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6

It would make sense if you've ever been involved in a development program. It's important to understand the trade-offs Boeing was faced with. It was either the band-aid, MCAS, or kibosh the program. The "proper" solution to the problem was doing something physical to aircraft; limiting aft C of G, enlarging the tail, stretching the fuselage, or ...


4

The 737 does NOT use a G1000... Many of these devices are made by companies like honeywell or the makers of the airframe themselves although they may very well source the physical screen from another manufacturer.


0

No. The reason the 737 MAX had issues was because of the POSITION of the engines. There's nothing inherently wrong with larger engines on the same airframe. The reason the 737 MAX had issues was because the engines needed to be moved forward and up. The reason for that is that the 737 has short landing gear. Even with CFM-56 engines (737 Classic/NG), there's ...


-4

One last attempt to point out the elephant in the room and please don't delete this just because it is my answer. By all means, feel free to criticize it. What everybody seems to not want to see, is that trim issues are supposed to be non critical by definition. Regardless of what controls the trim surfaces. That goes for all aircraft,... except the 737. ...


2

All the answers here are good, and they address what you were probably intending to ask. But I want to address the question that you literally asked Why not more Max 8 accidents? i.e. why were there exactly two Max 8 accidents, and not, say, three or or five or ten? Lets review the timeline October 29, 2018: Crash 1: Lion Air Flight 610 March 10, 2019: ...


5

The problem with the MAX has nothing to do with the elevators being ineffective, the characteristics which lead to the pitching up will be present wherever you put the tail. It's the placement of the engines that are the problem. Moving the tail would require big changes, you have to strengthen the tail and structure around it, which would be extremely ...


9

No. A t-tail would worsen the characteristics of the airplane. While not necessarily a horrible idea in its own right, the already-nasty slow-flight/high alpha/stall characteristics of the aircraft that necessitated MCAS in the first place would make this idea dangerous. The pitch-up tendency could lead to a stall, which in a T-tail can lead to a deep stall. ...


1

Part of this has to do with how the 737-MAX was designed. I explained this in more detail in this answer, but the TL;DR here is The Max 8 was designed to be as close to identical to existing 737s as possible so that pilot retraining and full FAA certification would not be necessary MCAS could be shut off using the same methods as a runaway stabilizer (an ...


4

The fairing assemblies are made by Boeing itself. From ATS:


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