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4

There are a handful of towers still in Class E/G airspace. They're rare, but they do exist and are something to watch out for during preflight planning. As of April 2021, here's the airports I know of: KJYO - Leesburg, VA KPCA - Picacho ARNG, AZ KTNX - Tonopah Test Range, NV (inside restricted airspace) I wouldn't be surprised if there's others I missed, ...


2

Yes, there is a tower in G (with E above), you just can't fly there Surface-level controlled (alphabet) airspace isn't allowed to overlap special-use (R-area) airspace, as can be noted from the situation at Creech AFB. This means that the tower (Silverbow Tower) at Tonopah Test Range (KTNX) isn't in controlled airspace as the airport is within the bounds of ...


6

It looks like a mistake of some kind. The next release of the Chart Supplement is valid from 2021-04-22 and the airspace line has been removed completely from the KJYO entry.


1

There is nothing specific to operating a military jet or any other type of aircraft. If you are in class E or G airspace, you can fly VFR and do whatever maneuvers you want without even talking to ATC, though you are still required to see and avoid other traffic. This is generally how student pilots practice their maneuvers, though much lower and slower ...


1

If you visit the Aeronautical Information Manual, section 3-5-6, it will provide the answer for you: "TRSAs were originally established as part of the Terminal Radar Program at selected airports. TRSAs were never controlled airspace from a regulatory standpoint because the establishment of TRSAs was never subject to the rulemaking process; consequently, ...


3

At areas where a local increase in traffic density occurs, a temporary tower may be installed. This may be at an uncontrolled airport which may be in class E, or even Class G airspace. By definition, whereas class G is uncontrolled airspace, adding a control tower does require a Notice to Airmen alerting to the change in airspace and the requirement of the ...


-1

The simple answer is that you don't get your own block of airspace to do aerobatics in your private turbojet. You could fly into a military operations area, but even if authorized to use that airspace (and some private owners are) for that purpose, anyone flying VFR may transit that airspace without talking to a soul...which means you don't own it. You just ...


5

As @jamessqf points out, once the aircraft is no longer owned by the government1 there wouldn't be any regulatory difference between you requesting air work and, say, a Gulfstream acceptance or post-maintenance flight that needs to fly around at odd altitudes and attitudes to check out various systems. That said... Below FL180 you can fly VFR as you like. Of ...


1

The easiest way that I was told to relate to a TRSA is to think of it as a baby Class C airspace. The TRSA is technically Class D or E airspace with almost all of the equivalent facilities and equipment of a Class C. You can receive almost all of the same ATC service of a Class C in a TRSA. But, it is not mandatory to use them. Another way to view a TRSA is ...


7

I think - and I may be wrong - that your question assumes that ATC services are the same in a TRSA and in class E in general. Or perhaps that TRSA Service and flight following give you exactly the same thing. In fact, TRSA service is slightly different: it provides everything that Basic Radar Service does (e.g. safety alerts, sequencing), plus separation ...


0

The outer area surrounding classy airspace is not actually Class C airspace, but a procedural area associated with the Class C and not charted. See Note 4 of AIM 3-2-4. This area is not considered Class C airspace, but VFR flights making use of approach control or IFR flights inbound and outbound of the Class C are still under the control of approach ...


8

Trust, but verify. The pilot must comply with 91.129 and 91.130 unless otherwise instructed by ATC. ATC of any kind (radar or tower, Class C or Class D) should coordinate with any affected tower if an aircraft they are providing services to will enter another facility's surface area airspace. At least that's how I read the 7110.65 2–1–16, which you will note ...


0

In the United States, air rights, especially with sUAS operation still remain vague and case law concerning them is not fully decided. The most succinct ruling that I know of in the subject is United States v Causby, 328 U.S. 256 (1946). Here the Supreme Court struck down the Heaven and Hell Doctrine, stating that navigable airspace over the United States ...


3

No. At common law (i.e., the law that existed before the existence of law statutes), there was a doctrine known as ad coelum, literally "to the skies"; it meant that anyone who owned the land controlled it from the skies to the depths. But in the United States, Congress did away with this doctrine in the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938. In this ...


4

December 1979. Air Force F4C, call sign taste 27 got permission from Albuquerque center to fly into the canyon. Was told we were making history, that we were the last jet to be allowed into the canyon.


5

The example KFCM to KRNH starts under the Class B shelf, in this case you check KFCM's chart supplement, and it says, "MINNEAPOLIS APP/DEP CON 134.7": Which also agrees with the sectional (shown below). Zoom out in the sectional, and you'll note different frequencies to the NW and NE of the Class B, so if you're transitioning through, the ...


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