New answers tagged

1

"Lock-on" just refers to a unit receiving multiple different response signals in response to its interrogation broadcasts, scanning for the signal it's looking for, and when it finds the signal who's encoding matches its channel selection, it starts to process that signal and ignores all others. It's locked on to that signal.


6

The F-16's manual is declassified since it's in service in many countries. AOA Indexer The answer is yes, the switch (lever) is conveniently located on the gauge. From said manual: AOA Indexer (...) A dimming lever, located on the left side of the indexer, controls the intensity of the lighted symbols. And here's a photo from airliners.net (...


13

Although the accepted answer is basically correct, as an additional backup source of power (for hydraulics or electric, depending on the aircraft), there can be a Ram air turbine (RAT - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_air_turbine) that can be deployed in a failure of both primary and secondary energy sources. It uses the airflow from the airplane's speed ...


17

This is somewhat dependent on the aircraft of course, so I will focus on the Boeing 737 NG series as an example of a typical airliner. Details will differ with other aircraft, but the general concept should be the same. When there is loss of thrust on both engines, both engine driven generators will stop providing power. The battery will take over powering ...


8

Actual details vary between aircrafts. But in general, the battery can supply essential systems for some time and then APU/RAT/... should kick in.


4

You have to realize that the DME is a justified and ancient nav system. When it was concieved, it was chosen to keep it simple, for obvious reasons. As it is, it does not have to communicate with any other system, making it a very reliable stand alone device. There is no need to create a "DME 2.0", we already have gps and other more sophisticated systems ...


12

There's no accurate and simple way to know the height above the station in order to do the calculation with the existing equipment. Altitude is not an indicator as the DME station may be above sea level. If your airplane is at 15,000ft and the station is at sea level you'll get one answer, if the station is at 10,000ft you'd get a completely different result,...


5

This does exist, and is used by US military aircraft. It's called a Self-contained Approach (SCA) or Independent Precision Radar Approach (IPRA). The primary user of these approaches is Air Force Special Operations Command on aircraft like the MC-130 and AC-130. Regulatory guidance is contained in the AFI 11-202v3 AFSOC Sup, section 7.4, and operational ...


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