61

Yes. (I found this by Aaron Holmes's hint that he searched only English sources.) On 1999 Feb 12 at 3:40 pm, a Grob G103 sailplane F-CGXB (possibly "in wave flight") collided with an Airbus A 320 F-GJVG at 8600 feet, near Montpellier, France. Both landed safely with minor damage. There were no casualties. Summary: https://aviation-safety.net/...


53

GA refers to why you fly your plane, not what kind of plane it is. For example, John Travolta has (had?) his own personal Boeing 707, which is the first generation of jet airliner from Boeing. When he flew it, it was not under scheduled service, so it would be classified as a "general aviation" flight.


44

There is actually some data (albeit limited) on this scenario: On August 21st 1961 this test was performed in a DC-8. When this test was performed they were supersonic for about 16 seconds which took a lot of planning to pull off. You first need to climb higher than the plane typically does to have enough altitude to pull this off, then make sure you ...


43

To the first part of your question, the airplane is not moving BECAUSE his yoke movements are "strong and fast". Experienced pilots can feel a gust and respond with a control input to counter it before it has enough time to affect the aircraft. (You really can't appreciate this from a camera fixed to the airframe.) As mentioned in a comment, this ...


28

In general, an incorrect takeoff weight can have serious consequences for an airliner, especially when the actual TOW is close to the RTOW (regulated takeoff weight, see e.g. this question: What is RTOW and how is it different from MTOW?). It is possible that the aircraft is unable to takeoff within the available runway length. This is particularly important ...


26

Yes, but the challenge is managing the asymmetric thrust effects when applying power during the stall recovery. Pilots are trained in the sim for two stall (actually, just stick shaker onset) situations: high altitude and low altitude. Low altitude stall recovery training is normally done by slowing until the stick shaker starts, then adding max thrust ...


23

For "what kinds of problems can appear", there's the case of Air Midwest Flight 5481, which crashed on takeoff partly due to a miscalculation of passenger weight. In addition to needing additional power to accelerate the additional mass, the distribution of passenger weight can also affect where the center of gravity of the plane is. If the center ...


23

A stall recovery doesn't require engines (although they help, especially if altitude is an issue). To recover from a stall, you need to lower the angle of attack. You can do this by lowering the nose until airspeed picks up, no engines required provided you have altitude to spare.


21

Why pilot make so much input,I dont see that plane is moving even his yoke movements are huge and fast? The plane isn’t moving much because as soon as the pilot senses either wing lifting, he is making a correction to counteract it. Since he is flying in a gusty crosswind, that means many such corrections are required to keep the plane stable. For person ...


20

With enough height, any aircraft can recover from a stall without any engine power required. In fact, for under-wing engined aircraft like the 787, it is sometimes necessary to reduce the thrust, because of the pitch-up tendency this engine placement provides. The technique in a stall recovery is always, always to reduce the angle of attack, which is easiest ...


18

As already said in the other answers, the "huge" inputs to the yoke are to keep the aircraft stable on the approach path. There is no "panic" involved, it is simply necessary due to the gusty conditions. Let me expand a bit more on your second question: Can airliners land with auto pilot on strong windy day [...]? The answer to this a ...


17

Searching through the Aviation Herald database for incidences with the word tree, I found 3 cases: An Eagle Air Let L410 contacted a tree during departure from Lankien in South Sudan. The right wing tip was damaged, but the aircraft continued to its destination, where the wing tip was repaired: A China Eastern Airbus A320 contacted trees during a go-around ...


16

The TWA Flight 841 accident in 1979 involving a Boeing 727 comes pretty close to your conditions. Not a zero-G dive but an unintended spiral dive starting at 39,000 feet, reaching mach 0.96 at 31,800 feet, becoming a 90 degree nose-down dive at 29,000 feet with total loss of control authority. With speed brakes ineffective, the pilot extended the landing ...


15

What powers the airconditioning on most airliners is APU or main engine compressor bleed, which is being supplied at fairly high pressure, say, 80 psi, and temperature, around 3-400F, to the air conditioning packs. You normally have a choice to select APU or main engine bleed. You will obviously use APU bleed on the ground before engine start, but also may ...


14

As far as I know, there is no actual flying boat in use at an airline. The flying boats that are still in commercial operation are typically used for fighting forest fires or maritime patrol. This may change in the near future since there are currently at least two flying boats in development that might be used by airlines: Dornier Seastar CD2: This is a ...


13

Why pilot make so much input,I dont see that plane is moving even his yoke movements are huge and fast? For person who not fly,it looks panic. Look at the artificial horizon. It has a scale at the top that allows you to see even small variations in bank angle. When looking there, you'll see that the plane IS actually moving a lot. E.g. at 00:44 in your ...


11

The Airbus A320 has an ECAM (Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitor) Door Page: (A320 FCOM - Doors - Controls and Indicators) When a door is opened, this will also trigger a caution. According to the FCOM, a MASTER CAUT is triggered together with a SINGLE CHIME. The lower ECAM page will also automatically switch to the Door page. Other aircraft may have ...


11

I think it is interesting to look at this problem from a control engineering perspective. Towards the runway, it is more important to track the centerline and glideslope. In control terms, better reference tracking is achieved by a higher control bandwidth ('crossover frequency'). As a crude first approximation, an airplane is a rotational inertia system and ...


11

The crew would not notice a 1200 kg overload on an airplane the size of a 737. The weight error will likely be randomly distributed with little C of G impact, and for an overload to be noticeable, there would have to be a significant change in performance at rotation that surprises the crew. This will show up as an unexpected lag in lift off following ...


8

There is at least one jet flying boat, the Beriev B-200, in production. The Wikipedia article gives it a capacity of 72 passengers. I don't know how many (if any) are employed in an airliner role, though this variant has a "pressurised and air conditioned cabin allowing transportation of up to 72 passengers. The passenger variant is the BE-210 shown ...


8

Last time I was there (fifteen or so years ago) there was a thriving commercial air passenger operation, including at least a couple scheduled flights (weekly, I believe, not daily), at the north end of Lake Washington (near Seattle), officially in either Bothell or Woodinville, Washington state (comments reminded me it's Kenmore Air, in Kenmore, WA). There ...


8

Yes, for example an MD-83 operating as American Airlines flight 1572 impacted trees on a ridgeline (and an ILS antenna!) on approach to Bradley Internal Airport in Connecticut in 1995. It ultimately landed short with no fatalities and one "minor" injury. The NTSB report AAR96-05 is currently here, but probably subject to link rot (so I'll post the ...


7

Large commercial aircraft have low wings to easily stow away their long landing gears in the wing root, to hide the wing spar carry-through below the passenger deck, and to improve the accessibility of wing-mounted engines. Long gears make it possible to stretch the fuselage and still be able to rotate during take-off. Stretching makes it possible to ...


7

The position of the sun's reflection on the fuselage nose shows that it is positioned very low – a clear indication of an Embraer type. The lower wing sweep and the long tailcone also indicate as much and are a clear indication against a larger twin like the Boeing 737 or the A320. This leaves the E 179, 175, 190 or 195 as possible candidates. The 190/195 ...


6

Four or five years ago or so, Pacific Coastal Airlines spun off its seaplane division as Wilderness Seaplanes, which flies scheduled service in a fleet of four Grumman Gooses in British Columbia.


6

With straight wings the root extension method is very common. Airplanes that come to mind are Me-109 H (high altitude version with increased span) Beech Twin Bonanza and Model 65 Queen Air (used the Bonanza wing from the engines out) SB-10 (uses SB-9 wings stuck to a new carbon-epoxy center wing). This is impractical with swept wings because of the strong ...


6

The lines on the nose radome (radar dome) of airplanes are called segmented lightning diverter strips, and they're made by a few different companies, one of which is Weather Guard Lightning Tech Electric charge builds up on the nose of the plane (on the radome) as makes contact with high-velocity particles in the air, which include rain, ice crystals and ...


6

Cost. Those would be expensive, and the business is bad already. Now, you might think that just any mesh, fabric or membrane would do, but but to be effective against the sperad of viruses, nope. Discomfort. Imagine how it would feel to be bagged up like that for hours. Again, despite the membrane being a "breathing" sort, it would still get rather ...


6

Based on the formula already shown in this answer, we can calculate the TAT (true air temperature), which is the temperature reached at the stagnation point1, from the SAT (static air temperature) and Mach number: $$ \frac{\text{TAT}}{\text{SAT}} = 1 + \frac{\gamma - 1}{2} M^2 = 1 + \frac{1}{5} M^2 $$ The resulting plot of TAT vs. Mach number at the SAT of -...


6

After you break the sound barrier, a shock wave will be generated in front of your main wings and tail wings. Though the design of wings on modern planes may hold that situation and can still generate some lift (which is impossible for traditional wings, leading to a fatal stall), the control surfaces on your main wings and tail wings will nearly lose their ...


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