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6

So how does the A320 design address this? Longer landing gear with attachment points further outward on the wing [...]? Yes, the A320 has a longer and therefore wider landing gear. You can find general aircraft dimensions in the Airplane Characteristics for Airport Planning documents. Airbus A320-200: 7.59m wide landing gear Boeing 737-800: 5.72m wide ...


1

Yes, a VNAV PTH certainly needs descent winds so as to calculate and construct the most efficient flyable PATH. The PATH as we know. is built backwards from the landing RWY threshold to Top Of Descent (TOD). Before I continue, I must say that sometimes managing VNAV PTH can become an unnecessarily complex task, if that's where you're coming from. We always ...


0

Yes, both can be used together, allowing actual thrust for takeoff to be much lower than simply 25%. Mostly, Operators prefer the lowest possible thrust so as to have longer engine life, more time on the wing in regular service than off the wing in maintenance. A simple visualization of the derate is to pretend there's a smaller, less powerful engine on the ...


0

Yes, that is allowed. You can combine selection of a fixed derate and an assumed temperature for the takeoff thrust on the FMC N1 Limit page, but only up to a reduction of 25%. Takeoff Derate Fixed derates can be selected on the N1 LIMIT page. [...] Derated takeoff rating can be further reduced by assumed temperature. [...] Assumed Temperature Thrust ...


2

Possibly, but not necessarily. The climb thrust can be selected on the FMC N1 Limit page. The choice is between CLB, CLB-1 and CLB-2. The climb thrust is then reduced according to the selection: 7 - Climb (CLB) Push – selects full rated climb thrust limit. [...] 8 - Reduced Climb (CLB–1 and CLB–2) Push – selects the associated reduced thrust climb mode. CLB–...


8

If everything is working as designed then the Master Caution is always accompanied by one of the 12 annunciator lights (or more than 1, depending on the situation). If things aren't working as designed, then what you'll see depends on the nature of the malfunction. If it's as simple as a burned-out bulb in the annunciator panel, then you could get the Master ...


1

Boeing had only just introduced the 737 NG and sat back to relax when Airbus announced the A320neo. It trumped the NG and looked like eating seriously into Boeing's planned market. Boeing felt they had no choice but to fight back. They had a project for a replacement going, but bringing it forward faced an impossible problem; it could not be done in time to ...


4

As the other answers mention, Boeing management was complacent and were caught with their pants down by the Airbus 320 Neo. Upon its birth, Airbus industries took on a whole new, and radical, if I may say so, approach to airplane design. From the very beginning they produced a family of aircraft, where Boeing with its payload of history made more "...


5

I would suggest the same reasons Boeing decided to pursue an update to the 737 over developing a new plane is the same reason Airbus only updated the A320 (a 33 year old plane) instead of building an entirely new platform, time and development costs. Airbus sunk around \$25 billion into the A380 and lost money on the project, since it was cancelled before it ...


3

The Boeing 737 line of aircraft have been one of the most popular for a long, long time. This means that there are a LOT of airlines owning 737s and a LOT of pilots type rated on the 737s, and a HUGE network of supportive industries in the supply chain. If they came up with a design that is "too" different from the preceding models, then, according ...


13

Other sources confirm the statement from your documentary that James "Jim" McNerney made the decision to build the 737 MAX rather than a new model: When Airbus was about to land American Airlines with a huge order for the A320 family, both the ceo and neo, Boeing’s hand was forced. Within 48 hours, Jim McNerney, Albaugh’s boss, made the decision ...


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