52

Anhedral wings will induce roll instability and improve roll maneuverability. In a large/heavy airplane with a high-wing configuration there is usually excess roll stability, so this type of wings can be pretty common. Both the high wing configuration and wing sweep contribute a negative sideslip-induced rolling moment, and anhedral is necessary to limit ...


41

Winglets are less effective at producing added lift than an equal-length wingspan extension. They are used on airliners when simply enlarging the wing would put the plane into a larger size class, or outside the 80 m "box". A longer wingspan, which the An-225 has (10% over the limit), is better at producing lift. The An-225 is a special purpose cargo ...


37

According to the Airliners.net forum, they are fairings that cover hardpoints used for attaching outsize loads. Outsize loads that cannot fit into the capacious cabin (including Buran and Energiya components) are carried 'piggyback', the load supported on two main attachments above the center section. These supports and other smaller ones along the ...


36

Yes, this is common in heavy cargo haulers. As you probably are aware, a dihedral wing configuration provides roll stability. Roll the plane, and it will naturally roll back to level. A center of mass well below the center of lift provides the same effect. Put a lot of weight down below the center of lift, and you'll get the roll-back effect again. While ...


31

No. It doesn't have an APU — it has two of them. They are located close to the main landing gears. From An-225 Mriya is the world’s largest aircraft (English version): Auxiliary power plant consisting of two TA-12 turbofans installed in the left and right chassis fairings provides independent power to all systems and starts the engines. I think "...


30

They are indeed "Soviet style air conditioning". You will see them in other Eastern-bloc aircraft too. We even had them in the Shorts Skyvan. They are operated by a simple on-off switch and can be swiveled to point in the direction chosen by the pilots. The fan blades are made of rubber so they won't cause injury if one's hand inadvertently comes ...


29

Quite simple ― use a (special) towbar! Aircraft with such unique front wheels (like the Antonov An-225 Mriya and Lockheed C-5 Galaxy) carry their own towbar around, which is then attached to the tugs for movement. For example, here is the Galaxy's towbar: From left to right: 68th Airlift Squadon loadmasters, Senior Airman Katy Mackey, Master Sgt. Kevin ...


21

The anhedral is rather exaggerated in the top photo. If you look for pictures of the Mriya in flight the wings are more-or-less level. On the ground, fully fueled, the wings with 3 engines each are heavy and will bend down a very noticeable amount. The B-52 has a similar issue, to the point where it has outrigger wheels near the end of the wings to keep ...


20

It appears to be the extension of the aerodynamic fairing between the vertical and horizontal tails (note that the horizontal tail extends outside the vertical one). It can be seen more clearly in the following image. Image from diecastaircraftforum.com. Original image appears to be from airliners.net This type of fairings (usually called bullet fairings) ...


18

A quick search points to the following being part of the crew Pilot Co-pilot 2x Flight engineers: one on the engine controls; I am not sure of the purpose of the second one but a good guess is hydraulic and electric system monitoring, based on his proximity to the circuit breaker panel (source, scroll down for a 3D photograph of the flight deck). Navigator: ...


18

It is a half hour operation at the best. That's why these aircraft are usually parked away from other aircraft as they take longer to get moving. The aircraft will usually carry its own towbar. Unlike scheduled flights where it makes sense to have your towbars positioned at the airports you operate to, for the type of flying the AN-225 does (unscheduled) it ...


16

As you can see in the second photo, the VM-T was unable to lift a fully-assembled Buran. The VM-T max payload is 50 tonnes, a Buran weighs on the order of 80 tonnes. So for the VM-T flights they had to strip the Buran to get the weight down, including removing the tailplane. The An-225 could lift a fully-assembled Buran, but was not ready in time, so ...


15

The reason An 225 has only two nose landing gears (for a total of four wheels) is that it was developed from An 124 Ruslan, which had pretty much the same arrangement. This works during normal operations as the MLG take up most of the load. However, for loading/unloading, the wheels are not loaded- the nose landing gear is folded, while a support strut ...


10

As a privately-operated aircraft, this is probably not going to be a question which is completely answerable. All that is available is best guesses and incomplete information! That said, the An-225's last tracked flight on FlightAware – as of today – was March 15, 2012 between Bangor, Maine (KBGR) and Port Harcourt, Nigeria (DNPO). That suggests that the An-...


7

"Radiation" is a broad term and does not always imply radio active isotope material. High power radar units can have adverse effects on the human body. The power that radar systems emit varies from a few milliwatts (police traffic control radar) to many kilowatts (large space tracking radars). However, a number of factors significantly reduce human ...


6

As of the time of writing this answer, this only appears to have happened in one out of the last 6 flights of the AN-225 (the same flight into Warsaw you mentioned, https://www.flightradar24.com/data/aircraft/ur-82060#245b19c0) so I can't say that this is an official "rule", a standard of any kind or any procedure regarding the AN-225. There are 2 other ...


6

I'm fairly sure (but have no sources to confirm) that the reasons are purely structural. The vertical stabilisers are simply set at a right angle to the horizontal one. This is just the easiest thing to do, and it also provides better clearance with deflected lower rudders. The aerodynamic consequences of this (for such small angles) are pretty minor. Now ...


6

Both the high wing location and sweepback increase roll stability. Too much roll stability not only reduces maneuverability but is likely to lead to Dutch roll, so anhedral is added to compensate. Airplanes with high but unswept wings generally have neither anhedral nor dihedral. Edit: Here's a discussion of stability, dihedral and Dutch roll, albeit in ...


6

There have been various proposals to use Western engines on new versions of the An-124: An-124-200: Proposed version with General Electric CF6-80C2 engines, each rated at 59,200 lbf (263 kN) An-124-210: Joint proposal with Air Foyle to meet UK's Short Term Strategic Airlifter (STSA) requirement, with Rolls-Royce RB211-524H-T engines, each rated 60,600 lbf (...


4

It's a matter of procedure. Chocking a center wheel provides the greatest defence in the unlikely case the chock is jumped. Other wheels in the truck must also contend. If an outside wheel is chocked and that chock is jumped away, all is lost. No matter tipping or rocking the aircraft in extraordinary winds or loading, the center of a wheel truck is the ...


4

The reason for the wing anhedral has been answered here long ago. Tail anhedral or dihedral can have several reasons: To avoid ground contact during rotation (when the aircraft pitches up in order to lift off the ground). This is needed with a swept tail, so tail dihedral can be found on many airliners. Clearly, the An-225 tail has ample distance to the ...


3

They ARE fans, and they're just for pilot comfort.


3

With straight wings the root extension method is very common. Airplanes that come to mind are Me-109 H (high altitude version with increased span) Beech Twin Bonanza and Model 65 Queen Air (used the Bonanza wing from the engines out) SB-10 (uses SB-9 wings stuck to a new carbon-epoxy center wing). This is impractical with swept wings because of the strong ...


3

It is not unusual for a dedicated cargo plane design to have a high mounted wing design. It allows for the fuselage of the plane to sit lower on the tarmac while maintaining the ground clearance for the engines and wingtips. It also makes it easier to allow the cargo door to be opened in flight without compromising the structural integrity because the main ...


3

There is an additional, possibly bigger reason than blanking of the tail by the shuttle. It's the same reason finlets and ventral fins are added to seaplanes. The side area of the shuttle ahead of the vertical aerodynamic center of the mothership is significant, and has the effect of reducing the weathervaning ability of the 747's vertical tail (imagine ...


3

The AN-225 was designed primarily for carrying the Buran, so they didn't have to make structural changes to an existing design to accomodate the carrying of the shuttle. The aircraft was purpose built for that mission (although it never really saw much of that in practice). The NASA 747 on the other hand, is a stock 747 that they added the ability to carry ...


2

When an aircraft lands, the nose wheel remains elevated, and the main wheels touch down first. This results in a considerable impact on the runway as all of the weight of the aircraft hits the ground. In order to minimise the impact, and prevent damage to the runway, larger aircraft tend to have multiple bogeys on the main wheels to distribute the weight ...


2

The 225 is derived from the An-124, which has 10 integral fuel tanks in the wings. Comparing the specs, it looks like fuel capacity is the same as the An-124, so the center section of the wing (the only new part of the wing) doesn't contain fuel. Based on that, I think the tanks are in sections 2-6 and 13-17. I'm assuming the outer wing sections 1 and 18 are ...


1

The best answer? Most likely, they are getting in practice approaches and pattern work while saving their tire life (gets pricey having to replace 36 tires for some touch and go practice).


1

I'd guess that they wanted to avoid an acute angle between the lower part of the vertical stabiliser and the horizontal - not for structural reasons but to limit interference drag. They could have made the top piece vertical and just kicked out the bottom part, but then the rudder would have to have been made in two parts (or the hinge wouldn't have worked!)...


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