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5

The 787 was not designed to perform such a maneuver. Any jet airliner could do this. What you need for such a steep climb is a good thrust to weight ratio (or enough excess speed to bleed off during the maneuver). A passenger twin-jet is designed such that it can still climb with at least 2.4% climb gradient after a single engine failure during a takeoff at ...


4

The 787 (and other commercial aircraft) are built to carry large loads, whether lots of cargo, or lots of passengers and bags. So, when empty, their performance is much better. If it can do a normal takeoff when full, then it can do a rocket-like takeoff when empty. The near vertical takeoff is, indirectly, a demonstration of how much power it has when ...


4

When you adjust a constant speed propeller to a higher rpm, this will be done by making the propeller blade AoA smaller. Contrary to your question though, manifold pressure and power output will not remain constant unless you adjust the throttle. Neither will your airspeed, not surprisingly. Exact effect will depend on the engine, but basically power is ...


0

There's a one word answer for this, yet the site discourages brief answers. But the answer is yes, your reasoning is correct. I'm not sure what kind of diagram would help clarify that fact.


1

I think your problem is in part, that you assume that $w$ is positive if your aircraft is ascending. The opposite is the case. The aircraft coordinate system is defined as a right-handed system with the z-axis pointing downward. This means a positive $w$ indicates that your aircraft is descending. Therefore, if your plane keeps a constant velocity $u$, the ...


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