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1

The Lancasters regularly cruised above 20,000 ft, near their service ceiling of 21,400 ft at 63,000 lbs. Nine model B.III's were converted to B.VI's by installing two-stage superchargers. This increased their service ceiling to 28,500 ft., but the engines were notoriously prone to failure for various reasons, including RPM "hunting" which would ...


3

No, the true altitude can also be higher than the indicated altitude, if the temperature is higher than expected from the International Standard Atmosphere (ISA). This case is usually not as important as the opposite case because flying at higher true altitude does not create a risk due to terrain clearance. In a standard atmosphere, the indicated altitude ...


6

I can tell you my experience during my stay in Zaragoza Air Base in northeastern Spain, in 1998. After heavy maintenance work, the twin-seater was ready to fly. In order to check all work done, we did a parabolic flight in clean configuration (no loads under wings or fuselage). It was a flight test so we decided to push the limits a little and see the real ...


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