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4

Prologue: the quote in the question is from Wikipedia, and the parts there that mention the designation to commercial aircraft emergencies have later been marked as "citation needed". Therefore, for as long as an authoritative source can not be verified, it might well be that in reality there is no such designation. Actually, should the nature of the ...


2

The other two 31's (not 31C) are "emergency use only" for large jets. They won't be used for anything but an emergency. While 4R is the usual runway used in that direction, 4L could be used in other-than-emergency cases. That's why it lacks the notation mentioned. How does that matter? Let's say 31C is closed for repairs. Absent a compelling emergency, big ...


1

In the U.S. an airport will have safety teams and internal incident/accident reporting. This is more for airport operations and OSHA standards. It has little to nothing to do with what we typically think of FAA/NTSB incident and accident reporting and investigation. The airport’s team is strictly internal. Although, it may have to report to some external ...


2

As a designer and supplier of these products I would suggest that the fences in question are not a solid face and are either a mesh or slatted louvre type design. This would be for low power, taxiing or breakaway thrust and the design allows the airflow through the fence and the louvre or mesh turns the airflow vertically thus creating and aerodynamic ...


2

More often than not, the accident investigation boards in Europe are a governmental unit independent of NCAA. The Board should be able to criticize and put requirements on all units involved in an accident/incident. This obviously include the CAA. Departements and organizations are free to do an accident investigation. Availability to an accident site may ...


3

Apart from the practical implications, aircraft pressurise their cabins with the bleed air coming from the jet engines. This air is compressed by the engines and used for the combustions process. So there are no seperate air compressors. If you want to have the aircraft compressed at the ground, you will need to either keep the engines running or add ...


2

Besides the fact that this is unlikely to be kind on passengers to overpressurize, the passenger doors and the jetways aren't the only portal into the pressurized space. The luggage going in the belly and the servicing carts coming in the rear would also have to be accommodated. Trying to load and unload cargo through an airlock would slow things down a ...


3

Below around 8000' MSL aircraft pressurization is roughly equal to the outside air pressure. Since most airports are below this elevation, there is no pressure differential once the airplane is on the ground, therefore no need or even possibility for an airlock. It takes very little bleed air to pressurize when airborne so there isn't a significant cost in ...


17

I believe there are quite a few misconceptions here: When an aircraft is "pressurised", it means that at higher altitudes, the pressure inside the aircraft is higher than the pressure outside. At lower altitudes, the pressure is exactly the same inside and out. Originally, aircraft weren't pressurised, and at higher altitudes the low pressure is a problem ...


4

The only reason planes are pressurized is to allow the passengers the ability to breathe at flight altitude as if they were on the ground. If the plane is still or already on the ground, there would be no purpose in pressurizing it. Most metal bodied aircraft pressurize their cabins to about 8000 feet cabin pressure altitude. If the outside air is at a ...


4

Transport aircraft are certificated to a maximum operating temperature for departure that is related to International Standard Atmosphere (ISA), typically 35 deg C above ISA (there may be airplanes certified to ISA +40), ISA being 15C at sea level and dropping from there at the standard adiabatic lapse rate . ISA temperature at Phoenix airport at 1135 ft ...


45

It's likely to be a flare / flash bang for bird control. Schiphol uses these (amongst a wide variety of methods). Bird dispersal equipment There are various resources a bird controller can use to keep birds away from the runways. Standard equipment includes a flare gun with noise blanks, a bird alarm call system and a green laser. The ...


26

Likely a flash-bang for runway bird control. Birds on and near the runway are an ongoing major safety problem (witness the "Miracle on the Hudson", an A320 brought down by a flock of geese shutting down both engines). Measures to convince them to go elsewhere are only ever temporary and of limited effectiveness. One of the measures that is commonly used ...


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