92

From the description below the image you linked: The Honeywell, Boeing 757 test bed appeared on static display for a few days before departing half way through the event. A testbed aircraft is an aircraft used for flight research or testing new equipment such as engines. You can see other photos without engine or with a jet engine instead of a propeller ...


45

The airplane doesn't "need" that engine. It is a test platform for testing the engine during flight. Obviously, you don't want to rely on the engine you're testing, in case something goes wrong! So the plane flies with 2 large turbofan engines, while the engineers are testing the smaller engine mounted up front. If you look closely, you can even see the ...


27

This is really two questions Why does a fuselage bend? Why does the 757 fuselage bend more than others I'll give the simple answers here. You can go into a LOT of detail, but the detailed answers are mainly just bringing more information on design/engineering differences into the simple answers (eg composites bend/break in a different way to aluminium) ...


24

What Mike said is correct, but I thought I'd add a little more. The hose is technically called the "PCA Hose" which stands for Pre-Conditioned Air Hose. The hose supplies pre-conditioned air to the aircraft from a ground based unit, that is typically electrically powered and is usually mounted on to each jetbridge. The air can be cold or hot, depending on ...


19

Testing a new engine design can only go so far on the ground. At some point, it has to be tested in conditions representative of actual use - in other words, in flight. You don't want to be dependent on an untested engine to get you airborne and back on the ground safely. The solution to this problem is to mount the test article on an aircraft that is ...


19

Boeing had already a fuselage for the 757 that fit the bill. It came originally from the 707 via the 727. To accommodate more baggage, the rear fuselage was deeper, as on the 737. During development Boeing engineers were afraid that directional stability might be insufficient with a deeper forward fuselage, so the lower half of the fuselage was kept from the ...


16

First, there is no fuselage bending to be seen in the linked movie. What might look like flexing is actually the seats and the interior panels moving due to inertial forces. In turbulent weather the aircraft will be shaken by gusts, and this causes the movement between seats and panels. Second, in the picture the flaps are in take-off, shifting the center ...


16

The 757 was designed after the oil shock of 1973 and represented the best which was possible in fuel efficiency. Therefore, its range is much greater, and with ETOPS certification it can be used on longer overwater trips. Besides, it shares the cockpit layout of it's twin aisle sibling 767, so flight crews could be certified on both with a single training. ...


12

Although the 737 has grown over the years, the 737 and 757 remain in different size classes. Both models can be ETOPS certified, although the 757 is more often used in long flights. At the time the 757 was introduced (in the 80's), the 737 classic series was current. For the 737-400: Passengers: 146 Length: 119 feet Wingspan: 95 feet Wing area: 1135 sq ...


10

A good source of public information is the aircraft characteristics document that the manufacturers typically publish for each model, including the A380. A scale planform drawing can be found on page 310 of the PDF, subject 8-0-0. Based on this drawing, the rough size of the ailerons can be estimated. The aileron is divided into three sections which move ...


7

The amount of time a plane in a dive spends close enough to the ground to ingest foreign objects and thereby damage its engines is of order ~fractions of a second. For a plane that is about to strike a building on the ground, the idea of FOD damage to its engines is not even relevant.


7

Rotation angle at takeoff is often the limiting factor in gear height. The 757-300 is 178ft long, 30ft longer than the Airbus 321 which also has tall landing gear. The first 737s were less than 100ft long, which allowed the short gear and later caused problems with the max9/10 stretches which went to 143ft. source


7

The yellow tube you see in the photo is "in-ground air conditioning". It is more common to see it connected to the bridge.


6

(NASA) On average, the elliptical fuselage of the 767 is 1.34 m (~4'4") wider. The fuselage dimensions are: Height Width Area (m^2) Boeing 767 5.41 5.03 21.4 Boeing 757 4.01 3.76 11.8 The slightly wider fuselage results in double the cross-sectional area. That's enough to double the drag. The slightly narrower ...


5

How could flight 77 into the pentagon overcome the compression lift of the ground effect at 460 KIAS that close to the ground? Pitch. If an airplane's nose is low enough, it will descend and eventually collide with the ground. In the extreme example, with the nose pointed directly down, lift is no longer holding the airplane up at all; the only force ...


5

It's an American Airlines ACARS unit.


4

When you have controls designed to be operated manually, in an airplane that heavy and that fast, you have to include things to provide aerodynamic force compensation like servo tabs and offset hinge lines (look at the IL-82's rudder hinges; like a B-29's...the most obvious tell-tail of manual controls on a large aircraft) to make the control forces ...


4

The original 757 cockpit was considered “glass.” It consisted of six screens: Pilot’s PFD and ND, Co-pilots PFD and ND, and an upper and lower EICAS screen. Behind the scenes, there is a triple autopilot system (left, center and right), two flight management computers, three flight control computers, three display control units (think SGU or symbol ...


3

I doubt that you can get an airline specific checklist for an airplane, but for Boeing 757-200, a generic one is available. Please note that they might be for simulators (as Ben mentioned) but are close enough. PDF Trello X-Plane (screenshot below)


3

The 757 Wing and Center Body Section was manufactured at the Renton plant at KBFI.


3

The Boeing 757 has three fully independent hydraulic systems. The three systems are "Left," "Center," and "Right." The left system is powered by an engine driven pump (EDP) on the left hand engine, an alternating circuit motor pump (ACMP) located in the wheel well, and a power transfer unit (PTU) powered by the right hydraulic system. The center system is ...


3

(Own work; adapted scaled drawings via boeing.com) It's no coincidence the fuselage widths match, the 757 borrowed the 727's fuselage, which width-wise is the same as the 707 and 737. @Brilsmurfffje and @CarloFelicione already raised good practical points, namely the indirect airline costs and why airlines would favor the 737 over a 757 re-engine, and the ...


2

Not for cheap it won’t. The 757 went out of production in 2004. Boeing has since dismantled the tooling for that airplane and it would cost a lot of money to get that set up again. Then all the subcontractors have to be brought up to speed as well. Even if you could build 57s again - and there is a market for them - it would be getting increasingly ...


1

This is the case frequently, as the aircraft doesn’t have the same pitch angle on ground while accelerating, or at rotation, or at climb or at cruise. So the intake slant is calculated to the best appropriate as an average. As a summary this is not specific to this engine on this aircraft


1

According to this, the 757 has 3 hydraulic systems and 2 PTUs


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