35

V-tails have been fashionable in the Fourties and Fifties, and the claim was that they would cause less drag than an equally effective conventional tail. This has two reasons: Average chord length is longer, so the Reynolds number of the airflow is higher, causing relatively less friction drag. Instead of three surface-fuselage-joints, the V-tail has only ...


19

Because those trees will kill them If you look at this document regarding the Bonanza G36 performance you will note that the lowest stall speed written is 61 kts. 61 kts is 112 kph or 71 mph. We can assume they were going a little bit faster than that but let us say 110 kph / 70 mph. In that clip, they are just barely keeping airborne. This means the ...


17

V-tail production ceased in 1982. Possibly due to a perception that they were less safe than a conventional empennage. The model 35 Bonanza series (1947-1982) had a V-tail The model 36 Bonanza series (1968-present) had a conventional tail. There was a self-serving faction in general aviation, though, that went on a crusade to demonize the V-tail because ...


16

The V-Tail Bonanza design was retired (for a bunch of reasons, many of them marketing-related), but the actual airframe of a modern Beech 36 Bonanza is, essentially, the same as the 1968 Beech 36 (and very similar to the 1959 Debonair, just stretched). You can trace a great deal of the design and parts back to the V-tail as well. There have been some ...


10

In the Bonanza, a mechanical mixer controls ruddervator movement based on pitch and yaw commands. Here's a typical V-tail mixer (this is not of a Bonanza though): (source: eaa1000.av.org) There are two rods extending off to the left of this photo that connect to the actual ruddervators. Rightward motion of the top rod (due to either rightward motion of ...


9

They Trimmed the Margins to Zero In this video, the aircraft takes off and flies a straight course through the trees and continues a shallow climb out. To the uninitiated, this may appear innocuous, until one realizes that the aircraft was performing at it's maximum limits with near zero room for error. The voice and narration of this video does a good ...


8

A paragraph in Flying the Beech Bonanza explains the ruddervator operation: The following facts from the Shop Manual for the V35B illustrate how the control mixer and ruddervator stops allow differential ruddervator displacement. With full up elevator and no rudder input, the left ruddervator will be 22 1/2 degrees up. With full right rudder and ...


6

What makes it scary is just how close they did come to an accident. They attempted a takeoff using the performance calculations listed in the POH on a hot day at high field elevation. That’s fine assuming EVERYTHING works out just like the book ie no errors in calculating performance, aircraft and engine in peak condition, field atmospherics, perfect short ...


6

@acpilot is right- the Jaguar version of Beechcraft Bonanza differs only in the paint job and interiors. AOPA had run an article when the Jaguar versions were introduced: Like the Jaguar edition of the Beech King Air C90B offered last year, the Bonanza and Baron will have specially outfitted interiors and unique paint schemes. ... Seats in the Jaguar ...


6

The technical stuff in other answers is right. The other difference is that the V-tailed Bonanza's tended to 'fishtail' slightly in the cruise. If I recall correctly, V-tails are not as spin resistant as conventional tails. My dad flew a Standard Austria for a time (early V-tail sailplane) and it was very definitely prohibited from intentional spinning. ...


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