Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
70

Because those symbols are easily confused with the number 0, the number 1 and the symbol for a closed runway/taxiway (✕) respectively. (1) Numbers by themselves, and the letters "I" and "O" must not be used because they could be mistaken for a runway number. (2) The letter "X" must not be used because a sign with an "X" could be ...


54

Windsocks come in various sizes and speeds, but an FAA Standard Wind Sock aligns with the wind at 3 knots, and is fully extended at 15 knots like CGCampbell pointed out. A typical wind sock (at least around here) looks something like this: The stripes are actually useful: The first stripe indicates a 3-knot breeze (The wind sock has turned and aligned ...


37

That is a Compass Rose, painted on a Compass Calibration Pad. It's used to mark a location on the airport surface that is suitable for calibrating the compass of an aircraft. Here's one in a slightly different style: and a more basic one from an FAA diagram: More information on the requirements for the compass rose / compass pad can be found in AC 150/...


36

"RTF Instructions" probably means "Radiotelephone Instructions" As suggested here, it should not be confused (as I initially did) with the "RTF" of internet fame (from RTFM, for those that are still wondering after reading the translation below), meaning something completely different: Ophelia und ich, die beide mehr Ahnung vom Internet als von der ...


32

They are "Rapid Exit Taxiway Indicator Lights" as described in section 9.6 of CAP 637. 9.6 Rapid Exit Taxiway Indicator Lights 9.6.1 Rapid exit taxiway indicator lights (RETILs) provide pilots with distance to go information to the nearest rapid exit taxiway on the runway, to enhance situational awareness in low visibility conditions ...


29

It is a wind tee; it serves the same function as a wind sock. It is designed to resemble an airplane from the air so that pilots overflying the field can more easily determine in which direction they should land. The top of the "T" is the front of the airplane and represents the direction in which an airplane should land. When the wind hits the vertical ...


29

Seems to be touchdown zone markings for assault landing practice by C-17's. For assault landings, the standard is to touch down in the first 500' of the Landing Zone (LZ), and to go around if your mains aren't on the ground by the 500' point. On a dirt LZ, there will typically be panels set out to mark the threshold, the 500' point, and the far threshold -- ...


28

R is for Restricted. From the chart supplement (formerly AF/D) that runway (8-26) is restricted for agricultural use only. It's non-standard, both internationally (ICAO) and on the FAA level for Part 139 airports (see AC 150/5340-1M). Note that the airport is neither international nor Part 139, so standards may not apply. (via skyvector.com) Beyond the ...


25

That would be the "line" telling military pilots where the arresting cables are. If you look to the side of those circles, you can see the arresting mechanism these. It would be yellow so that it would still stand out to the pilot and not be confused with the white runway markings. You can find more about them here.


24

That direction (284) is the true heading, but runways are numbered according to the magnetic heading. Runways are usually numbered according to their direction, more precisely called runway magnetic bearing or QFU (see Q codes). (How are runways numbered?) For KTEX: 276 magnetic, 285 true 096 magnetic, 105 true While 276 should be rounded to runway ...


23

It is not a road that you are looking at, it is the edge of the runway / taxiway. The double yellow lines are used to define the taxiway edge from the shoulder or some other abutting paved surface not intended for use by aircraft. The blue lights in the yellow boxes are taxiway edge lights. The poles next to the lights are blue reflective markers that ...


23

It's a lighted 'wind tee'. this website shows various wind direction indicators


23

That's the aiming point mark, UK style. The UK AIP GEN 1.7 (2018-8) notes the following reasons for the different marking: The shape of the marking means that 1/3rd of it is outside the centre 3rd of the runway and is therefore less prone to rubber contamination. The marking is more easily identifiable as it differs from the TDZ markings. It ...


21

The first one is the holding position marking. It denotes the entrance from the taxiway into the runway. The dashed lines are in the side of the runway. The second one is the non movement area boundary mainly for vehicles, which divides the movement and non-movement areas of boundary- the movement area is on the dashed line, for moving into which you'll ...


20

A large number of airports in the world are used for both civil and military operations and quite a few of these have arresting systems installed on them. According to Boeing Aero No. 13: Of the nearly 36,000 airports around the world that are classified as civil, military, or joint-use, approximately 3,800 are used for scheduled commercial service. ...


18

I dug around for a while but couldn't find any official documentation on this (I suspect someone whose Japanese is better than mine will have to do that.) But! I did find the markings on all of the Haneda Airport runways and I noticed they were roughly halfway along the length of the entire physical runway. A little bit of measuring confirmed my ...


18

This sign is a taxiway ending marker. I retrieved this graphic from the CFI Notebook Website.


17

It's a maritime navigation aid. I'm fairly rusty, but I'm pretty sure it's a form of lead mark. When seen from the water, as you travel towards the mark, if you keep the diamond centred between the circled dots, it will have you travelling in a straight line down the centre/safest path of a channel. It will normally be associated with a channel through ...


16

Most aircraft compasses include compensating magnets to correct for installation error (due to natural magnetic fields in an aircraft from steel parts and electrical equipment). When installing a new compass or performing significant electrical work on an aircraft the compass may need to be re-calibrated and the compensating magnets adjusted (typically by ...


16

I'm fairly sure that sign is beside taxiway C*, and as you can see from the aerodrome chart it is right next to the main apron. Aircraft holding in this position have the main apron directly behind them. The sign is instructing pilots to use the minimum thrust necessary to move off from that position, as there could be personnel, vehicles etc on the apron. ...


14

The item in the red box looks like a plastic stick that has reflective stickers on it which identify the taxiway edge even when there are several inches of snow (enough to bury the taxiway lights). Low-tech but it seems to work, and you can observe similar devices at many northern tier airports. Others can be seen near the blue boxes, slightly lower in the ...


13

These markings designate the hold-short point during different runway operations. Runway hold-short points are marked by white text on a red background. They designate a point which any aircraft must not cross without an explicit clearance from ATC. Note that in the below picture, there are two markings: Cat II or III ILS is used during low visibility ...


13

According to the FAA, Advisory Circular 150/5345-27E, dtd 26 Sep 2013, Paragraph 3.2.2, 3.2.2 Dimensions The taper or the fabric windsock from the throat to the trailing end must be designed to cause the windsock to fully extend when exposed to a wind of 15 knots (28 km/hr or 17 mph). The paragraph, 4.2.6 Windsock Extension gives the ...


12

ICAO Annex 14 specifies the need for 6 pairs of touchdown zone markings for runways with a landing distance available of 2400 metres or more. As noted in Annex 14, the number of markings relates to the landing distance available. Presumably, the rule is there to make it easy for a pilot approaching the runway to make sure the runway is long enough if, for ...


12

Those are not chevrons but arrowheads used to mark the start of the runway. So, yes, he did land on the taxiway. Source: FAA Airfield Standards Quick Reference He does land slightly before the runway threshold. He even says he is going to land short. Since there was nothing on the taxiway leading to the runway then it seems there is no problem doing that. ...


11

In the U.S., taxiway number/nomenclature is generally designed in accordance with FAA AC 150/5340-18F. Also, Engineering Brief 89 available here clarifies some of the information in the AC with respect to taxiway numbering/nomenclature. The two pages shown below summarize the guidelines for numbering (from Engineering Brief 89) Also, note the general ...


11

"X" marks a closed runway or an airstrip where aircraft may not land. See this temporary marker as an example of how it is used. I have tow-launched hang gliders from an old WWII airstrip in Suffolk (England), which was shared with microlight pilots. We had one of these markers which we laid out before flying, to prevent other aircraft from inadvertently ...


10

It's essentially "fake grass" -- a "no taxi" / "no drive" area, the same as real grass would be. The concrete may very possibly be stressed to support the full weight of big aircraft, and the areas are painted that way simply as a matter of keeping traffic flow in the designated areas, although it's possible that some areas marked that way may not be in a ...


10

(Click either to view) Short answer: Canada paints them by the book. They're not small. Ottawa airport conforms to the standards set by ICAO Annex 14 for airport design. Those standards guarantee the legibility of the numbers. 5.2.2.6 The numbers and letters shall be in the form and proportion shown in Figure 5-3. The dimensions shall be not less than ...


10

The line along taxiway centreline is meant to provide guidance before initiating the turn. You're right that in a large aircraft they would lose sight of the centreline when they're over it, but it gives the pilot an idea of where they need to keep the nose in order to keep the outer main wheels behind them on the taxiway surface.  For example, in Canada, ...


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