New answers tagged

0

Yellowknife, as an example I'm personally familiar with, has 2 runways: 16/34 is 7503 feet, 10/28 is 5001 feet. I've been a passenger in assorted models of 737 landing in all sorts of conditions on both of them and have had hard landings and soft ones, and the runway length didn't have much to do with it. I was once in the same aircraft with the same flight ...


13

Your pilot flying simply made a really firm landing. I'm typed on the 737 and have flown the -800 in and out of short runways (Chicago Midway and New York La Guardua). A skilled pilot can grease it on in gusty winds and can slam it on in calm conditions. (Don't flame me bruhs, this next bit is about copilots, but anyone - in either seat - can make a firm ...


18

Could be that crazy winds or wake turbulence (from another aircraft) pushed the aircraft out of the funnel and forced some maneuvering to get it back on centerline and guide slope. I later heard that pilots do sometimes make soft landings there — but shouldn’t good landings be routine? You are relying on "passenger comfort" as an indicator of a ...


0

You just never use that APU EGT gauge flying the NG. It’s almost pointless information as the APU ECU does it all. No non-normal checklists use it either.


33

You're probably being hard on them... it was not windy or gusty as we debarked (disembarked) The conditions you feel on the ground can be very different 50 feet in the air. Even from one end of the airport to the other can be different. As you were disembarking, I'm guessing you were near the terminal, which means you may have had some wind shielding as ...


11

Given that knowledge of EGT is important for flightcrew awareness of an APU overheat or other malfunction. All those are handled automatically by the APU's ECU (with built-in safeties). Same for the 737 NG series. So it was a gauge that can be done away with. According to an FAA document from Nov 2020 on the 737-800 and 737-8 (aka Max) differences, which ...


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