Hot answers tagged

24

It is the ram air intake for the air conditioning system. There are two of them, one on each side. Here is an image from the ATR-72 FCOM: ATR-72 Air conditioning System, image from 737ng.co.uk Details from the same document: The air conditioning system is supplied by air processed through two packs which regulate air flow and temperature. The two packs are ...


20

ATR-72, 16 October 2013, Lao Airlines Flight 301 The probable cause of this accident were the sudden change of weather condition and the flight crew's failure to properly execute the published instrument approach, including the published missed approach procedure, which resulted in the aircraft impacting the terrain. ATR-42, 19 October 2013, P2-PXY,...


8

By Julien.scavini (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons The ATR72 is quite a bit longer than the ATR42, and has several more windows to allow for more passengers. According to Wikipedia: The ATR 72 was developed from the ATR 42 in order to increase the maximum seating capacity (from 48 to 78) by stretching the fuselage by 4.5 metres (15 ft), ...


7

It is a tail stand, also called as pogo stick and is used in the aircraft during loading/unloading. It is basically a stick, which is carried around in the aircraft and attached to the rear fuselage using a pin during loading/unloading operations, as can be seen in the image below. Air Dolomiti ATR 72-212A (I-ADLS) - Removeable tail stand installed at the ...


6

The ATR icing problem was 25 years ago. I'm sure you'll make it safely by this point.


5

To start, the FH timer starts when the aircraft takes off (weight-off-wheels) and stops when the aircraft lands (weight-on-wheels). This means that whether the engine is in hotel mode or running for taxi, the aircraft (and the DC Gen) are not accumulating FHs. One thing to consider is the difference between an engine hour (EH) and a flight hour. Engines ...


5

It appears to be a pogo stick (you'll find your picture used in the linked answer) and is a precautionary support for the tail to prevent it from tipping over when loading and unloading.


5

As other answers note, for most aircraft, the risk of the engines ingesting FOD while powering back is too high. This is particularly true for turbofan engines mounted under the wings. Turboprop engines tend to be mounted on high wings (such as on the ATR-72), and they tend to serve smaller airports where an airline may not have tugs available for pushback. ...


4

Just about any turboprop or piston engine airplane with reversing propellers can do it, as the airplane doesn't care whether BETA reverse is being used on the ramp or a taxiway or a runway. You normally use DISCING (flat prop blades to make zero thrust) when taxiing when you want slow down or when you are stopped. To go backwards, you just move the powers ...


4

Pushback via reverse thrust is problematic for turbofans, as they kick up lots of debris, which could be ingested into the engine or hit something laying around. Presumably the ATR as a turboprop doesn't create as much wind, and with a turboprop the reverse thrust is blowing from the front of the engine, so there's no chance the debris will reach the ...


4

More of an issue of pilot training, weather, safety of the airline and the country's regulator in general. ATRs are popular in regions that encompass many islands, hence the application in Southeast Asia. Some of these airlines are "poor" so they cannot afford to operate larger jet aircraft, nor would operating such an aircraft make sense in economical terms ...


4

There are two coefficients which determine the forces needed to deflect a control surface (besides the physical parameters like area and dynamic pressure): Change in control surface hinge moment coefficient $c_r$ with angle of attack $\alpha$ : $c_{r\alpha}=\frac{\delta c_r}{\delta\alpha}$ Change in control surface hinge moment coefficient $c_r$ with ...


4

Flying Magazine reviewed headsets for pilots back in 2013 and four years ago there were already bluetooth-capable headsets in the market from Bose, David Clark, Sennheiser and Lightspeed. You might want to start there...


4

A ram air inlet for reducing the heat of the Primary and Secondary Heat Exhangers caused by the bleed air coming from the PACK Valve (Primary XCGR) and from ACM Compressor part (Secondary XCGR). It is usually ventilated by 2 means: RAM AIR if the speed is > 150kts or Ground cooling turbofan (operated by bleed air coming from Pneumatic system) if the speed ...


4

The FCOM says "tail strike may occur if pitch attitude exceed 8° during the flare depending upon vertical speed at touch down" (Ctrl + F "tail", matches 31 and 32).


4

It seems the dorsal fairing is already made of composite materials. See the images below. These components only receive aerodynamic loads and maybe unlikely yet possible foreing object impacts. (taken from this paper) (from google with "atr 72 tail fin fairing" keywords) From the below picture (from here) you can easily spot aluminium components ...


4

The loads on section of a dorsal fin are minor, just from the dynamic pressure of airflow that may be striking the panel from the side during yaw excursions in turbulence. It's a "lifting" surface, insofar as it's contributing to the restorative yaw moment being part of a stabilizing fin, but the loads aren't super high and it may even just be ...


4

As I understand it, pilot must pull the red handle and twist 90 degrees. This will stop the engine. Pilot must then press the discharge squib button in order to deploy the extinguishers. is this correct? Yes, this is correct, except that the handle does not need to be twisted as far as I know. When the handle is pulled, the following things will happen: ...


3

You can do powerbacks with basically any commercial turboprop, not really uncommon at all. We did it regularly with our F50s and we still performing it nowadays sometimes (even though quite rarely) with our DH8Ds when there is no towbar available. Never heard about the problem of ingesting FOD, we never experienced this. The only thing you have to be ...


2

Two actual photos of the electrical systems pages (AC and DC respectively). Hope it helps.


2

For me, it looks like the first picture is something like a screenshot. It looks real. (A bit blurred and pixelated) The second one looks like a graphic made in a graphics program. There can be small deviations from the original screen design, because it's only for informational purposes. The third one is a black/white graphic that is made for printing (in ...


2

LIMITATIONS PAGE : 001 APR 11 EASA APPROVED Model : 212 A AFM 1 2.01.01 | INTRODUCTION Observance of the limitations contained in this chapter is required by law. When operating in accordance with an approved appendix or supplement to this manual, the limitations of this basic Airplane Flight Manual section apply, except ...


1

Because the horn extends ahead of the hinge line, the slipstream tends to pull the rudder deeper into deflection. This reduces the amount of control force needed to work the rudder without servo-boosting it. This is called aerodynamic boost and can be used to boost the ailerons and the elevator as well.


1

If you're on a US commercial airline, then you have less chance of dying on a flight than you do doing anything else you can imagine, including sleeping in your bed at night. (A 75-year lifespan spends about 750,000 man-hours in bed, with one death in those hours. The deaths-per-flight-hour rate for US airlines is between 1/10th and 1/100th of that.) If the ...


1

Blaming flight crews is a standard procedure by almost all manufacturers. Steve Frederick, an ATR 72 pilot was one of the many that noticed loss of flight control problems in icing conditions and warned American Eagle but was ignored. A friend flying ATR 72's commented "I'll probably die on one of these planes", and did on American Eagle Flight 4184. The ...


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