Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

42

This is a simple versioning system used in ATIS (Automatic Terminal Information Service). ATIS messages contain information about the weather at the airport, runways in use etc. This information is transmitted on a dedicated radio frequency and repeated in a loop. The ATIS messages are updated frequently as the weather or operations at the airport change. ...


38

The general rule is: If you read it, it's true. If you hear it, it's magnetic. All charts and textual sources (METAR, TAF, winds aloft, surface analysis charts, etc) use true north as the reference. ATIS/AWOS/ASOS broadcasts, or any information a controller gives you over the radio, is magnetic. Wind direction broadcast over FAA radios is in reference ...


27

The ceiling is the lowest altitude where clouds cover more than half of the sky. This is important because climbing above that altitude means you will most likely have to fly through clouds. This makes navigation more difficult and pilots are required to have special training to fly in low visibility. If the ceiling is too low, pilots can't be at a safe ...


25

As far as METARs are considered, the wind direction gives the direction from which the wind is coming. From METAR definitions: Wind Direction. The direction, in tens of degrees, from which the wind is blowing with reference to true north. So, Wind 270 shows that the wind is coming from west. The reporting in ATIS and tower is the same, only ...


18

Wind numbers say where the wind is coming from. Wind 270 means that the wind is coming from the west, and blowing towards the east. If you point west (270), you will have the wind in your face as a headwind. If you point east (270 - 180 = 90), you will have a tailwind, or the wind at your back. Another way to think about this is if you want to take off from ...


12

I always use the old saying; The North wind doth blow, and we shall have snow... Since this saying originated in England and in England it is colder to the North, we can conclude that a North wind blows from the North. Incidentally, it is precisely the opposite with ocean currents. The Gulf Stream is a North-Easterly current, because if you are floating ...


9

There is no minimum definition of a "terminal" in and of itself. The "destination terminal" of a flight is simply its planned endpoint. That's usually, but not always, a man-made complex designed to facilitate human flight, which we call an airport. However, you can file a VFR flight plan to fly out to a friend's fallow field in BFE, miles from any airfield ...


8

By simply stating that both runways are in use. For example, "arriving and departing runway 16 left and 16 right."


6

I fly out of a controlled satellite class D (KLOU, Bowman Field) below a class C (KSDF, Louisville International) so I'm fairly familiar with this scenario, at least in the way that it's handled there. The short story - in my experience - is that Approach only cares about you having the numbers or ATIS for the airport where you'll actually land. First the ...


5

For the US From the FAA ATC manual: 2−9−3. CONTENT NOTE− [...] The ASOS Operator Interface Device (OID) displays the magnetic wind as “MAG WND” in the auxiliary data location in the lower left−hand portion of the screen. Other OID displayed winds are true and are not to be used for operational purposes. Which confirms the ATIS winds are ...


5

I think the BA/ references "Braking Action" in the ICAO D-ATIS sequence. Since the example report from LBTA (Istanbul Ataturk International Airport) does not suggest that a Braking Action value would be assigned (no rain, etc), it appears to be a placeholder for that information if it was provided. Below is an excerpt from Annex 11, to the publication - ...


5

The FAA has this handy chart to decode METARs (which are the printed version of the ATIS) and TAFs. Prevailing visibility; in U.S., Statute Miles & fractions; above 6 miles in TAF Plus6SM. (Or, 4-digit minimum visibility in meters and as required, lowest value with direction)


5

No, small airports almost never have ATIS. Many do, however, have an AWOS or ASOS. However, this is also not a requirement and many very small and/or private fields don't have any weather reporting at all. If any such system is present, its radio broadcast frequency will be listed on the sectional charts. When no weather reporting service is available at a ...


5

In Australia the full ATIS and identifier is available on the internet in text form (along with all the weather and NOTAMs) - but it is only available to pilots. The information is provided by Airservices Australia (which is basically our government-owned version of NATS) through their online service called NAIPS. NAIPS is free but to register you need an ...


5

The short and general answer is: No. The ATIS is only a VHF recording, but even when recorded digitally, it is not available in a text-base form in many cases which would allow being made public on the internet. In the case of D-ATIS, the information can only be obtained using ACARS, other systems such as CPDLC require special equipment. With modern ...


3

Airstrips provide at least a wind sock (or wind cone) to indicate direction and strength of the wind at ground level. A wind sock is required to operate even the tiniest strip, and as such provides the minimum level of weather information available - provided the pilot is close enough to be able to see it clearly. The specifications of this information ...


3

In Germany, most airfields that are equipped or certified for IFR operations will have an ATIS. In those cases were an airfield is not equipped with an ATIS, all weather information produced by the certified meteorological personnel at the airfield will be provided on the AFIS (Aerodrome Flight Information Frequency) frequency upon request. (Image Source: ...


3

In the US, ATIS info is typically updated hourly - unless something unusual/unpredicted happens that is relevant to approaching or departing aircraft. In the US, ATIS broadcasts include: Airport Name. Information letter (Alpha, Bravo, Charlie...). Time Hour/Minute in Zulu (GMT) when the observation was made Winds - direction, speed, and sometimes gusts, ...


3

The letters refer to ATIS information, which stands for Automatic Terminal Information Service. ATIS messages are broadcast on a loop on a separate frequency from approach and tower frequencies and inform pilots of weather conditions, active runways, runway conditions, and other important data. Each time the information changes a new recording is made and ...


2

ATIS is traditionally a voice recording of someone reading the weather. D-ATIS is a way to deliver the information digitally so onboard equipment can interact with it. From the requirements Digital ATIS is an enhancement of the Tower Data Link Service (TDLS) and uses the Pre-Departure Clearance (PDC) System microcomputer to automate the delivery of ...


2

In the US ATIS information isn't available on the internet. The tapes (or an equivalent written record) are retained like any other ATC communication though (3-4-2 item "k") and are available via FOIA requests if you have a pressing need for them. If all you're interested in is the weather most airports that are large enough to warrant an ATIS broadcast are ...


2

I dont know of a site that has it for every airport but this site has lots of live streaming ATC. It seems they have ATIS for some airports (I found it for JFK) but chances are they will only have it for the big airports however depending on where you fly out of you may get lucky. Again this is the actual audio feed so you will still need to listen to it.


1

As a pilot, you really want to know the wind direction on takeoff and landing. The reported direction will be where the wind is coming from, that is, opposite the direction the windsock is pointing. A good rule of thumb is that if the direction is reported in writing (METAR) then the bearing is relative to true north; if by voice (ATIS) then relative to ...


1

Dew point can most certainly be used for performance. High humidity can cause a longer take off roll. When combined with a high altitude airport and hot temps, it can be a struggle to get airborne. Cooler, less humid air is more dense--there's more "air" for the wing to bite into. So, a pilot listening to ATIS would want to know the temp, dew point, and ...


1

In the USA, this is defined in the FAA's Air Traffic Organization Policy, Section 2-9-1. According to that source, ATC must: (a) Identify each ATIS message by a phonetic letter code word at both the beginning and the end of the message. Automated systems will have the phonetic letter code automatically appended. Exceptions may be made where ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible