94

This is a feature offered on some United Airlines aircraft and flights. It's an interesting way to hear what's going on in the cockpit. You can find lots of information by searching for United channel 9.


65

If you had an engine fire, even though it may be "out", you want your airplane on the ground as soon as you possibly can. You don't know what structural damage is lurking as a result of the fire. Dumping fuel would take a fair amount time to get rid of any significant amount. So it's "Screw the landing gear. We're landing overweight".


63

There are precedents: the flight recorders of AF447 spent two years at the bottom of the ocean, and revealed all that had happened after being retrieved. So they had survived being immersed in salty water at high pressure, making it very likely that MH370s boxes have survived as well. Time of immersion is less relevant: oxidation (rust forming) is much ...


57

Roll control is provided by 2 flaperons, 2 ailerons, and 14 spoilers. Spoiler panels 4 and 11 are controlled mechanically rather than electrically. They are driven directly from control wheel deflections via a control cable. In case of compete electrical loss, limited roll control is available until the electrical system is restored. This probably ...


55

On twin-engined aircraft the standard procedure for engine failure is to land as soon as possible. Since it is possible to land overweight—and aircraft are designed so that it is—delay to dump fuel is not considered acceptable, and no reasonable pilot would delay the landing when they can land already. Landing overweight is not really a big issue. The ...


45

The Boeing 777 has an excellent reputation when it comes to safety. Just under 1500 have been built which have accumulated more than five million flights and 20 million flight hours. Only 6 aircraft have been lost in a accident, which is a really low number considering the number of aircraft and flights. Moreover, of those hull losses, at least one (MH17) ...


39

The FAA has decided/proposed (Nov 2017) that the folding mechanism must comply with certain standards, of which: The wingtips must have means to safeguard against unlocking from the extended, flight-deployed position in flight, as a result of failures, including the failure of any single structural element. All sources of airplane power that could ...


38

ATC and aircraft communications (at least in the US) are not restricted for receiving. Anyone can purchase (or make) an "Air band" receiver (or scanner radio) tunable through (roughly) 118-140 MHz and listen to ATC and aircraft communications.


29

Turning Radius, as found in a planning document: 28.7m for a Boeing 777-200 34.7m for a Boeing 777-300 Rotating around one a point a bit off the wing to allow both wheels to roll throughout. Minimum Pavement Width 47.5m for a Boeing 777-200 56.0m for a Boeing 777-300 Source Be aware that this is not exactly ideal- visibility from the flightdeck is not ...


29

They are called vortex generators, and their function is to create a small vortex which re-energizes the boundary layer. Here is a better picture which also shows that their leading edge is swept like that of a delta wing: Vortex generators on a T-45 (picture source) In essence, they are small wings which each create their own delta wing vortex. This ...


28

As of currently, the answer to this question is in principle no for commercial aircraft, at least not remotely. There are two parts to this: From a system perspective: Aircraft systems could probably be 'hacked'- assuming you could for instance screw up the flight computer by changing the chips in the belly- but there is no way you could really pull this ...


28

It is because of the carbon fibre. This is the same reason that the 787 has bigger passenger windows. Here you can find a link explaining the polarized windows on the 787. Because of its higher tensile strength, you can have bigger windows. Windows are considered weak points in the fuselage where there is no structural reinforcement. This means that the ...


26

It is a system that Airbus already uses in the A380 and some A350's. They call it BTV (Brake to Vacate). It allows the pilot to select a certain runway exit in advance (e.g. while approaching). After touchdown, the plane automatically brakes so it can vacate the runway at that given exit. Airbus says: When the pilot chooses a runway exit point, the ...


25

Flying with only one of two engines will not increase range, but reduce it. A gas turbine consumes fuel in proportion to the mass of air moving through it, so with increasing altitude consumption decreases proportional with air density. Thrust goes down with density as well, so thrust-specific fuel consumption is roughly constant (actually, the engine ...


25

The Boeing 777X website states that this is to enable a more efficient wing (read: wider span) while maintaining the airport gate and taxi footprint of the classic 777 (which ensures airlines can use the 777X on roughly the same airports and intermix operations with the classic fleet).


24

Many modern aircraft have been designed with winglets, and older ones have been retrofitted with them. They allow a wing to produce more lift with less drag. However, the benefit is even greater if the wingspan is simply extended. The downside of increasing wingspan is that wingspan affects many aspects of airport infrastructure, especially taxiways and ...


23

They are vortex generators, used to delay flow separation. These vortex generators are usually attached near the leading edge of the wing and create small vortices, that prevent flow separation at high angles of attack. Image from microaero.com During normal flight, the airflow is accelerated over the wing, producing lift. At this point, the airflow is ...


22

Could winds of up to 150 km/h impact the structural loads on the B777-200LR? Not at all. The dynamic pressures on the plane depend on the plane's velocity with respect to the air, not the ground speed. Flying in 150 km/h tailwind is the same as flying with no wind, the plane's indicated and true airspeeds won't be affected. True airspeed is the plane's ...


22

The 777X is still in development and it will be powered by the General Electric GE9X (also still in development). The current talk is that GE is working on a proprietary method (has been for 20 years) that will make the chevrons obsolete. Namely the use of an oxide-oxide ceramic matrix composite, which they have unveiled already (October 2013) for the ...


21

Some comments state this was a wind-shear, is that correct? Looking at the windsock which appears in the right bottom corner at 0:12 and remains visible for about 4 seconds, you can tell there is little wind, not what you would associate with wind shear. I want to ask here, what caused this very bumpy landing? It is always hard to judge the actions of ...


21

The answer depends on what kind of aircraft you're talking about, and how much control the crew has over the pressurization systems. For example, in theory you could very well reduce or completely shut off the air to the cabin on a 777. This could also be done by a single crew member alone. The pilots have full control of this system should say the one of ...


19

As in anything in aviation design, the use of wingtips has both advantages and disadvantages. In the end, the decision to use (or not) a winglet is based on the cost-benefit analysis of the winglet to be used in that particular aircraft. All winglets incur a drag and weight penalty- the question is whether they conserve fuel more than they increase it in ...


18

The first point I would stress on is that you don't program the autopilot. You program the FMS (Flight Management System), which looks like a very large calculator. In this picture it is the device under then first officer's hand. On top of the PFD (Primary Flight Display) you see the MCP (Mode Control Panel). This is what controls the modes that the ...


17

What's the "safest aircraft" depends in large part on who operates it, how they operate it, and where. For many operators the 777 will be their prestige airliner, being assigned the most senior, most experienced, crews, the best maintenance, etc. etc.. That alone will mean less incidents and accidents than other types. They also have the range and ceiling to ...


17

The rules on visibility from the cockpit have been updated. There are rules and regulations imposed on the view from the cockpit, for very good reasons - collision avoidance for instance. During approach, the pilots must be able to see the runway while on the glide slope, at any COG location. From Torenbeek: The angle of view forward and downward must be ...


17

If not, why would you still be looking for the missing aircraft and especially the blackbox, if there was nothing to find out about the reason that caused the 777 to disappear? In fact we are concerned with 2 black boxes, the flight parameters box, and the voice recorder, these are complementary. The voice recorder is extremely important too, for instance ...


16

There are two main differences. A rocket engine does not need an external source of oxygen for combustion and has only one opening - the exhaust. It gets oxygen from its own fuel supply, typically using liquid oxygen or from another oxidiser. A jet engine, such as those used on 777s, needs to draw in external air to get oxygen for its combustion and has ...


16

Some heavies (747, 777, A380) fly short- to medium-haul in Asia and the Middle East. You could say they're stealing jobs from 737's and A320's. Anyway, what I could find was for the US only. Checking the Revenue Passenger Miles Total by Aircraft Type for 2016 on transtats.bts.gov we find— All 737 variants: 153.2 billion All 777 variants: 38.3 billion ...


16

The Boeing 777 is a very automated aircraft. The takeoff altitude, landing altitude, and cabin pressurization altitude are all automatically set when you enter the departure airport and destination airport in the Flight Management Computer. The EICAS message ALT LDG appears when the FMC is not controlling the landing altitude. This can be caused by one of ...


15

The 777-31H is a standard Boeing 777-300 manufactured for Emirates (customer code 1H). The 777-31H(ER) is a Boeing 777-300ER (Extended Range) again for Emirates. Compared to the standard 777-300, the 777-300ER has: A longer range due to the extra fuel it can carry (145538 kg compared to 135880 kg for the -300 baseline) A higher Operating Empty Weight (...


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