 being a narrow-body and smaller plane, but both have the same cockpit layout, so a pilot can go from one to another without issue. This FAA Document (PDF) ...


2

According to this document/study guide Flap Load Relief – on the 757 and a few 767s, if the flaps are at 30 and Flaps 30 speed is exceeded, the flaps automatically retract to 25. On most 767s, if the flaps are at 25 or 30 and the placard airspeed is exceeded, the flaps automatically retract to 20. The flaps will automatically re-extend when ...


2

The autopilot will always disengage when you try to override the controls. Manual control has priority over autopilot. For the Boeing 737, the control mode changes to CWS (Control wheel Steering), which is an autopilot mode but follows control column inputs. So if you manually set it on 12 degrees pitch down (please do not do this in real life) then the ...


2

Airlines in most countries (outside of US and Canada) usually offer ab initio pilot programs, meaning they will train a pilot with no experience. Training will be paid for in the form of a loan which will be deducted from your future salary. However there are some caveats. First, if you fail, you will be responsible for paying off the loan. There is no ...


2

For most accurate information, you can check the following link from: IATA PART 2 — AIRCRAFT TYPE DESIGNATORS (DECODE) As noted in previous answers, 76A, 76B, 77E and OAAG, those are not IATA aircraft codes, hence must be some internal codification for some airlines. Also wikipedia offers a best view of the whole list here but for latest information, the ...


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