22

The answer to both of your questions is "yes". The FAA ordered, in effect, the installation of "Cooper Vanes" and did do so in 1972. The reason you could not find the answer may have been that the modifications were not called "Cooper Vanes" by the FAA and nor was the FAA targeting the 727 specifically. Instead they addressed ventral and tailcone exits on ...


13

I've got an aged book on pre-design of aircraft, which states that the B727 wing thickness was 13% at root and 9% at tip, average thickness 11% chord. $M_{M0}$ = 0.9, first flight of prototype is noted as 1963. The 727 was a derivative of the 707: first flight 1957, average thickness 10% chord, $M_{M0}$ = 0.9. So the 707 wing was even thinner than B727, ...


6

According this rather detailed page on the 727's engines: To restart in flight, an "air start" may be attempted. The start switch should be placed in the FLIGHT START position which will arm high energy ignition. The starter valve will not open. Ram air entering the engine is sufficient for start if the aircraft's speed is above 150 knots. When ...


6

An airliner wing is built to be as light as possible. Its strength is calculated to withstand the stresses of flying, i.e. lift equally distributed over the wing, bird strikes on the leading edge. The wing consists of one or more spars from the fuselage to the wingtip, ribs perpendicular to the spars and skin panels. All of these are made from thin ...


4

Large objects are fragile. Pretty much any two airplane-sized objects, when colliding at airplane-like speeds, will both be damaged by the collision. The reason for this is the square–cube law. As you increase the size of an object, its strength increases more slowly than its mass increases. So as a result, small objects tend to be very strong, and large ...


2

My favourite book for questions like this is Obert’s Aerodynamic Design of Transport Aircraft. It shows pressure distribution on the 727 wing and gives some AIAA papers as sources. If you track these down, that might reveal more. Unfortunately no airfoil reference is given; however it is very likely that the 727 uses a proprietary Boeing airfoil. Posting as ...


2

The 727 wing is a derivative of the earlier Boeing 720 wing which incorporated the leading edge glove, an added feature ahead of and atop the old airfoil from the fuselage to the inboard engine pylon. Actually that leading edge glove is a copy of the old original wing airfoil instead of designing a new one that would have been more costly. The 727 wing used ...


1

So far as the FAA is concerned there is no 727-200C at least not that ever carried a type certificate. The 727 series has a common type cert which you can find here and it has no listing of a 727-200C type. There are however 727-100C and a 727C types listed and some other numberings that use the C nomenclature but none that use -200C. The image that @...


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