41

I did it in 17 days - start to finish. Did flight school in Arizona. Before I went, I got the PPL study guide, MS Flight Simulator complete with a yoke, pedals, and throttle quadrant... and put in dozens of hours just learning the instrument scan and practicing virtual stuff. When I got to the flight school, I already knew the parts of the plane, and ...


31

Two reasons: The airplane is extremely versatile, while having adequate performance, and is a good choice when a small airforce needs a do-everything airplane to replace multiple types. Being designed for carriers, it's overbuilt for normal land operations in many key areas, which means a longer airframe structural life in its much easier life landing on ...


23

Wanting to replace the Dassault Mirage III, and after considering multiple fighters from multiple nations, it boiled down to the F-16 and F/A-18. The F-16 had engine issues, inferior radar, no long-range missiles and BVR capability, single engine, and was technologically immature at the time. Note: There were concerns that the larger more sophisticated F-...


19

The absolute minimum would be about 45 hours. The FAA requires 40 hours of flight time, the completion of an aeronautical knowledge course, a written test, and a flight test. This assumes that you can read and memorize all the necessary aeronautical knowledge in an hour and a half. In the realm of humans who like to eat and sleep and actually learn and such,...


16

Selection of the replacement of the Mirage III was of course carefully considered by the RAAF, and the most suitable airframe was considered for the mission and circumstances typical for a vast, distant and sparsely populated continent: The fact that it was designed for carrier operation actually was a plus, since it results in a more robust airframe with ...


14

I go once or twice a week if the weather holds and I'm up to almost 8 months (and I am still not done (PPL)). I work with a guy who religiously went 3 days a week and said he got it done (at a part 61 school) in 6 months (almost exactly). The limiting factors are of course money (which does not sound like you are worried about if you are planning an ...


13

Given the location of the snake from the photos/video in the article and the height of the wing/engine assembly (as shown below) I think it's entirely possible to miss this critter in preflight. A visual inspection of the control surfaces is certainly a part of the preflight, but unlike on a small aircraft (say a Piper Cherokee or Cessna 172) you will ...


11

You need to sit down with an instructor, rather than an internet message board, if you are seriously considering such a proposition as this. Hopefully the instructor can talk you into a little more use of careful, cautious, wise thinking instead of a focus on what you term as "quick thinking". There is a place for thinking quickly in aviation, but there is ...


10

Yes, at least in the US it is completely reasonable to do it in 2-3 months. I believe you can achieve this easily in a month's time if you're doing it full time. The following applies to the US, where I'm most familiar with the rules. The process in the US as an alien is as follows: Find a flight school and notify them that you'd like to begin flight ...


10

The number of flight attendants required on flights are mandated by international safety regulations. For planes with up to 19 passenger seats, no flight attendant is needed. For larger planes, one flight attendant per 50 passenger seats is needed.—Wikipedia Eight cabin crew is enough. 377/50 is 7.54.


9

I am Australian and I hope I can help. Firstly, you don't need to fly through a university. There are hundreds of private flight schools here which are of great quality, and very few of them are associated with a university. More and more international airlines are sending cadet pilots to our schools. Most of them offer theory courses in addition to the ...


7

The Wednesday flight was indeed delayed for a full day as was suggested in a comment.


7

I have both US and Australian PPLs, and having flown VFR in both countries, there are some real differences in the VFR charts and supplemental data available. Mostly the contents are fairly evident but if you are unfamiliar with a specific type of VFR chart, it is important to look over the chart in detail to make sure you understand it. The US publishes ...


7

If you are talking about Europe (EASA) Doc 1178 states at PPL privileges: a) The privileges of the holder of a PPL(A) are to act without remuneration as PIC or co-pilot on aeroplanes or TMGs engaged in non-commercial operations. (b) Notwithstanding the paragraph above, the holder of a PPL(A) with instructor or examiner privileges may receive ...


6

For the U.S., career options for someone with a private pilot certificate can be summed up as "stuff that doesn't involve flying an aircraft." It is illegal to be paid for your services as a pilot in the U.S. without a commercial pilot certificate. The flight instruction exemption mentioned above for Europe does not apply in the U.S. All CFIs in the U.S. are ...


6

The answer to your question, is yes and no. CAR 92 (1) states that: An aircraft shall not land at, or take-off from, any place unless: ... (d) the place... is suitable for use as an aerodrome for the purposes of the landing and taking-off of an aircraft; and, having regard to all the circumstances of the proposed landing or take-off (including the ...


5

Why a carrier-capable plane over a land-based plane? Australia has a history of operating carrier craft beginning in the 1920s. At the moment there are two helicopter carriers in the Royal Australian Navy, but no full-deck carriers since the retirement of HMAS Melbourne in 1982. However, Australia is surrounded by a lot of water, and lacks land borders ...


4

Only citizens of a country can apply in the government jobs (including armed forces) of that country. There can be some exceptions but I hardly doubt that a foreigner can be hired or trained for any position in military which has access to classified information. Being a fighter pilot even has more restrictions. Royal Australian Air Force does not hire any ...


4

Getting your instructor certificate is your best bet. Beyond that, there are jobs out there for traffic watch, banner towing, and flying jump planes for skydivers. Also glider towing and sightseeing. Ferry flying is possible, although I'd be careful of any place that would hire you with very few hours -- they may be cutting corners & guys with more ...


4

For Australia, you are extremely confined as to what you can do with a PPL to earn money. Skywriting as people have mentioned, will probably mean you lose your license here. What you can do according to CAR 2.7 (Civil Aviation Regulation) is essentially; Crop Dusting on a person's property using their aircraft (only on their property) (You would also ...


4

A few comments: The older you are the longer it takes. A generalisation yes, but I've been teaching people to fly for a few years and like it or not the spotty teenager wins every time over the old and wise! Flights of more than about an hour or an hour-and-a-half become counter-productive. Lots of short flights are far better than long sessions. Your mind ...


3

Regarding possibility to do it in 2-3 months time, yes a PPL is quite possible, but a Ground study before even the course starts will allow a much better experience. I'm an aerospace engineer, and had flown flight simulators a lot, before joining the PPL course. In my experience, ground instructions were more about chatting with the instructor on ideas, ...


3

I'm not super sure about Australia, but in general terms, I know that it can take a lot of time to get from a regular license to being a commercial jet pilot. The first step is to get your private pilots license. So I'd find a program to get that taken care of. Then you're going to want to look for programs that get you a commercial rating (which simply ...


3

According to the CASA AOC Handbook, section 15.3.1.2, pilots do need to have specific training. Most of this training is regarding engine failures and emergency landings, in some situations in IMC. CASA requires that all ASETPA operators have a training and checking organisation. The CASA Inspector will verify that for ASETPA operator’s the ...


3

2000 is common but that depends on the engine. The official TBO is what ever the TC/manufacture states, here is the list for of the Lycomings published by Lycoming and here is the continental list. These are manufacturer recommended TBO's and are presumably based on data and tests they have run but they are in the end an estimate and usually reflect a ...


3

For the "and others", the documents from Finland have become public as the secrecy period of 25 years has recently been passed. In a major military deal, there are always technological, economical and political aspects. There were five candidates: Russian MIG-29 Swedish JAS 39 Gripen French MIRAGE 2000-5 General Dynamics F-16 (USA) McDonnell Douglas F/A-...


2

An RPL requires less training (i.e. money) but is more restricted in how far you can fly, how many passengers you can carry and how heavy the aircraft can be. You can get an endorsement to fly anywhere domestically; there is no endorsement available to fly internationally or for the other two restrictions, nor is an instrument rating available. A PPL allows ...


2

Nobody can tell you every single operator who might hire you. There are a couple of operators that I personally know have hired low-time pilots, like Merimbula Air Services or Polar Aviation. But what I want to do here is give you some strategies that could help you land your first job: 1) Don't stop training Passed the CPL Flight Test? Great! Now do more....


2

First of all, I just want to reiterate that you should absolutely follow the advice in Ralph's answer. That is, learn to make good (wise, prudent) aeronautical decisions and talk to an actual instructor. Don't do risky things just to "practice quick thinking." That's how you end up dead. Now, to actually answer the question regarding the lowest safe ...


2

An Aeronautical License issued by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is required in order to operate a handheld aviation-band VHF transceiver in Australia. An aeronautical licence is issued to authorise a station that: is not fixed to an aircraft; is operated on aeronautical frequencies; is operated for purposes relating ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible