18

Because passengers really don't like enduring that kind of deceleration on landing. Scares them. Injures them. And if Junior is playing with his seatbelt latch at the wrong moment, there's a real risk of a fatal injury. And because you still need the runways for any aircraft not equipped with this equipment, and for takeoffs. If the Air Force doesn't want ...


16

They're made of alloy steels that have ultra-high strength, high fracture toughness, excellent fatigue resistance, and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Based on one of the manufacturers—QuesTek—the steel's grade is AMS 6516. The 6xxx grade is a chromium-vanadium steel: Chromium-vanadium steel refers to steel alloys incorporating carbon, ...


14

The hook is for emergency use at airports that have Runway Arrestor Systems. Lots of non-naval fighters have arrestor hooks for that purpose. Now, there is nothing stopping someone from landing an F-16 or any other fighter on a carrier deck and using its arrestor system, which works the same way. The main issues are the proficiency required to do it and ...


9

Yes the F-16 would be able to land on a carrier however it would most likely break/damage the landing gear and other components because it's not built for it. I am only assuming this, but I believe the net as shown in the picture could catch several non-naval aircraft including a F-16.


7

No, the F-16 cannot "carrier land", even with the tail hook. The Air Force jets (aside from any that are shared with the Navy) have tail hooks only for emergency purposes during landing, or securing the aircraft during engine run-up testing. The tail hooks are not designed to arrest an aircraft like it would for a carrier landing, the land-based arresting ...


7

The tailhook assembly on a modern carrier or terrestrial fighter has a hydraulic damping assembly which forces the hook to stay extended and dampens the impact of the hook into the runway or flight deck. Without it the hook would bounce off the deck on impact and potentially strike the tail of the aircraft. This was a major problem during early ship trials ...


6

Weight and cost. A tailhook landing puts a great deal of stress on an airframe, airplane structures would have to be reinforced along the frame to distribute the force across it and hold together. Airplane passenger seats would need 4 or 5 point safety harnesses to keep the passengers from getting injured on landing. All that adds weight, which reduces ...


3

In addition, to withstand carrier landings, planes with tail hooks have to be very stoutly constructed. This reduces their useful payload, something that commercial carriers want to avoid.


3

I don't know if you've seen videos of aircraft carrier landings, but: 1) They have to slam the aircraft into the ground to guarantee the hook will connect. The G forces from this and the subsequent rapid deceleration are too high for your grandma to cope with, so passenger numbers will fall, seatbelts need to be redesigned, and landing gear strengthened. 2)...


3

Something not yet mentioned is that the vertical speed typical of carrier operations is way higher than that for typical F-16 (or any non-naval type) landings. The landing gear of the F-16 is not designed to handle the resulting loads and would be liable to collapse, it's simply not strong enough. You can see this easily by comparing the landing gear of an ...


2

During wartime or any emergency; if the F-16 found itself over an ocean and needed to land, and there was a friendly carrier nearby. Could it be done? I'd say yes, using the barricade, one time in extremis. The pilot would have to fly a really flat pass to not knock off the landing gear, but a really good pilot highly motivated to not die flying a good ...


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