64

Gradual relocation essentially mean having to staff and equip nearly two full airports during the transition period. It is also annoying for the travelers that want to transfer planes and need to relocate to the other airport. They would then need to get transported to or from the new location and through security again unless a small short hop flight is ...


45

It's likely to be a flare / flash bang for bird control. Schiphol uses these (amongst a wide variety of methods). Bird dispersal equipment There are various resources a bird controller can use to keep birds away from the runways. Standard equipment includes a flare gun with noise blanks, a bird alarm call system and a green laser. The ...


44

Building an airport is a very expensive endeavor and usually involves government subsidies or is completely done by the local government. In recent decades, most government owned airports in Europe have however been transformed into companies that both own and operate the airport, usually with the government as initial owner of this company. Since this ...


41

Moving airline by airline doesn't help that much: You still have the same chaos, just on a per-airline basis. The airports you mention are dominated by large carriers that have turned them into hubs (Turkish Airlines and Lufthansa). Even if you move all the other airlines one by one, you still have much of the pain of the big move when you move the largest ...


38

The main example in the question body is to confine the wing from the main taxiway, which runs across the bottom of the image. It may not seem like it, but a 50 m (164 ft) wide plane like those tankers parked at a 45-degree angle saves ~15 m (approx. one-third of its wingspan). The reference used by the USAF is AFMAN 32-1084 (PDF), from which: 2.1.5.4.1....


33

Gradually moving between airports is a living nightmare for connecting travelers. Exactly that was done at Montreal Mirabel airport, a fabulous, spacious new replacement airport for Montreal Dorval (Trudeau). Montreal used to be Canada's main international hub. International flights were banned from the old airport, as incentive for airlines to move all ...


26

Likely a flash-bang for runway bird control. Birds on and near the runway are an ongoing major safety problem (witness the "Miracle on the Hudson", an A320 brought down by a flock of geese shutting down both engines). Measures to convince them to go elsewhere are only ever temporary and of limited effectiveness. One of the measures that is commonly used ...


25

London Heathrow (LHR) is owned by a private company, Heathrow Airport Holdings. I'm sure there are many other examples around the world.


24

Where I work, we have to stay in the tower for 15 minutes after the last departure in case they need to return. To my knowledge, there are no international regulations about this, so the rules may well be different from place to place.


23

Not just departures. Assume an emergency takes place en route, and that airport with the closed runway is the only one available within a big area. What now? There are two things to distinguish: Operating hours Temporary surface (runway) closure If the airport is already 24/7, the tower will remain staffed. If not, once the airport closes on schedule, ...


23

did Kai Tak have a straight-in approach to runway 13 for use by steep-approach-certified aircraft? During the 1990s I regularly flew the Hong Kong IGS approach in 747s. At that time, to the best of my knowledge, there was no straight-in approach to runway 13. only the best of the best pilots were allowed to shoot the bent approach to runway 13, and only ...


23

ATC can not only ask for a minimum speed, but rather instruct each aircraft to (more or less) exactly fly at a particular speed. This is essential for maintaining separation. As J. Hougaard pointed out in the comments, the speed on the last 4 NM is always up to the pilot to slow down to final approach speed. It is the duty of the pilot to evaluate if it is ...


17

I believe there are quite a few misconceptions here: When an aircraft is "pressurised", it means that at higher altitudes, the pressure inside the aircraft is higher than the pressure outside. At lower altitudes, the pressure is exactly the same inside and out. Originally, aircraft weren't pressurised, and at higher altitudes the low pressure is a problem ...


12

It looks like the reason for the Rwy 6 departure was noise abatement. The climb gradient from 6 is not as steep as for 24. The Jeppesen charts state the requirements: And it states that if you are unable to comply with the steeper noise abatement climb gradient for rwy 24 (583 ft climb per nautical mile), you should request 6 (300 ft climb per nautical mile)...


12

Ground crew are typically employed by a handling agency, which is a company dedicated to performing ground handling of aircraft (exactly the things you describe). Some airports have several different handling agencies. Have you ever noticed, when waiting for your luggage to arrive at an airport, that there are several different help desks to choose from, ...


12

Approaches into Schiphol are usually vectored by ATC during the day (see below for night operations). This means the controllers are giving instructions to pilots depending on the current traffic, which makes it hard to say when exactly planes will overfly Egmond aan Zee. If the Polderbaan (runway 18R/36L) is used for landing from the North (18R), planes ...


10

The major Australian airports were all privatized from the late 1990's. Smaller regional airports are still usually council-owned and operated.


7

In New Zealand both Auckland and Wellington airports are privately owned. In both cases the local government have a non-majority shareholding which provides a fig leaf of representation but in reality nothing other than sincecures for local politicians . They are de-facto monopolies for the region they serve and manifest the types of behaviour you would ...


6

Don't forget Punta Cana Airport, Dominican Republic. It was one of the first privately owned airports in the world.


5

Speaking of Sheremetyevo to continue @Bianfable answer, as of 23 April 2019: 66% are held by Sheremetyevo Holding which it turn is owned by an offshore cypriot TPS Avia Holding. TPS Avia Holding in turn: 65,22% are held by trust of Ponomaryenko abd Skorobogatko families and 34,78% Arkadiy Rotenberg. While that seems to be private owners, they are tightly ...


4

I could not find FAA requirements; however, there is an industry standard: SAE J348 (the details are behind a paywall). A 1993 flightsafety.org publication emphasizes that chock placement and design are essential, for example: The chock’s height is very important and it depends on the size of wheel to be restrained. For heavy transport aircraft, a six-...


4

My experience is when KUL moved from Subang (now SZB) to the new KL Intl Airport (KLIA). The moving date was declared way in advance, I seem to remember the date was locked more than 6 months before, and a lot of airlines rescheduled their ops especially the nightstopping aircraft. Obviously Malaysia Airlines had to ferry a bunch of planes over but its a ...


4

During normal daytime operations aircraft are passing over the southern edge of Egmond aan Zee at 2000 ft (600m) altitude. They maintain 2000 ft until estabilshed on the ILS to runway 18R (or 18C). The aircraft come from the south (e.g. Portugal, Spain, France, Belgium) or west (UK, Ireland, Iceland, transatlantic) and descent to 2000 ft over the north sea. ...


4

In the United States, there is only one privately owned and operated airport with scheduled commercial service: Branson, MO, which only has seasonal service to three other destinations. The vast majority of airports in the United States are at least publicly owned, and many (the majority, I believe) are publicly operated as well. The fact that airports in ...


4

Transport aircraft are certificated to a maximum operating temperature for departure that is related to International Standard Atmosphere (ISA), typically 35 deg C above ISA (there may be airplanes certified to ISA +40), ISA being 15C at sea level and dropping from there at the standard adiabatic lapse rate . ISA temperature at Phoenix airport at 1135 ft ...


4

The only reason planes are pressurized is to allow the passengers the ability to breathe at flight altitude as if they were on the ground. If the plane is still or already on the ground, there would be no purpose in pressurizing it. Most metal bodied aircraft pressurize their cabins to about 8000 feet cabin pressure altitude. If the outside air is at a ...


4

Prologue: the quote in the question is from Wikipedia, and the parts there that mention the designation to commercial aircraft emergencies have later been marked as "citation needed". Therefore, for as long as an authoritative source can not be verified, it might well be that in reality there is no such designation. Actually, should the nature of the ...


3

Yes, at least if the airport is city owned (or owned by a municipality). For example Philadelphia's airports are city owned and they have landing fees as well as default repercussions 1.05. Payments Non-tenant Air Carriers and Operators not providing adequate surety or security in form and amount satisfactory to the Department of Commerce, to ...


3

ICAO Doc 4444 states the following: 7.15.4.1 Runway lighting shall not be operated if that runway is not in use for landing, take-off or taxiing purposes, unless required for runway inspections or maintenance. 7.15.4.2 If runway lighting is not operated continuously, lighting following a take-off shall be provided as specified below: a) at aerodromes ...


3

No, there is no limit. Aircraft stay as long in holding patterns as they have fuel on board.


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