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34

There could be a lot of reasons for this... EU closed airspace to 737's MAX 8's on March 12 They needed to go into a holding pattern until ATC figured out where to put them They needed to be in the holding pattern until they could get a landing slot They were redirected to an airport that had a maintenance facility that the airline uses They redirected to ...


31

I can give you lots of reasons, but as with most things they all really boil down to one: MONEY. Perhaps the first challenge with preserving any classic warbirds in airworthy "flying exhibit" condition is finding one, but let's assume you can locate a mostly-intact Avro Lancaster (in a field somewhere, or as a static display at a museum that hasn't done ...


24

Sounds like a market protectionist move by the nations. i.e. The airlines of UAE and Turkey are relatively new. At least their current expansion to a scale that is competitive with the major international airlines is relatively recent. Their airports have also undergone fairly recent expansions to capitalize on their geographical location as hubs between N. ...


16

You must request a Special Flight Permit from the nearest FSDO (Flight Standards District Office). You'll need to fill out Form 8130-6, Application for U.S. Airworthiness, appropriately calling out the reasons you need a SFP (ferry flight, etc). Once the form is submitted, you may be subject to an inspection by an FAA official or representative, verifying ...


14

This is just because of the way EASA treated B737 MAX grounding. They just stopped accepting flights with these aircraft into the EU airspace even for already airborne flights with valid flight plans. For this company two flights were involved. On from Cape Verde ended up in Tunisia and one from Dubai in Ankara. Both of them were originally hoping to get ...


12

The FAA / Philidelphia FSDO already gave a perfect short and snappy official answer perfectly matching your question. Please note the restrictions mentioned in this handy sheet to stay absolutely legal :) The short summary: contact your local FSDO to request a Special Flight Permit ("ferry permit"), which are commonly used for: Flying the aircraft to a ...


12

Besides the main points you mentioned, I can think of a couple things, the first is sort of related to your point #1. Airplanes are designed to be easy to service. Cars are less so. Cars only have a few very expensive parts, mainly the drivetrain (engine and transmission). If either of those needs to be replaced in an older car, it can easily cost more than ...


9

Assuming there is no STC ("Supplemental Type Certificate") that addresses this as an existing modification, the answer, in terms of acceptable aircraft airworthiness, is a hard no. "Can the aircraft fly" is a tricky question in some ways, but dead-easy in others. And remember: a helicopter is a thousand moving parts spinning wildly around an oil leak. ...


9

As Andy pointed out, this question is very broad (even if we're only talking about India). Your starting point should be the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) because they can tell you definitively what would be involved in getting a "homebuilt" aircraft approved to fly under Indian law. Information about this is available on the DGCA website and ...


9

This FAA legal interpretation covers a lot of scenarios and it looks like it answers yours too. Although it refers to rental, not ownership, the result is the same because rental time isn't instruction or carriage for hire. First, what the regulation says (14 CFR 91.409(b)): Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, no person may operate an ...


7

I own a 182 from 1976 and it looks brand new. It's a common misconception that planes don't oxidize; they do. Aluminum does have it's own form of "rust". Airplanes that are on the coasts usually have a rust preventative applied frequently to prevent oxidizing. When you have a problem with a car you take it to the shop. This problem could have occurred ...


7

Generally, to create lift means to deflect the oncoming airstream downwards. How and where this is done in detail on an airplane is less important than doing it with a smooth spanwise lift distribution such that the wake behind the aircraft is trough-shaped. A fuselage is disturbing this lift distribution, but not severely. The length of the fuselage means ...


7

Another point that decreases the life of items constructed in wartime, is that raw materials are in particularly short supply and that one must make-do with what is on hand. Consider that the British were offering up their metal garden railings for scrap to make armaments, bones for explosives, rubber and paper too. This is one of the reasons the De ...


7

Compliance with Airworthiness Directives (ADs) involves an appropriate logbook entry. Examine the aircraft logbooks, or have someone competent in the subject matter—an aircraft mechanic, for example—to determine if applicable ADs have been complied with. Each AD requires different compliance measures, ranging from a one-time inspection or parts replacement ...


6

The annual will reset the 100 hours. See 91.409 (b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, no person may operate an aircraft carrying any person (other than a crewmember) for hire, and no person may give flight instruction for hire in an aircraft which that person provides, unless within the preceding 100 hours of time in service the ...


6

I don't believe there's been a stated reason, but we can surmise several Newer aircraft have newer, more efficient engines meaning typically lower noise and less pollution. Newer aircraft are typically better maintained. Obviously this isn't always true, and some older aircraft can be very well maintained, but it's easier to just put a blanket cut-off ...


6

Part 91 does not require an EGT probe for any operations so the next thing to look at is your AFM. Your C172S has an AFM that includes a Comprehensive Equipment List. It is probably similar to this one that indicates that the EGT probe is standard equipment—not required for certification, this airplane can fly with it placarded.


5

I only can speak for Canada but we use much of the American regulations in Canada as part of our regulations. In Canada, all mission critical systems Ie flight control systems etc ... have to be signed off by 2 inspectors for a total of 3 people working on the system. The maintenance engineer will sign of there own work and the inspector will sign off the ...


5

Most relevant faactors have been covered, but a summary may help newcomers. While the service life may have been short (I recollect a figure of 42 hrs as the average service life of a Lancaster) this did not mean they were thrown together. They were built to the best standards of the day, often better than today's GA aircraft, -BUT- The long-term behaviour ...


5

The answers so far give many valid reasons, but two more are missing: In GA aircraft, progress has stopped in airframe design somewhere in the Sixties. Only the home build community has really improved the designs, and the avionics have tremendously improved, but commercial GA aircraft have still the same structure and engines. Since the number of active ...


5

This FAA AC outlines how SB's should be drafted. It also says that the Design Approval Holder should make available an easy way to search the SB's A DAH should develop a robust SB/AD tracking and management system using the following process to ensure overlaps and conflicts between new and existing SB actions are identified and addressed: a. Search ...


5

This has happened. The aircraft was landed (as soon as possible) for a good reason. Both of these cases address partial failure. Complete loss of stab I have no knowledge of. The RH failure happened once that I know of at low speed (stab full down) on an SH-60B (1980's). It created a right stick / cross control situation (left roll) that the pilots ...


5

It can’t void the time, but if an Inspector ever caught a CFI doing something like that, he’s in big trouble. And more importantly, that CFI should know better than to do something like that in front of a student.


4

There's a good article on this question for the US here (you mentioned Texas). The relevant FAR is 14 CFR 43.12: §43.12 Maintenance records: Falsification, reproduction, or alteration a) No person may make or cause to be made: (1) Any fraudulent or intentionally false entry in any record or report that is required to be made, kept, or used ...


4

In your question you started out asking about airworthiness directives (ADs) and then switched to service bulletins (SBs). They are two different things with different implications depending on which rules you are flying under. For general aviation aircraft that are flown under Part 91 of the FARs you must comply with ADs in order for your aircraft to be ...


4

I can only speak for commercial aviation, but in my experience, we generally have 100% RII buyback on initial AD compliance issues. For example, if we have to run a new wire bundle or reroute a wire bundle as part of an AD, it has to be "bought off" by either a QC inspector or an RII-qualified mechanic. In these situations, I would say that the work is done ...


4

This is just my personal opinion, but I think bomber aircraft have more ethical issues associated with them than fighter aircraft, and so are probably less popular. Spitfires are strongly associated with defensive actions like the Battle of Britain, so it's easy to see Spitfires as a good thing. Explaining to a child at an airshow what a Lancaster was ...


4

The Longest Day (1962) and A Bridge Too Far (1977) featuring Spitfires each grossed about \$50m while the only significant film featuring the Lancaster, The Guns of Navarone (1961) only grossed about \$30m. So we can estimate that the general public has had about 3x more exposure to the Spitfire than the Lancaster, perhaps explaining the disparity in ...


4

When dealing with lightning protection, there are two significant areas that must be addressed: direct effects of lightning and indirect effects. The FAA provides guidance on these two areas in the following advisory circulars: 20-155A - Industry Documents To Support Aircraft Lightning Protection Certification 20-136B - Aircraft Electrical and ...


3

I can speak to the FAA requirements. The basic requirement for the annual inspection (commercial aircraft have additional requirements) comes from 14 CFR Part 91.409 §91.409 Inspections. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, no person may operate an aircraft unless, within the preceding 12 calendar months, it has had— ...


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