Hot answers tagged

43

Having a small bird in a cockpit, or anywhere on board, would not be a problem during a normal flight because a normal flight should have a wide safety margin. However, a situation can change extremely rapidly from safe-and-normal to heavy workload to full-emergency due to any number of factors, including weather, mechanical issues, airspace/congestion, etc....


27

Birds regularly experience up 10-14 G according to this website. After looking at how birds and insects fly, scientists came up with the conclusion as to how birds cope with this is because: Animals will always have some advantages over machines, such as the ability to use their nervous systems to sense subtleties about the environment around them and ...


26

If it's a small bird bedded down quietly under the jumpseat, I don't think I'd worry about it too much. Presuming that you found out about it while up at altitude, the question is, are you safer cruising for XX minutes to get to your destination, descend, and land, or are you safer cruising for a shorter time while you return to your departure airport, ...


24

I think the answer depends on what the birds are doing, but all options are basically "at the pilot's risk" - the tower is just advising you there are some birds hanging around the airport, but nobody can say how they're going to react to you trying to land there too. If the flock is airborne and flying across the final (completely neglecting to coordinate ...


23

The airspeed of a hot air balloon is always... zero. So it's completely up to the bird to do the avoiding. Which shouldn't be too difficult for the bird, on account of this humongous giant brightly coloured monster thing floating in its way. Ya gotta be a pretty dumb or drunk bird to run into one.


14

The FAA has an FAQ on bird strikes and other wildlife hazards, which includes a (broken) link to their Wildlife Hazard Management at Airports - A Manual for Airport Personnel document. Chapter 9 is called "WILDLIFE CONTROL STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES AT AIRPORTS" and includes the following techniques: Change flight schedules Modify the birds' habitat (food, ...


13

about.com has a good article which lists the many methods that are used to scare birds away from airports. It includes: Modify the habitat: Remove sources of food, such as seed-bearing plants, use insecticides to eliminate insects as a food source, remove bushes and plants that can be used for nesting The use of visual devices (lasers) or audio (sonic ...


9

Would one be able to tell the difference before landing? Not likely in many scenarios. Case 1: Bird hits windshield: blood & guts are immediately visible. Drone hits windshield, cracks are visible but not much else. The crew CAN immediately figure out, if they've ever see a birdstrike on the windshield, that this was something else. (Of course, it ...


9

I've got over 100 hours in balloons, crewed for around 200 more flights and used to work at a hot air balloon MRO. I have never noticed or heard of a bird strike or seen any damage from one. I have had multiple mid-air collisions with other balloons. Have seen a balloon with bullet holes (from someone who thought it would pop) and many other tears and rips. ...


8

There are hundreds of tests that need to be performed for certification of a turbine engine. The FAA requirements and tests are listed in CFR part 33 E and F. Amongst them are: Maximum static thrust tests Vibration tests Endurance tests Water ingestion test Hail ingestion test Ice cloud test Bird strike test A number of them can be seen in this video of ...


8

The F-35 is a plane that relies on safety via stealth, rather than armor. The F-35 fuselage can be dented much like any other plane. The F-35 uses a variety of methods to reduce the its radar signature, most of which revolve around the "skin" of the fuselage - the way the fuselage is physically shaped is meant to reduce the reflection of radar, and there are ...


8

I've never heard of other birds than albatrosses do dynamic soaring, but since this is over land, it can be simpler ridge soaring—as the sea breezes hits the shore (and obstacles on it), it turns upwards and the birds simply fly in this updraft. They are flying against the wind and gliding down relative to it, but when you add the speed of the wind, they may ...


7

The closest I know of are several attempts to build models of pterosaurs. Since the head with its long beak is ahead of their center of gravity, the configuration is statically unstable in yaw and needs continuous control corrections. On the other hand, this instability provides very quick responses. This YouTube movie contains footage of a Pterodactyl ...


7

A small drone, like those commercially available, is not much bigger than your average raptor or even a goose, but the material it's made of is much harder. Not very many geese have aluminum shoulders affixed with stainless-steel screws and supporting carbon-fiber wing struts. As such, a drone will do much more damage to the turbine blades (or the windshield ...


6

No two bird strikes are the same when it comes to engine parameters, we can look at this incident. Bird strike in both engines, yet only one showed above-normal EGT. In a jet engine, the bypass air assists in cooling, damage will disrupt this air flow. The core might still be running, or flammables (oil, fuel, etc.) might leak and catch fire. In an ...


6

On a visit to Blackpool Airport control tower a few years ago, they mentioned that they flew a hawk/falcon (not sure which) every day to deter birds


6

AIM 7−4−1. Migratory Bird Activity a. Bird strike risk increases because of bird migration during the months of March through April, and August through November. b. The altitudes of migrating birds vary with winds aloft, weather fronts, terrain elevations, cloud conditions, and other environmental variables. While over 90 percent of the reported bird ...


5

Do they happen as frequent as planes? Here is a link to the Federal Aviation Administration's Wildlife Strike database. Here you can search all the recorded wildlife strikes in the USA, and filter them by various things, including Engine Type. To get a good idea of how many helicopter bird strikes occur in comparison to other aircraft, we can compare how ...


5

My guess is it is an urban legend. Ground based weather radar have been used track and analyse behaviour of birds. Part of this research was done with the radar in fixed beam mode to record individual wing beat frequencies for species identification, keeping the bird in the radar beam. If the birds would be scared away by the beam this research would be ...


5

Slotted wingtips provide torsional flexibility. A bird’s wingtip feathers must twist in one direction during the upstroke of the wings and in the other direction during the downstroke to keep the local wind striking the wing at an appropriate angle to generate lift and thrust... The turning could be done at the base, with a completely inflexible feather; ...


4

There are multiple various requirements, for instance: After "swallowing" a smallish goose (formally up to 3.65kg) the engine must still pull at least half of the thrust for at least 14 minutes, and must not become dangerous for the plane (no fire, no uncontained failure). After ingesting a flock of ducks (16 birds no more than 0.85kg each) the engine must ...


4

They function like an array of winglets. Each feather is aligned to optimize its angle of attack in the local flow, which is circulating from the bottom to the top around the tip, to extract energy from the circulating flow, weakening the circulation (by redirecting it the other way - a wing deflects air to make lift) and providing a beneficial lift/thrust ...


3

From 'The Simple Science of Flight', by Henk Tennekes, MIT Press https://mitpress-request.mit.edu/sites/default/files/titles/content/9780262513135_sch_0001.pdf


3

The airport authorities use a number of techniques to manage the hazard of bird strike in and near airports. These include, Elimination of bird habitats- Birds usually come to the airport area due to the availability of food sources. Denial of food to birds by eliminating the sources (like landfills, garbage, crops, dumps etc) will reduce the chance of ...


3

The easy answer is that they create more lift during take-off because the bird is heavier. Like aircraft, birds shed some mass during flight when their metabolism converts food to energy. Unless the bird picks up some prey during the flight, it will weigh less during the following landing and will also create less lift. But from now on I will interpret your ...


3

A number of experiments and papers by Robert Hoey (from the early 1990s on) have used models of flat-winged soaring birds such as ravens. One of his papers is referenced in this broad review: Lentink & Biewener 2010 One of his earlier papers is copied here: Hoey, 1992, American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics The topics include some ...


3

The answer is yes. The damage done and to what extent the airplane’s RCS was compromised depends on the type of bird that hit, the location of the hit, the speed at which the impact took place and the total damage done. Birdstrike can puncture holes in airframes, shatter canopies, damage engines and wreak all kinds of havoc. If this compromises the shape ...


2

The biggest problem you face in a propeller aircraft when going through a flock of birds is instant IFR. You don't want to do that on landing. I had the experience of a flock of Canadian geese taking off as I was committed to takeoff while soloing as a student pilot. It was a spectacular mess, right out of a Friday the 13th Movie (or Indiana Jones). I had ...


2

The best option is to go around. Maybe the noise of you passing overhead will scare them into the air and they will land elsewhere.


2

I don't know about birds but researchers have been working for a long time to replicate insect flight. This article talks about how 3D printing has made this much easier. It has a video of a working replica hovering. They call it an ornithopter. Technically "ornitho-" means "bird," but I guess entomopter didn't have the right ring to it. I remember reading ...


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