22

Absolutely (and not just civil ATC training - military as well). A large part of modern ATC training is simulator training. This is true for all types of ATC - area control, approach and aerodrome (tower). For area and approach, the simulator is fairly simple, since the essential bit is a radar screen and a screen with flight information. For tower, there ...


19

In fact: yes! Here in Germany the controller training starts off with much classroom lessons to learn the theoretical basics and only some sessions in the tower- or center simulator. During the training the amount of theoretical lessons decreases and the simulator sessions increase. The last few month consist of simulator sessions only, so it's a huge and ...


14

Not very realistic. it's text-based; no readbacks. there are no approach clearances. You can assign speed, altitudes, and headings, but there is no way to instruct an aircraft to execute a specific approach. there aren't, really, any missed approaches or go arounds no emergencies Basically, it' just a game of "keep the aircraft separated", but it ...


13

"Final" or "Final vector" is the position in charge of, well, final approach. It is a radar control position worked in the TRACON. As aircraft are transferred from the ARTCC to the Tracon, the Center (or Enroute) controller will tell them to contact the "Approach" controller. Everyone in the TRACON uses the callsign "...


13

As Digital Dracula says, it's just a game. The best way to experience something approaching the real deal is to join the VATSIM community. It's a virtual ATC system that integrates flight simulator players in a live dynamic ATC environment. It's much closer to the real thing because it's real people, some of whom are real controllers, and you can play it as ...


11

For civilian control towers and the assorted radar positions the answer is yes they're available. For the tower: (Image source + more info) Click image for high-res. The simulator consists of two modules: Radar control simulator to simulate air situation in area of any complexity level, size and intensity of air traffic; controller’s ...


7

It will be different at every airport and even at different times for the same airport, but if you’re looking for a simple rule to keep things reasonably realistic, I’d go with 1000-1500ft AGL; that’s seems to be when I usually hear it. If you want to make it annoyingly realistic, I’d say about 20-30 seconds at current climb rate before hitting the initial ...


6

So according to EASA, it is the AMCs/GM for Regulation 2015/340, Part ATCO.OR (Annex III to Decision 2015/10/R) and specifically in AMC1.ATCO.OR.C015(b)(b) where is specifies 11 criteria regarding STD standards, among them being accuracy of aircraft performance, voice recognition realism, equipment, data displays, etc: STD criteria If a synthetic ...


6

There is no standardized altitude rule for switching frequencies. This is done at the request of your current controller. If the airport is uncontrolled but you need to switch to a nearby ATC frequency for departure through controlled airspace you do so when you feel you are ready and/or when the local charts state you should do so because of airspace ...


5

I've played atc-sim for fun myself some time ago, and it can be a nice way to pass time. However, in terms of realism, it only simulates a very narrow range of the tasks real controllers have to do. It gives you a (very basic) idea of what vectoring is like, and that's it. I'd say probably about 5% of what a real controller has to do is simulated, and given ...


4

In addition to the above answers, the term final controller can also refer to the controller issuing instruction for a ground controlled approach, such as a PAR or ASR approach. Aircraft will get handed off to this controller before commencing the approach, and will receive lateral and/or vertical guidance depending on the equipment available for that runway....


3

I am not aware of specific regulations regarding ATC training simulators. ATC simulator training is usually done on an exact copy of the real system (same software & hardware). The radar data is provided by flight simulators which are operated by pseudo pilots (also called blip drivers). These are in 'radio contact' with the trainee. One pseudo pilot ...


3

I have already found answer for my problem. ACES and FACET from NASA Aviation System Division solve my problem. It should handle all statistical data, it has statistical output as well and it could also handle meteorological data. Currently this SW use FAA and some airline companies to modelate ATM concepts (aviationsystemsdivision.arc.nasa.gov). Thanks for ...


3

The entire world is divided into Flight Information Regions (FIRs), so in theory there is someone responsible for everywhere. However, those FIRs are then subdivided into different classes of airspace. Class A/B/C/D/E airspace is "controlled", meaning there should always be some sort of ATC available. In remote areas, though, ATC may not have radar ...


2

A Final (radar) controller in a TRACON provides instructions (e.g., radar vectors, speed adjustments, etc.) and an instrument approach clearance (if required) necessary to sequence, provide separation with other aircraft, and align the aircraft with the landing runway. Once this is done the pilot will be instructed to contact the Control Tower. Typically ...


2

I think you need to understand that airspace is divided vertically as well as horizontally. This image should help you picture it (from Australia, where Class B does not exist). Glass G airspace has no ATC interaction, and in Class E ATC interaction is only needed for IFR flights. When you picture airspace like this, most of the world is not covered by ATC,...


2

It helps to check prior research in that field, for example, VOCALISE: Assessing the impact of data link technology on the R/T channel (2005). Quantitative aspects of pilot-controller communication are addressed in two en-route air traffic control studies: the VOCALISE study in a real operational environment (Graglia and al., 2005), and the EEC study in a ...


1

The answer is yes, tower simulators are indeed used in civil ATC training. An example video of a professional ATC simulator can be seen here. It shows that not only tower control training is supported, but also ground control (executed from the tower cabin), approach, and area control. The student can be at various skill levels (to become a controller, to ...


1

My understanding is that a training provider needs approval from authorities for the full training program offered, and the simulator is only one part of this. The regulation 2015/340 lists areas to consider for the authorities, based on the authorities being competent to judge OK or not in the given context. Thus, a simulator can't get approval as such ...


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