11

The way SkyVector shows airspace is subtly different than shown on FAA charts. Whereas the FAA shows the combined limits in each area, SkyVector shows the limits once for each layer, even where layers overlap. So, what you are probably seeing here is one area of FL145/35 on top of another area of 35/SFC, possibly disjoint but the labels for both areas just ...


8

Your question is flawed because you have labeled the airspace incorrectly: The thin circular magenta line you have labeled class C is actually the edge of the 30 mile mode C veil around SEA. The shaded magenta line you have labeled class D actually depicts the area where the class E floor is 700’ AGL. If you want to see how class C airspace is normally ...


8

Trust, but verify. The pilot must comply with 91.129 and 91.130 unless otherwise instructed by ATC. ATC of any kind (radar or tower, Class C or Class D) should coordinate with any affected tower if an aircraft they are providing services to will enter another facility's surface area airspace. At least that's how I read the 7110.65 2–1–16, which you will note ...


7

I think - and I may be wrong - that your question assumes that ATC services are the same in a TRSA and in class E in general. Or perhaps that TRSA Service and flight following give you exactly the same thing. In fact, TRSA service is slightly different: it provides everything that Basic Radar Service does (e.g. safety alerts, sequencing), plus separation ...


6

I will second @StephenS's image as the best you're likely to find with minimal effort. In fact there are a few of these images available if you do an image search for "FAA STARS TAMR" and I've included all of them at the bottom of this answer. Real answer If you need the specific boundaries you can submit a FOIA request. If you're a private citizen ...


6

It looks like a mistake of some kind. The next release of the Chart Supplement is valid from 2021-04-22 and the airspace line has been removed completely from the KJYO entry.


5

The example KFCM to KRNH starts under the Class B shelf, in this case you check KFCM's chart supplement, and it says, "MINNEAPOLIS APP/DEP CON 134.7": Which also agrees with the sectional (shown below). Zoom out in the sectional, and you'll note different frequencies to the NW and NE of the Class B, so if you're transitioning through, the ...


5

Per 14 CFR Part 103, an ultralight can not be registered as an aircraft under Part 91. But, there is no regulation limiting the weight of an aircraft being operated under Part 91. To do so, an aircraft just must be registered under Part 91 as an aircraft. But, an aircraft can only meet either Part 103 or Part 91. It can not meet both simultaneously. In other ...


5

If the aircraft is not registered, it can only be operated under part 103. FAR 103.1 states that an ultralight may not "have any U.S. or foreign airworthiness certificate". So a registered aircraft could not be operated under Part 103. Your question mentioned transponders. Bear in mind that FAR 91.1(e) exempts ultralight vehicles from all of Part ...


5

As @jamessqf points out, once the aircraft is no longer owned by the government1 there wouldn't be any regulatory difference between you requesting air work and, say, a Gulfstream acceptance or post-maintenance flight that needs to fly around at odd altitudes and attitudes to check out various systems. That said... Below FL180 you can fly VFR as you like. Of ...


4

Great question. The short answer to your question is "Full Time." Ultimately that Class D airspace will be incorporated into the LAX Class B, but there is a lot of red tape involved so step one was to add the Class D extensions, then it will be incorpoated into LAX Class B at a later date. Its a big deal, Title 14 CFR Part 71 had to be amended, ...


4

December 1979. Air Force F4C, call sign taste 27 got permission from Albuquerque center to fly into the canyon. Was told we were making history, that we were the last jet to be allowed into the canyon.


4

Originally they were zones to protect Americas nuclear testing areas and other key military interests. The Albuquerque area was likely there to protect Los Alamos Laboratory and other related nuclear assets of the era. This report prepared for congress (on a slightly different topic) has some notes on this in the "History" section. They explain an ...


4

The triangular area you’re referring to is actually the LAX class D airspace. The heliport itself is uncontrolled. It is not that uncommon for an uncontrolled heliport or airport to be within the surface area of a controlled airport. Departing aircraft are required to contact tower as soon as practical after takeoff, and arriving aircraft are told that ...


4

There are a handful of towers still in surface Class E/G airspace. They're rare, but they do exist and are something to watch out for during preflight planning. As of April 2021, here's the airports I know of: KJYO - Leesburg, VA KPCA - Picacho ARNG, AZ KTNX - Tonopah Test Range, NV (inside restricted airspace) I wouldn't be surprised if there's others I ...


4

In the United States, if you are VFR at an airport in Class G or E airspace, you may take off without needing clearance or permission from ATC. Normally Class D airspace reverts to E or G outside of tower operating hours, therefore no communication with tower is required or even possible.


4

The answer is the same in theory: you just tell ATC what you want to do, and they either approve it (possibly with some modifications) or deny it. Since all VFR services are on a “workload permitting” basis, which answer you get may depend on when you ask. The only difference in practice is that class B airspace tends to be a lot busier than class C, which ...


3

Airspace boundaries are not defined by altimeter settings or Indicated Altitude. Like the field elevation, they are at True Altitude. This is defined as the actual height above the 19-year average level of the sea surface. Some boundaries are defined by the height above the surface (field elevation) which is in turn at True Altitude. The MSL vertical ...


3

The closest thing I could find was MVA and MIA Charts from FAA web site. The data format is in AIXM (XML) but I am not sure if this will cover you as I haven't tried reading any of the AIXM files. By looking into the PDF that provides the "cartoon-y" preview, it seems that the data are only that: MVA and MIA. If you need anything more than that, ...


3

No. At common law (i.e., the law that existed before the existence of law statutes), there was a doctrine known as ad coelum, literally "to the skies"; it meant that anyone who owned the land controlled it from the skies to the depths. But in the United States, Congress did away with this doctrine in the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938. In this ...


3

Since I worked the airspace around KRAP, I'll cover that scenario for you. The tower at KRAP closes at 10 PM local, and the airspace at the field reverts to E2. The TRACON at KRCA closes at the same time, so Denver Center (that would've been me) gets the airspace after hours. We treat all Class E airspace near an airport the same, so the closest of your ...


3

Bonus question-- why was the airspace portrayed differently on the VFR sectional charts in the first two examples (ACV and TVL) than in the last three examples (SGU, BIH, and SIT/PASI)? After submitting an inquiry through an on-line portal, I recently spoke to a cartographer with the Aeronautical Information Services, who said in his opinion the depiction ...


3

All airspace is ultimately owned by some Center (US: ARTCC, ICAO: ACC). Some is delegated to Approach facilities (US: TRACON), and Approach can sub-delegate part of their airspace to a Tower. And Center can delegate airspace directly to Towers without an overlying Approach. If any facility closes, it’s associated airspace automatically reverts back to ...


3

Contacting Approach is not required for VFRs unless the D tower’s ATIS says so. For instance, while you won’t find it on the charts, A/FD or NOTAMs, the ATIS at KADS always says “contact Regional Approach on 124.3 and advise you have information [letter]” rather than the usual “advise on initial contact you have information [letter]”. If you try calling ...


3

In addition to TomMcW@'s answer, the FAA also installed ILS systems at both KMYF and KCRQ and implemented Class B airspace around KSAN. The Cessna wasn't just allowed near busy airspace, they were specifically doing ILS training at the airfield executing a missed approach under VFR. Adding ILS systems at GA airports didn't directly change ATC procedures or ...


3

At areas where a local increase in traffic density occurs, a temporary tower may be installed. This may be at an uncontrolled airport which may be in class E, or even Class G airspace. By definition, whereas class G is uncontrolled airspace, adding a control tower does require a Notice to Airmen alerting to the change in airspace and the requirement of the ...


3

Your question is interesting but the answer is not fully obvious without a bit of research. In looking at the KSEA IFR Enroute chart (L01 IFR enroute chart -third image below) it does indeed show that a portion of the the Seattle International Airport is within Class D airspace. The second image below shows an excerpt from FAA Order 7400.11E describing the ...


3

According to ICAO conventions the offical international language of aviation is English therefore it is unlikely that Russian fighter pilots will speak in Russian to a foreign pilot. If the pilot overlfying American waters, it's unlikely that Russian fighters are free to intercept planes in American airspace. If such scenario happens, the pilot can report ...


3

Having special flight rules in Part 93 doesn't mean that the regular flight rules of Part 91 don't still apply. The SFRA is within the faded magenta line on the sectional chart, indicating Class G up to 700 and Class E above that. In fact, it is within the New York E5 airspace as listed on page E-373 of the current JO 7400.11E. AEA NY E5 New York, NY That ...


2

I’ve been looking for years myself, and this is the best facility map I’ve been able to find so far, shared in a private forum by some ATC folks: I know this is exactly the kind of “cartoon-y” outline that you don’t want, and I expect to be downvoted for it, but maybe others will better understand what you are looking for: a map of airspace ownership rather ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible