Hot answers tagged

13

Short answer: only part of the airway is unusable, and even then it's usable with GPS. Your image shows V522 between FAILS intersection and the ERI VOR but you have to look at the full airway, which runs from the DJB VOR in the south-west to MYPAL intersection in the north-east: As you can see, only some parts of it are marked unusable, even if they're ...


11

You are correct that VOR's rarely have a range of more than 200 NM. However, Alta Floresta VOR (ATF) is colocated with an NDB (and DME). In spite of less accuracy, NDB's have a much greater range (partly because their signals can travel as ground waves). This makes it possible to have a very long segment on the G678 airway without other navigation aids. When ...


10

Yes, from your example J34-68-538 are jet routes that share a segment and aircraft on different routes may travel the same segments between waypoints. A complete explanation is in the FAA's Aeronautical Chart User Guide.


8

Most air routes in Europe are unchanged since the days before GPS, when they were defined by radials from VOR and NDB radio beacons. As these have a limited range, they could easily be used to define routes across the Adriatic, but less so down its several-hundred-mile length. Routes would therefore normally be defined over land where the plane can route ...


6

There is a notation for V15 (low altitude IFR airway) in the southern portion of the top map in your question. V15 is a Federal Airway, normally used for IFR operations and shown on IFR charts as well as VFR Sectionals. Federal Airways, unless otherwise notated, begin at 1200 AGL. These airways are Class E airspace. If you look in the legend of your ...


6

If you are flying IFR the FAA expects you to be on the centerline of the airway, as per the FAA's IFR flying manual to operate an aircraft within controlled airspace under IFR, pilots must either fly along the centerline when on a Federal airway or... I can't find any references in the Airplane Flying Handbook to airways at all and keep in mind under ...


6

ATS routes in Europe are designated just like the rest of the world. ICAO publishes guidelines for the designation of ATS routes in Annex 11, which are adopted by almost all countries. A route will consist of a possible prefix (see below) a letter (see below) and a basic designator (a number between 1-999). The three types of prefix are: K (Kopter) to ...


5

Yes. In fact, before GPS came along, if you were flying somewhere and wanted to use your VOR to get from A to B, that's exactly what you did a lot of the time if it was convenient; fly along the victor airways if they were more or less on your route. IFR traffic is only separated from other IFR traffic and when VFR in non positive control airspace you can ...


5

RNAV freed aircraft from the airways that were already in place that may have zig zagged from VOR to VOR, but with the limitations of the ATC system based on human controllers, it is still desirable to keep most aircraft on a "road network" so to speak to make it easy to manage separation, so RNAV airways were created between major centers that provide ...


5

At least in the US airspace definition, High Altitude Airways (Jet Routes) have no defined width regardless of the airway being navaid-based or RNAV/RNP This is briefly stated in the FAA training manuals: http://tfmlearning.faa.gov/Publications/atpubs/AIR/air2004.html


4

In the US, the National Flight Data Center (NFDC) publishes a database of preferred routes. You can query it or download the entire database. Here is the result of entering only BWI to PHX: A practical resource for planning a real flight is to review the routes of previous flights. I browse the origin and destinations, or nearby airports to my flight and ...


4

Airways is a term that is used for the sort of "highways in the sky" that a lot of commercial air traffic use. However, as you are reasonably close to an airport what you're most likely referring to is SIDS (Standard instrument departures) or STARS (Standard terminal arrivals). Both of these can be found quite easily by searching for the airport name/...


4

Your map shows the Czech Republic. By checking the Czech AIP GEN 1.7, we see that they don't list any differences from the standards of the ATS route designators listed in ICAO SARPs Annex 11 Appendix 1. By contrast, in the UK AIP, it says (emphasis mine): The majority of ATS route designators have been changed to comply with Appendix 1 requirements. In ...


3

Commercial airliners generally fly IFR as such they do what ATC tells them to do. They are not free to chose their own path. The airway system in the USA and elsewhere on the globe stems from the pre-GPS era when VOR's and other ground based nav aids were the predominant method of navigation. Airways tend to be either between VOR's or between points you can ...


2

Enroute: An aircraft that is on its way to its destination. Air Route: A specific route that an aircraft takes, just like a car route, taking specific highways and roads to get to your destination. Planes do not go a straight line from their origin to destination. Airway: A highway in the sky. That is what planes fly in their route. So for example 2 planes ...


2

So there's a lot going on in your question to address. First, and most importantly, the info you linked is for ATC, not pilots. you won't get any usable info of how to fly IFR in this airspace. You won't need to know any of this to fly IFR. You won't need any of this to fly VFR either, for what it's worth. When you fly IFR you file a flight plan that ...


2

The 500 and 1,000 feet separations you mention, for IFR–VFR and VFR–VFR, respectively, are adequate. For USA, 14 CFR § 91.181 - Course to be flown is clear, and is echoed in the AIM. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, no person may operate an aircraft within controlled airspace under IFR except as follows: (a) On an ATS route, along the centerline ...


2

Your best bet is flying across the Atlantic, where the Strategic Lateral Offset Procedure (SLOP) is used. This is where the pilot flies a offset to the route, either 1 or 2 NM, always to the right, chosen randomly (or based on surrounding traffic/TCAS), and is kept from the ATC (no radar coverage, although that is changing with satellite ADS-B). As shown ...


1

Likely at the floor of the Class E airspace. A Federal Airway coinciding with a Class E floor higher than 1200' AGL would normally only exist in mountainous terrain. A definitive example could be found by looking in the FAA's "Airspace Designations And Reporting Points" document, available on-line.


1

When filing a VFR flight plan with an ATS route identifier in it, consider the following: - check that the aircraft is equipped with suitable navigation aid receivers (e.g., ADF, VOR, GPS) - check the lowest altitude permitted for that specific ATS route - make sure the weather / clouds will allow you to climb and maintain the minimum ATS route altitude in ...


1

For low altitude flights ie below FL180, yes you can. You can use either Victor (VOR) or Tango (RNAV) airways. You will fly at VFR altitudes during cruise, but use of these airways on VFR flights is common. For improved safety and traffic separation, pilots are requested to either file and open a VFR flight plan or request flight following when VFR on ...


1

Skyvector uses official charts from the US National Aeronautical Chart Office (NACO) where available. For the rest of the world, it synthesizes maps using the NACO style based on data from each country's Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP). This will not match what local charts look like and is not valid for navigation. Within the US, you can select ...


1

A partial answer to my own question... The jet-streams over the Atlantic mean that traffic flying west from northern Europe to north America will seek a path further to the north than traffic coming in the opposite direction. So there at least, there is more likely to be passing traffic on your left than on your right. That's an arrangement imposed by ...


1

You are partially correct, first of all they are called "RNAV routes" not "RNAV airways" and yes the entire point of RNAV was not needing to fly along a suboptimal preset path but that was because of the fact that you flight plan had you flying directly over the navigational beacons. Like this: RNAV routes allow more efficient flight by connecting random ...


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