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5

As Ron points out in the comments the question is not so much where as it is when. Aircrafts see the density altitude of the air around it not the true altitude they are at. On a very hot day at a very high altitude airport the density altitude may very well be higher than the true altitude by a significant amount which affects takeoff performance. The FAA ...


1

The Boeing 737 NG series first flew in 1997, but the fuel inerting system was only certified in 2006 according to b737.org.uk (emphasis mine): Centre Fuel Tank Inerting To date, two 737's, 737-400 HS-TDC of Thai Airways on 3 Mar 2001 and 737-300 EI-BZG operated by Philippine Airlines on 5 Nov 1990 have been destroyed on the ground due to explosions ...


3

According to ICAO, a preliminary report must be released after a year. There is no hard timeline for the full report: What are a State’s reporting obligations during and after an aircraft accident investigation? Under Annex 13 to the Chicago Convention, States in charge of an investigation must submit a Preliminary Report to ICAO within thirty days ...


28

To reduce damage in case of a bird strike. The restriction is not only for the 737-100 and -200 models, the 737 NG QRH says: WINDOW HEAT OFF In flight: WINDOWS HEAT switch (affected window) ..... OFF Limit airspeed to 250 knots maximum below 10,000 feet. Pull both WINDSHIELD AIR controls. This vents conditioned air to the inside of ...


0

The stab trim unit is an offset to the actual horizontal tailplane angle. It is added by Boeing to make the trim value positive. 1STU = 1 degree


3

About 45 Rotations In this YouTube video you can see Mentour pilot demonstrating manual trimming of a Boeing 737 NG. They start at about 11:30 with: we have 4 units nose down now and at 12:30 they say: now we are at about 3 degrees I counted 18 full rotations of the trim wheel in this time. This would result in $$ \frac{18}{4^\circ - 3^\circ} \...


1

On the Boeing 737 the trim wheels are directly connected to the stabilizer jackscrew with cables. The force required to move the trim wheels depends on the load on the stabilizer. The more you are out of trim, the more force is required to move the stabilizer. From the 737 NG FCOM (9.20.8 Flight Controls - System Description - Stabilizer Trim, emphasis mine)...


3

Looking at the Performance Limitations of the Boeing 737 (page 3), we see that the Flap Limit Speeds are +================+==============+ | Flap Position | Limit Speed | | | (KIAS) | +================+==============+ | 1 | 250 | +----------------+--------------+ | 2 | 250 | +--------------...


22

No, flaps are never used during a nose dive. We need to distinguish between two scenarios: Intentional nose dive: this is actually called a rapid descent maneuver. The FCTM (Flight Crew Training Manual) has a whole section dedicated to it. The general procedure looks like this: From the Boeing 737 NG FCTM (7.5 Maneuvers - Rapid Descent - Level Change (LVL ...


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