Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
64

Gradual relocation essentially mean having to staff and equip nearly two full airports during the transition period. It is also annoying for the travelers that want to transfer planes and need to relocate to the other airport. They would then need to get transported to or from the new location and through security again unless a small short hop flight is ...


47

It allows them to do a run-up test of the engines without blowing debris at other parked aircraft, people, or things on the ground. [Credit to Ralph J] The walls have a structure that allows the noise of engine run-ups to be absorbed as well. Engine run-ups, especially multi-engine run ups, can be very loud. You can read more about IAC-Acoustics ground ...


43

Building an airport is a very expensive endeavor and usually involves government subsidies or is completely done by the local government. In recent decades, most government owned airports in Europe have however been transformed into companies that both own and operate the airport, usually with the government as initial owner of this company. Since this ...


41

Moving airline by airline doesn't help that much: You still have the same chaos, just on a per-airline basis. The airports you mention are dominated by large carriers that have turned them into hubs (Turkish Airlines and Lufthansa). Even if you move all the other airlines one by one, you still have much of the pain of the big move when you move the largest ...


33

Gradually moving between airports is a living nightmare for connecting travelers. Exactly that was done at Montreal Mirabel airport, a fabulous, spacious new replacement airport for Montreal Dorval (Trudeau). Montreal used to be Canada's main international hub. International flights were banned from the old airport, as incentive for airlines to move all ...


25

London Heathrow (LHR) is owned by a private company, Heathrow Airport Holdings. I'm sure there are many other examples around the world.


24

Where I work, we have to stay in the tower for 15 minutes after the last departure in case they need to return. To my knowledge, there are no international regulations about this, so the rules may well be different from place to place.


23

Not just departures. Assume an emergency takes place en route, and that airport with the closed runway is the only one available within a big area. What now? There are two things to distinguish: Operating hours Temporary surface (runway) closure If the airport is already 24/7, the tower will remain staffed. If not, once the airport closes on schedule, ...


23

ATC can not only ask for a minimum speed, but rather instruct each aircraft to (more or less) exactly fly at a particular speed. This is essential for maintaining separation. As J. Hougaard pointed out in the comments, the speed on the last 4 NM is always up to the pilot to slow down to final approach speed. It is the duty of the pilot to evaluate if it is ...


21

did Kai Tak have a straight-in approach to runway 13 for use by steep-approach-certified aircraft? During the 1990s I regularly flew the Hong Kong IGS approach in 747s. At that time, to the best of my knowledge, there was no straight-in approach to runway 13. only the best of the best pilots were allowed to shoot the bent approach to runway 13, and only ...


12

It looks like the reason for the Rwy 6 departure was noise abatement. The climb gradient from 6 is not as steep as for 24. The Jeppesen charts state the requirements: And it states that if you are unable to comply with the steeper noise abatement climb gradient for rwy 24 (583 ft climb per nautical mile), you should request 6 (300 ft climb per nautical mile)...


12

Approaches into Schiphol are usually vectored by ATC during the day (see below for night operations). This means the controllers are giving instructions to pilots depending on the current traffic, which makes it hard to say when exactly planes will overfly Egmond aan Zee. If the Polderbaan (runway 18R/36L) is used for landing from the North (18R), planes ...


12

Ground crew are typically employed by a handling agency, which is a company dedicated to performing ground handling of aircraft (exactly the things you describe). Some airports have several different handling agencies. Have you ever noticed, when waiting for your luggage to arrive at an airport, that there are several different help desks to choose from, ...


10

The major Australian airports were all privatized from the late 1990's. Smaller regional airports are still usually council-owned and operated.


7

ICAO Annex 10 Volume 1 has the answer: 3.1.2.7 At those locations where two separate ILS facilities serve opposite ends of a single runway, an interlock shall ensure that only the localizer serving the approach direction in use shall radiate, except where the localizer in operational use is Facility Performance Category I — ILS and no operationally ...


7

In New Zealand both Auckland and Wellington airports are privately owned. In both cases the local government have a non-majority shareholding which provides a fig leaf of representation but in reality nothing other than sincecures for local politicians . They are de-facto monopolies for the region they serve and manifest the types of behaviour you would ...


6

I don't have an authoritative source for what the various regulatory agencies in the various regions use for publishing their transition altitudes, but your assumption is pretty close: airspace is planned so that no airport is "that close" to the transition level. Some TAs are defined across large swaths, such as the US, Canadian, Australian TAs. Some TAs ...


6

Don't forget Punta Cana Airport, Dominican Republic. It was one of the first privately owned airports in the world.


5

Speaking of Sheremetyevo to continue @Bianfable answer, as of 23 April 2019: 66% are held by Sheremetyevo Holding which it turn is owned by an offshore cypriot TPS Avia Holding. TPS Avia Holding in turn: 65,22% are held by trust of Ponomaryenko abd Skorobogatko families and 34,78% Arkadiy Rotenberg. While that seems to be private owners, they are tightly ...


4

I could not find FAA requirements; however, there is an industry standard: SAE J348 (the details are behind a paywall). A 1993 flightsafety.org publication emphasizes that chock placement and design are essential, for example: The chock’s height is very important and it depends on the size of wheel to be restrained. For heavy transport aircraft, a six-...


4

They're being used in a different way than normal in that case. That's just a taxiway, not an engine run-up pad, so they aren't there to deflect max thrust jet blast. They've been arrayed "backwards" to kind of trap debris that gets blown toward the building as aircraft taxi by. That's my guess anyway.


4

During normal daytime operations aircraft are passing over the southern edge of Egmond aan Zee at 2000 ft (600m) altitude. They maintain 2000 ft until estabilshed on the ILS to runway 18R (or 18C). The aircraft come from the south (e.g. Portugal, Spain, France, Belgium) or west (UK, Ireland, Iceland, transatlantic) and descent to 2000 ft over the north sea. ...


4

My experience is when KUL moved from Subang (now SZB) to the new KL Intl Airport (KLIA). The moving date was declared way in advance, I seem to remember the date was locked more than 6 months before, and a lot of airlines rescheduled their ops especially the nightstopping aircraft. Obviously Malaysia Airlines had to ferry a bunch of planes over but its a ...


4

In the United States, there is only one privately owned and operated airport with scheduled commercial service: Branson, MO, which only has seasonal service to three other destinations. The vast majority of airports in the United States are at least publicly owned, and many (the majority, I believe) are publicly operated as well. The fact that airports in ...


3

ICAO Doc 4444 states the following: 7.15.4.1 Runway lighting shall not be operated if that runway is not in use for landing, take-off or taxiing purposes, unless required for runway inspections or maintenance. 7.15.4.2 If runway lighting is not operated continuously, lighting following a take-off shall be provided as specified below: a) at aerodromes ...


3

No, there is no limit. Aircraft stay as long in holding patterns as they have fuel on board.


3

Yes, at least if the airport is city owned (or owned by a municipality). For example Philadelphia's airports are city owned and they have landing fees as well as default repercussions 1.05. Payments Non-tenant Air Carriers and Operators not providing adequate surety or security in form and amount satisfactory to the Department of Commerce, to ...


2

KSFO has sidestep minima for ILS/LOC 28R to 28L but not from ILS/LOC 28L to 28R. It also has a sidestep from ILS/LOC 19L to 19R but no ILS at all for 19R itself. The latter is probably the more normal case for sidesteps: giving a second runway (probably one normally only used for departures) lower minima than circling without needing to install and ...


2

Actually that happened recently. For operational/load reasons, JFK needed to use tailwind landing runways, making them too short for the weight of an A380. The A380 asked controllers for a more suitable runway but they were unable to break the flow enough to allow that. (I also wonder if this A380 pilot was conservative, and other A380s were landing ...


2

At least in the US, there isn't any maximum holding time. The FAA's ATC Orders 4-6-1(c) give instructions for controllers, and they're allowed to issue an "indefinite" delay: When additional holding is expected at any other fix in your facility’s area, state the fix and your best estimate of the additional delay. [...] When holding is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible