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54

GE Aviation Clue 1. Parts designed at the Lynn MA plant have part numbers of the form xxxxTxxPxx, where x is a digit. 4922T12P01 fits that pattern. The gr.in is another clue. That refers to a weight that would be used in balancing the fan. GE uses units of gr.in. I'm fairly sure that Pratt uses oz.in, snecma uses gr.cm. I'm not sure what RR uses. But ...


29

What is this turbine part? This assembly is part of the turbine used to rotate the compressor section of a Pratt & Whitney PT6, a free turbine turboprop. It's known as compressor turbine or just CT. Where is it located? The compressor turbine is located at the exit nozzle of the annular combustion chamber, and is the first component which enters in ...


28

That looks very much like a TF-34 fan blade. The TF-34 is used on the A-10 Thunderbolt and S-3B Viking. The root style is known as "pinned" or "clevis". You can see a blade being pinned into the rotor hub in this photo: And there is a clear view of the blade root in this photo: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Steven Valencia, 18th Component Maintenance ...


27

The blades are loose in their "Fir Tree" blade mounts so that they can self balance. They are called "fir tree" because they are v shaped. As the rotation speed and centrifugal force increases, they move in the mounts and establish individual lead/lag positions to achieve a balanced disc. It will be understood that turbine wheels rotate at very high ...


25

Not all turbine blades are made of nickel alloy, some blades are made of such family of alloys but clearly not all. Some blades are actually made of ceramic materials. The turbine is always located after combustion chamber and the temperature which the first stage of turbine blades is able to resist is a proof of high technology engine. Those blades are ...


20

How would you communicate with (and power) these motors? The main rotor is spinning constantly - Wires won't work, they would wrap around the shaft and be shredded. A slip ring and brushes (as used in some electically-actuated propellers) would work, but would also wear away quickly and require frequent maintenance as losing control of a helicopter's main ...


19

I's like to expand the answers on how this could reduce vibrations, as it was mentioned in a comment. Therefore, I'd like to look at something completely different: When computers were equipped with faster and faster CD-ROM drives, the reduction of vibrations caused by small imbalances in the discs became more and more important. The solution is is shown ...


14

There are a few reasons for assembling the blades loosely in the gas turbine engine. The loose attachment of the fan blades allow for the easy installation/removal of the fan blades. Though the blades are loose while the blades are stationary, as the engine start spinning, the centrifugal force pushes the blades out and as a result, they will not be so ...


14

Their main advantage is higher strength at elevated temperatures. With elevated I mean temperatures up to 1200°C, which is what you will find in modern, film-cooled high-performance turbines where the gas temperature is even a few hundred centigrades higher than that. Steel would melt and other materials like titanium would quickly oxidize, and only nickel ...


13

Because it would be too complicated (and failure prone) compared to the present system and would offer no great advantages. First, for all the complexity in the helicopter upper controls, the principle is pretty simple- Align the rotor plane with the (rotating) swash plate, and tilt (or rise) it according to requirements. Source: helistart.com This system ...


13

Turbine Blade The turbine blade (part number 1475M35P01) is from the High Pressure Turbine (HPT) a CFM56-3 according to this ATSB report on performance testing of the engine. The report contains several images of blades which look similar to your photos. Compressor blade A search on locatory.com for the part number (B778503) lists the description as C-3 ...


11

We don't yet know how or why the engine casing failed to contain the fan blade on Southwest 1380. But yes: Not only are the engines designed to contain blade failures at fan red-line speeds, but they are also required by 14 CFR 33.94 to confirm they do, typically via destructive "blade-off testing." (There are a number of good videos of this testing online: ...


9

I went on a little search on my university library database, and found a review paper. I'm not sure if you can access it without paying. Active rotor control for helicopters: individual blade control and swashplateless rotor designs by Ch. Kessler. Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13272-011-0001-0 There, I extracted three sources relevant to your question:...


9

The bell shaped lift distribution has been used on the Horten flying wings in order to reduce lift at the outer, rearward parts of the wing for stability and better controllability. The fan blade of a jet engine has no need for a tailored reduction in lift towards the tips; instead it tries to maximize the thrust from the available area. The wavy shape is ...


8

Never say never, but that's not a prop malfunction that I've heard of or that was ever addressed in the turboprops that I've flown. We had various prop malfunctions, but the ways that things could fail that we considered would pretty much leave all blades in the same place. So without claiming that it could not, ever, ever, no way no how, not in all ...


8

The part number on the turbine blade shows it comes from a CFM56-3 series (Boeing 737 classic). No hits on the compressor blade, but it looks similar to one from the same engine.


6

The rotor works by accelerating air downwards, therefore creating an upward reaction force on the blades that lifts the craft. The lift force is equal to $$L = \dot{m}\Delta v$$ where $\dot{m}$ is mass flow rate through the rotor and $\Delta v$ is the change of speed of the air. To accelerate the air to that speed, it has to give it kinetic energy. This ...


5

There are two primary modes of turbine blade failure, that can be predicted, and hence are used to determine the lives of turbine blades at which they need to be replaced. One is called "creep". The Wikipedia article describes the basic mechanism. The life of the blade is purely a function of "time at temperature". If the blades experiences flight time ...


5

Perhaps the most important resource for airfoil data is the NACA (the predecessor of NASA) Report No.824 Summary of Airfoil Data by Abbott, Von Doenhoff and Stivers. This report contains the description, generation and experimental data like variation of lift, drag and moment coefficients with angles of attack for a number of NACA airfoils. You can also ...


5

The number of (main rotor) blades in a helicopter are dependent on a number of parameters; Usually there are some major issues with having a large number of blades in a helicopter though: One main reason is efficiency- In general, lesser the blades, more efficient the system- as it changes the momentum of more air mass i.e. accelerates more air by a lesser ...


5

I checked out your original post, and the Quora post referenced in it. The thing is that what is mentioned there is simple impulse dynamics: there is a magic disk with no drag that accelerates air going through it. It's a theory that works if you realise the limitations, allows for quick ROM estimations, and can provide even more useful info when some drag ...


5

" However, two Osprey 38-foot rotors weigh 4,654 lbs (JANE's, 1998-9, p. 557.)" this quote is from http://www.freepatentsonline.com/8382030.html That would put the mass of a single V22 rotor at 1050 kg. The quoted source dates from 1998, so some improvements may have been made, but it is unclear to which parts of the rotor this refers, so it's only a ...


4

Development is in progress, just a matter of time: Source: Helicopters are quieter (translation by Google)


4

Second question first, the higher the jet engine thrust, the more efficient it is (in terms of thrust for fuel rate, bang for buck). (Source: Boeing) On to the Trent 900 and PW6000, the big one and small one. The bigger fan will have slower RPM. From the type certificates the max permissible RPM's are 2818 (takeoff) and 6350 (undefined), respectively. The ...


4

This is a delayed reply. Your fan blade is made of Ti 8-1-1. The gage code is GE however there are only two manufacturers for this fan blade since 1965. The original manufacturer was Utica Drop Forge which became Kelsey Hayes and later became Utica Corporation and currently known as TECT Corporation. The other manufacture was Sermatech Mexico for a very ...


4

Short answer: Low pressure compressor air can be used for turbine cooling, but usually it can only be used to cool the low pressure turbine. For the HPT, you need cooling air from the HPC. This is because the cooling air must come from a location in the compressor that is a higher pressure than the part of turbine it is cooling, so it will actually flow ...


3

Propeller blades or rotor blades are like wings: They move through the air, and when they have the right angle of attack, they bend the air back- (in case of a propeller) or downwards (in case of the helicopter). On a wing, this causes downwash, on a propeller this causes prop blast. Both are really the same. Air gets a kick in a direction orthogonal to the ...


3

The stationary compressors are responsible for guide the air particles flow to the next compressor or stage with an even air flow on the engine's longitudinal axis, taking under consideration angle adjustments in order to avoid air turbulence with may cause a compressor stall. So, depending of the engine project, the answer is yes. The angle can variate, ...


3

I don't think it's accurate to say that the desired thrust is the same along the entire blade. For a large turbofan blade like the one in your image, the outer part is designed to act more like a propeller (efficient for the bypass air) while the inner part is designed to act more like a compressor (efficient for the core). You're not incorrect in stating ...


3

Plane moving forward plus blade moving down gives us a combined velocity vector, shown above in red. Relative air(speed) is still coming from ahead—but this now no longer concerns the propeller as it has its own velocity vector. Tilt your head (or check right image to avoid neck injury) and you'll see the blade's angle-of-attack. Remember, air (shown above ...


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