27

Originally there was no instrument at this place, except for UE series with an electrically driven artificial horizon, where there was a fast erect pushbutton/indicator for the copilot gyro. According to Wikipedia, UD series is for the military model and UE series is for 1900D, so I assume UC series is for 1900C model. Instrument panel for series UA/UB/UC: ...


19

I would say that it is a reasonably safe aircraft, but, like most aircraft of that class, often operated in unsafe conditions. The Wikipedia page does not have description for many of the listed accidents, but you can turn to the Aviation Safety Network which does. There are 41 total hull losses listed there. From them: Most common type of accident is ...


8

Well, those fins were put there to increase yaw and pitch stability on the D version because of the change in the centre of gravity due to a higher fuselage from the C version. This D model also had more powerful engines than the C model. To add on, the strakes at the bottom were added for the same reason too. More info can be found here.


6

It's a missing instrument because it's not part of the standard avionics of the 1900C model but part of the Beechcraft's 1900D aircraft avionics. If you take a look at pages 0 and 1 of 31-10-00-01 (chapter 31, section 10, unit 00, figure 01) of the Beechcraft 1900D aircraft's IPC (Illustrated Parts Catalog),¹ you'll notice that the hole featured on the ...


3

The Beech 1900 aircraft was a sound, well made commuter aircraft; now the list of accidents is misleading. Reviewing the list finds many occurring while the aircraft is being used for bush flying in extreme parts of the globe. This is not surprising considering a lot of bush flying involve operating out of remote airports in extreme temperature ranges, ...


3

Some of the answers are referring to the dual aft strakes on the underside of the fuselage below the tail. The dual aft strakes are Indeed there to increase stability, specifically for one engine operations. They remove the yaw damper limitation. To answer the question, the 1900 has the same horizontal stabilizer as a King Air 200. Obviously the 1900 is ...


3

Yes that is what is the most cost effective solution after flight testing has demonstrated that the vertical tail surface has to be increased for instance. The little winglets at the end of the horizontal tail do increase aerodynamic efficiency of the stab - plus they just look cool. The BAe 125 stuck a bit of fin on top of the original fin design, the ...


2

According to the Transportation Safety Board of Canada when they conducted an investigation into a Beechcraft 1900D overrunning a runway in 1997, they found out that the AFM does not include that information you request, nor was it available to the pilots. The snow-covered, slippery condition of the occurrence runway differed from the bare, dry surfaces ...


2

It is an HF (High Frequency) antenna. It is used for aircraft to communicate on overseas flights. VHF (Very High Frequency) airband radios are used for normal local and cross country flights. For a radio to transmit effectively, the internal components of the radio and the external (to the radio) antennae both have to match the frequency used for the ...


2

It’s a high-frequency antenna, used mostly on flights traveling across seas and oceans, where there tends to be areas without VHF and UHF coverage. This was the case on older aircraft, most newer ones have a smaller hidden one on the tail-fin.


1

I flew the 1900D. We had 20 of them in the fleet but there wasn’t a gauge or hole there.


1

The best guess that an outsider can make is that the designers discovered the aircraft needed more lateral stability. This is also apparent by the fact that the 1900D has larger ventral fins (the 2 vertical surfaces that extend below the aft fuselage) than the earlier models since it has a taller fuselage (and therefore taller cabin), in order to allow ...


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