37

Having an engine shutdown during the flight is an engine failure. An engine failure is one of the procedures where every pilot is trained to deal with because it is easy to simulate. Engine failure is an emergency, meaning that the pilots must land the aircraft as soon as possible. Can't a jet engine be just restarted? Maybe, maybe not. It depends on the ...


21

@Kevin is quite correct but to add to it the airworthiness issuance was issued because of the risk of a dual engine failure ...issued an emergency airworthiness directive (AD) warning of a potential “dual engine” inflight shutdown on A320neo family aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney PW1100G geared turbofan (GTF) engines. @Kevin covers the single ...


20

Aircrews seldom have to power off an aircraft completely (also known as a cold and dark cockpit). Airliners usually stay powered on at the gate. This is known as a "short turn-around": engines are stopped, the APU is stopped, but electrical power and air conditioning is still supplied by ground equipment. This has the advantage of minimizing turn-around ...


15

There have been issues with the 787 giving "nuisance" messages after starting up. One solution would be to start the process earlier, to leave time to deal with them. Another is to just never shut it down. However, the plane does need to be shut down sometimes for regular maintenance. A Boeing spokesperson said: No airplane in the fleet experienced that ...


15

Straight from the FAA: Airworthiness Directives (ADs) are legally enforceable rules issued by the FAA in accordance with 14 CFR part 39 to correct an unsafe condition in a product. 14 CFR part 39 defines a product as an aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, or appliance. When an aircraft or other component is found to have flaws or other issues, the FAA ...


13

Are there currently any ADs for Boing 777s which would indicate the potential for catastrophic electronic system failures that might explain MH370's transponder failure and other issues? No one of the ADs issued for 777s can by itself fully explain all the facts of the final flight of MH370/MAS370. Basic facts The aircraft was a 777-2H6ER with 53460 ...


12

It's there because the law requires it. 49 USC 40113(f): (f)Application of Certain Regulations to Alaska.— In amending title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, in a manner affecting intrastate aviation in Alaska, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall consider the extent to which Alaska is not served by transportation modes other ...


9

It depends on the agreements between the operator/owner of the aircraft on one side and the manufacturer of the aircraft and its suppliers on the other side. Often there will be some form of compensation involved if an AD is issued when that AD is addressing non-compliance with regulations / standard in effect when the aircraft was produced. Normally there ...


8

The cost of complying with an AD falls on the owner/operator of the aircraft. Failing to comply with an AD renders the aircraft unairworthy. It also could incur FAA penalties, but more importantly, it could result in structural damage or failure, and in some cases ultimately cause a fatal accident.


7

This is a bug Boeing found in the 787. This bug, which was found during laboratory testing, is: ... plane’s power control units could shut down power generators if they were powered without interruption for 248 days, or about eight months This bug wasn't found in any airplanes in line operations. Boeing states that: ... power was shut down in all ...


7

Compliance with Airworthiness Directives (ADs) involves an appropriate logbook entry. Examine the aircraft logbooks, or have someone competent in the subject matter—an aircraft mechanic, for example—to determine if applicable ADs have been complied with. Each AD requires different compliance measures, ranging from a one-time inspection or parts replacement ...


7

Not being able to sell seats on the last row would (in Lufthansa's case) theoretically mean a 3.3% loss of revenue: LH setup for A320neo is 180 seats, 6 seats in last row. But, only theoretically, because seat occupancy rate for Lufthansa Group was 81.4% (2018). It is very unlikely that all of the flights operated with A320neo would fly 100% fully booked. ...


6

The answer is basically no for aircraft not under warranty, but... I've participated in numerous AD related activities on the OEM side, and I've never seen an AD with a commercial policy incorporated into it that dictated who pays for compliance, kits, or labor. So strictly speaking, the aircraft operator is on the hook once an aircraft is out of ...


5

I am interpreting your question as asking whether an owner of an aircraft is responsible for complying with ADs that were issued before the aircraft was manufactured. Short answer: yes. There are several types of ADs that affect your aircraft. Some of them apply to all aircraft of a specific type, some apply to specific serial numbers or model numbers, and ...


4

The operator's airworthiness department interprets the AD and informs the operations department and senior management. Ops decide how to deal with airborne aircraft. The EASA AD actually had more generous continued flight provisions than the FAA issued AD. It was in no way intended to prevent aircraft in flight from landing. Airworthiness would ...


4

In your question you started out asking about airworthiness directives (ADs) and then switched to service bulletins (SBs). They are two different things with different implications depending on which rules you are flying under. For general aviation aircraft that are flown under Part 91 of the FARs you must comply with ADs in order for your aircraft to be ...


4

I can only speak for commercial aviation, but in my experience, we generally have 100% RII buyback on initial AD compliance issues. For example, if we have to run a new wire bundle or reroute a wire bundle as part of an AD, it has to be "bought off" by either a QC inspector or an RII-qualified mechanic. In these situations, I would say that the work is done ...


3

New rules don't affect t existing designs.... Certification basis is declared by the maker and agreed with the certifying authority...Or authorities... ( ideally it's a common certification basis to avoid extra testing, or building aircraft to different standards) That basis must reflective rules in existence at the time of application. New or pending ...


3

Each AD is specific (and unique) to the procedures and compliance outlined in the AD. If the AD does not say otherwise, all that is needed is to comply with it (do the inspection), and then make an entry in the maintenance log book, and you will be good to go. I have never seen an AD that addresses circumstances when not previously complied with. For ...


3

ADs aren't 'closed', they are 'complied with'. If the AD has been revised and the new compliance criteria are not met, then you would need to perform whatever measures are required by the revised AD. There are a number of reasons that the AD may have been revised but in the example that you allude to, the proposed action does not appear to be sufficient to ...


3

A modification is a change to the airplane's physical configuration from the standpoint of fit/form/function. Think Service Bulletin with a parts kit. Or an SB that has instructions for a physical rework of a part that makes it different from non-reworked parts, and the part is re-identified. A corrective action is any action required by the AD to mitigate ...


3

The average flight time (AFT) is defined as flight hours (FH) divided by flight cycles (FC) accumulated by an individual airplane since the airplane's first flight, specified in hours and hundredths of an hour.


2

As far as I know there is no legislation that requires a manufacturer to cover the cost of an AD. However its within their interest to do so. Keeping you in your Cessna buying parts when you need them and generally being a free advert on every airfield you land at may be worth more to the company than the cost of fixing an issue the FAA says in pretty ...


2

The threshold is the starting base line of the repeat inspection requirement, in this case the calendar date of AD release, and the phase-in is the "grace period" (25 hours) to accommodate airplanes not done yet. The AD implements a hundred hour repeat inspection. That means that there is a maximum dormancy (potential undetected existence of whatever ...


2

It's a threshold and phase-in. The 5000 landings is the threshold and is landings since new, with a 1000 landing phase-in. The phase-in is to accommodate airplanes close to, or over, the threshold; otherwise, everybody over the threshold would be grounded immediately, and someone close to the threshold would have only the hours remaining to the threshold ...


1

You need to comply with the AD prior to accumulating 5,000 landings or within the next 1,000 landings after the effective date of the AD, whichever occurs later. This is a very simple order compared to a few others.


1

Break down the timeline logic. The key word is "later". AD released today. Last inspection may or may not have been done 50 hours ago, which pre-AD was voluntary or part of a non-mandatory maintenance program, or part of some recommended Service Bulletin, that is now being mandated, or maybe it was never done at all. Assume it was done 50 hours ago. ...


1

Actually the answer is quite complex, but essentially depends on the local aerodynamics, shape of the probe and the anti-icing power (heating). Imagine an airplane flying around a cloud, it essentially approaches air with small drops of water floating around, those drops of water impact the pitot tube and some of them keep over the pitot tube surface. Now, ...


1

An Airworthiness Directive is a legal notice, issued by either the manufacturer and/or the FAA, alerting an owner to an issue with the aircraft or system which presents a hazard to flight safety as well as instructions on how to remedy this problem. It's similar to a recall notice on an automobile with the added mandate by the government that the aircraft ...


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