28

In general, an incorrect takeoff weight can have serious consequences for an airliner, especially when the actual TOW is close to the RTOW (regulated takeoff weight, see e.g. this question: What is RTOW and how is it different from MTOW?). It is possible that the aircraft is unable to takeoff within the available runway length. This is particularly important ...


26

Yes, but the challenge is managing the asymmetric thrust effects when applying power during the stall recovery. Pilots are trained in the sim for two stall (actually, just stick shaker onset) situations: high altitude and low altitude. Low altitude stall recovery training is normally done by slowing until the stick shaker starts, then adding max thrust ...


23

For "what kinds of problems can appear", there's the case of Air Midwest Flight 5481, which crashed on takeoff partly due to a miscalculation of passenger weight. In addition to needing additional power to accelerate the additional mass, the distribution of passenger weight can also affect where the center of gravity of the plane is. If the center ...


23

A stall recovery doesn't require engines (although they help, especially if altitude is an issue). To recover from a stall, you need to lower the angle of attack. You can do this by lowering the nose until airspeed picks up, no engines required provided you have altitude to spare.


20

With enough height, any aircraft can recover from a stall without any engine power required. In fact, for under-wing engined aircraft like the 787, it is sometimes necessary to reduce the thrust, because of the pitch-up tendency this engine placement provides. The technique in a stall recovery is always, always to reduce the angle of attack, which is easiest ...


11

The crew would not notice a 1200 kg overload on an airplane the size of a 737. The weight error will likely be randomly distributed with little C of G impact, and for an overload to be noticeable, there would have to be a significant change in performance at rotation that surprises the crew. This will show up as an unexpected lag in lift off following ...


5

Takeoff performance calculations include not only weight, but balance. Part of the output from takeoff calculations include airspeeds (which are based on weight, temperature, runway conditions, runway selection, runway length, wind, and other factors such as reduced power selection, flap use, etc. Takeoff calculations also include the pitch trim setting to ...


5

Before take-off, pilots enter a number of figures into the flight computers. Among them, they enter: The total weight of the plane Adjusted thrust No sense using full thrust on a lightly loaded plane (which would get you a very short take-off) when you could reduce thrust a bit even if that means using a longer part of the runway. As has been shown in the ...


3

For one example, read the report in one ASRS Callback issue under the heading, "The Bod Squad". It's about a B727 carrying a football team. Long takeoff roll, poor climb, and inability to reach planned altitude are some of the problems mentioned. Fortunately, the flight was completed without any mishap. But the potential for an accident was ...


2

It really depends on the aircraft. A DC-8 is known to have done this. (https://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/i-was-there-when-the-dc-8-went-supersonic-27846699/) There are 2 sources of stress on the airframe in this situation- airliners aren't designed to fly past Mach 1 (except the Concorde and Tu-144...), so there's one issue. There's also the ...


2

There was a bit of a bounce and skip at touchdown along with the nosewheel bouncing due to the uneven ground and aggressive landing. He was probably doing it to hold the nosewheel off after the bounce, to reduce the main wheel contact force somewhat (the normal soft field landing technique) but it looks to me like he overcontrolled with the pitch a bit. ...


1

Theoretically, if the Neutral Point was still aft of the C of G with the tail gone, you could still be statically stable to some degree, but without the trimming surfaces of the elevator/stab providing the pitching force-balance system to control AOA, you become statically stable about the wing's zero-pitching-moment AOA somewhere, and you are more or less a ...


1

No - though the vertical stabilizer might be worked around, the same is not true for the horizonal stablizer. Without it you will loose stability in the pitch axis so much that I doubt there will be any chance for a controlled flight on nearly all aircaft (though there is a possibility that a few ones might remain some kind of controllability)


1

Recovery with one operative engine is possible, requiring a reduced angle of attack to break the stall, then accelerating, and adding power in proportion to the increasing rudder authority. A slight bank toward the side with the operative engine would help, but only enough to null sideslip (center the ball) as thrust is increased. Gradually accelerate and ...


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