33

Yes, blow right through it. You should never deviate from a clearance to "take a beating" later simply because you think you know better than the controller. If the controller is busy it is for a reason, and it is very possible they are extending you on purpose for spacing. You could very well conflict with traffic even more by taking your own turn. It ...


26

It's better to be low(-ish) and ready for a spot to open, than high and far from that spot. As to why, for busy international airports the answer is really simple: ► There isn't a way to manage it near perfectly (yet). To understand that statement, requires some prerequisites, so I'll try to simplify and summarize the basics: There is the concertina ...


26

They can. The Airbus A318 and Embraer E190 both do this in steep approach mode. You can see spoilers extended in this video of a A318 landing and a similar approach in an E190 at London City Airport. Going back further, the Lockheed L-1011 did this with a system called Direct Lift Control. When landing flaps were selected, spoilers raised a set amount. ...


23

did Kai Tak have a straight-in approach to runway 13 for use by steep-approach-certified aircraft? During the 1990s I regularly flew the Hong Kong IGS approach in 747s. At that time, to the best of my knowledge, there was no straight-in approach to runway 13. only the best of the best pilots were allowed to shoot the bent approach to runway 13, and only ...


23

There is no penalty per se, but visual approaches in particular have lower separation requirements, so having to switch you back to a non-visual approach may require ATC to make corrections (e.g. delay vectors, speed control or, in extreme cases, a missed approach), which may feel like a penalty.


16

The main issue is the need to manage the vertical sink rate of your 100000+ lb aluminum trash can and the risks of hard landings. Although they are often called speed brakes, the main effect of flight spoilers is to increase sink rate (without speeding up). On a landing approach at typical jet speeds of around 130kt you don't want to be descending any more ...


15

Airports can accept landing aircraft at a (mostly) fixed, constant rate. However, inbound aircraft arrive at different times and rates based on weather and other factors, regardless of the schedules. This means, at times, aircraft will be coming in faster than the airport can accept them, from many different directions. And airplanes can't just stop mid-air ...


12

A difference of 1 hPa results in an error of 27ft in the altimeter. To have the altimeter showing 3000ft when the aircraft is actually at sea level, the altimeter must be off by 111hPa. Standard air-pressure at sea level is 1013 hPa (that's converted to 29.92 inHg for you Americans). For comparison, the pressure in Hurricane Katrina reached as low as 902 ...


12

It's no problem, just tell Approach you have the airport in sight & request the visual. They'll give it to you almost always. A visual approach is generally a little less restrictive for the controller than an instrument approach is.


9

GPS/WAAS will replace all but ILS in the end. Even now, with graphic displays, smart-lookup from databases, and a line to follow presented to the pilot, VOR use is rapidly falling by the wayside, and point to point navigation will become the norm (and that was occurring in 1996 even, I recall getting cleared direct to a waypoint that was off my paper chart ...


8

As an aside to the hold explanations furnished above: to save on fuel, an airliner will reduce power to commence descent at a distance from the airport which will place it at either 1) its anticipated hold altitude, or 2) the landing pattern entry altitude, subject to ATC's instructions, upon arrival in the vicinity of the airport. While at reduced power, ...


8

Adding to @J.Hougaard's practical reasons, there is one technical reason in the existing standards I can think of: The identification signal (morse code) is provided by the localizer, not the G/S, so G/S-only approaches would be unidentifiable. (ICAO Annex 10 Vol 1 § 3.1.3.9) Side note: I'm not sure if there can be a workaround for it using existing ...


7

For the same reason the basic answer is no to the question "Can two opposite localizers to a single runway be on simultaneously?" The installation will be more expensive than the additional antennas due to the extra validation required to ensure that there is no signal interference. Not to mention a curved path approach typically means there is high terrain ...


7

See here, pages 5-23, 5-24. Things have advanced well beyond ILS for that kind of approach. https://whispertrack.com/pdf/faa_handbook.pdf REQUIRED NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE The operational advantages of RNP include accuracy and integrity monitoring, which provide more precision and lower minimums than conventional RNAV. RNP DAs can be as low as 250 ...


7

Because there would be no benefit to doing so. where the pilot uses the glideslope for vertical guidance but relies on ground- or satellite-based navigation fixes for lateral guidance. As you correctly point out, if using only a glideslope, the pilot would have to rely on other navigation facilities for the horizontal guidance, for example a locator/NDB ...


6

The corkscrew approach as Wikipedia describes it is what the military refers to as a “Force Protection” measure to be used when operating in a high threat environment. It is not a published procedure in the traditional sense of the word, but something that is put in place by the theater commander and briefed to aircrews when driven by the current ...


6

It's an oddball situation because normally once you are put on a heading that will intercept final, the approach clearance is included with the heading instruction ("XXX, turn right heading YYY, cleared for the approach"). But lets say the controller actually just gave you a heading to final and nothing else, and you never heard from them again. The ...


6

Just came back from a backpacking trip into Lake Placid KLKP, glide slope 7.92, and the relics of the olympic ski jumps looming a 1/2 mile to the S of the runway which are to be avoided on the missed approach....which we were.


5

It is very important to know how much altitude you lose per 360 degree turn. You essentially set up your turn at a given bank angle, say 45 degrees and a safe speed to avoid an accelerated stall. You execute the turn at a lower power setting than a normal steep turn, resulting in a "corkscrew" descent path through the air. If your AGL matches your ...


5

Spoilers are called spoilers, because they work by spoiling lift. To slow the aircraft, or make it descend faster, it needs to dissipate the energy and that means increase drag. Disrupting the airflow over the wing creates a lot of drag due to stagnation behind the spoilers, and additional induced drag as the lift distribution is pushed further from optimal....


5

If the approach doesn't contain a published course reversal (ie PT barb or Hold-In-Lieu), the approach must be flown straight in. In this case, you will either get vectors-to-final or you will get cleared via one of the feeder routes.


4

The answer is yes, you CAN use spoilers (in a flight position!) to steepen an approach. The aircraft remains fully controllable and can be flared prior to touchdown with the spoilers in this position. While it is safe, legal, and reasonable to do this, it’s considered a faux pas among professional airline and corporate pilots as high performance flying ...


4

The video's description reads: After passing Eden Rock (min 02:39) it is prohibited to conduct a Go Around. Below is at 2:39: The official eAIP reads (link may die): AD 2 TFFJ.AD 2.22 Flight procedures 22.2 Arrival flights: RWY 28: Going around is prohibited in short final. If Eden Rock is that tiny island on the left, then it makes ...


4

You haven't told us what country you are referring to. I am going to talk about the United States regulations. There are two separate regulations that come into play. Part 91 and Part 121 or 135. Under Part 91. The pilots are allowed to commence any approach (irrespective of weather) and determine if they can continue to land based on the criteria ...


4

FYI, what you're trying to do is called "georeferencing." The scale for each plate is whatever is required to fit in all the relevant information without wasting space. Therefore, to properly geo-reference each plate, you will need to identify at least two points (e.g. CUTIS and CFVGK in this case), look up their lat/long in the published tables, and ...


3

There are no "off-airport helipads" because a helipad is an airport. Actually, anywhere an aircraft lands is an airport as far as the FAA is concerned. It would be just like any other IFR to any other airport with no approach procedure: ATC can clear them for the visual approach if they have reasonable assurance that the weather at the airport is VFR, or the ...


3

This depends on the aircraft. Airbus aircraft have a managed speed mode in the FCU (flight control unit), where the speed is completely controlled by the FMGS (flight management and guidance system). This includes slowing the aircraft down when the appropriate flaps are selected by the crew. No manual action is necessary to reduce airspeed for landing until ...


3

Pressure rise at the static ports, caused by crosswinds or sideslip, is compensated by having a second static port on the opposite side of the aircraft. The traditional static system simply connects both in a T junction, modern types use two separate static pressure sensors and combine the data in the ADC to avoid leaky plumbing. This design also adds ...


3

It's not an IAF according to the FAA approach plate: Besides not being identified as an IAF, JAC could only be an IAF if there was a charted course reversal. As the FAA approach plate specifically says "Procedure Turn NA" that possibility is ruled out.


3

You fly final approach at the "reference speed" (Vref) for the flap setting which varies with weight. You will normally set up the reference speed for full flap on the speed bug on the speed tape on the primary flight displays, and on final while the autopilot flies the glide slope you will modulate thrust to hold the approach speed (or let the autothrottle ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible