39

I don't know where he gets that. Regulation wise there's nothing stopping an airline pilot from listening to music as long as he/she can hear ambient sounds or communications and modern headsets make it easy to link an ipod to headphones that are also receiving the comms. Pilots are allowed to take naps in flight as long as they are awake within 45 min of ...


28

Well, a wristwatch can't be used to sneak around the requirement that IFR requires a clock mounted in the aircraft, FAR 91.205(d)(6). A missing or inoperative clock isn't likely in a modern airliner. As far as the FAA is concerned, a wristwatch is nothing more than jewelry. Ages ago, a wristwatch may have helped with calculating fuel burn and range, but ...


25

Capt left, 1st officer or copilot right. On older airlines with a flight engineer, he is behind and is called 2nd officer. It's the same as a ship. Capt is boss, 1st officer is second in command, 2nd officer if on board is 3rd in command. Capt always starts the engines and taxis the airplane since most airliners only have a steering tiller on the left, ...


20

While airliners don't have "model years" like cars do, they are certainly changed over time. There are major "generations" of some aircraft types, like the 737. The "original" (-100,-200) was replaced by the "Classic" (-300,-400,-500) which was replaced by the "Next Generation" (-600,-700,-800,-900) and most recently replaced by the "MAX" (-7,-8,-9,-10). ...


18

The title of Captain designates that he(she) has final authority during the flight, and First Officer is assisting. Ultimately, a Captain may make critical decisions regarding the flight. In practice and ideally, the Captain and FO will work collaboratively, and there won't be a need to "pull rank". The terms Pilot and Co-Pilot are actually rarely used ...


15

The answer depends greatly on the airline's operations, as the constraints are very different between long-haul and short-haul trips, whether relief crews are required, layover times, need and distribution of reserve pilots, and other factors: some pilots employed by an airline will be performing management duties, on leave, training, etc. Assuming the ...


9

To the extent that there is any sort of "rank" amongst airline pilots, seniority comes first. The most senior pilot gets his choice of aircraft, schedules, vacations, and so on; the next most senior pilot gets his choice from everything that's left, and so on until the most junior pilot gets what's left over that nobody senior to him wanted. So the pilot ...


9

This is likely to be a subject where the answer varies by jurisdiction. In the USA, there are some limits for pilots flying commercial airliners in scheduled airline passenger service (i.e. Part 121 operations.) In particular, most of the types of devices that would be used to play said music are banned for use by pilots during all phases of flight in Part ...


8

In the end it's all up to the Captain. If the FO is PF, which with most airlines alternates with each leg of a block, and something exciting happens, the capt may let the FO continue flying if the capt feels the FO has things under control. Or the capt may say "I have control" and take over. Depends. The Pilot In Command is pilot in command. He/she ...


6

I couldn't comment on this post here, but check this out: Is it allowed to listen to music while piloting a plane? Not exactly sure where you heard from this 747 pilot but I'm pretty sure it's allowed by the FAA. If it's not allowed for that specific pilot it may be from company policies. Just some ideas though, maybe the music could be distracting to the ...


6

As with everything it varies from airline to airline, but for the most part it is option 2). Larger carriers will usually give pilots the option of blacklisting another if they wish, but smaller airlines with only a few dozen pilot combinations might just tell the pilot to suck it up. The airline will also avoid placing a brand new FO with a brand new ...


6

A pilot is someone who takes direct part in flying an aircraft by manipulating flight controls. A captain is a person who can (in the sense of is capable of and legally permitted to) act as a pilot, and who has been hired or promoted by their employer to the rank of captain. They are normally the highest-ranking working employee of the operator aboard the ...


6

In short, yes it is a lot like travel on the road. There are treaty agreements that came from the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation in the 1940s which allow quite a substantial freedom of international travel and cross recognition of pilot certificates. In the USA most routes are open to most pilots, the restrictions are based on the ...


6

Uniforms are to make it easy to identify members of a group who have a separate function or authority from a larger more random group. The stripes are to easy to identify the chain of command within this group at a glance. Most of the time it's all just costume peagentry. When the shmoozle hits the fan however, being able to identify who's in charge and ...


5

Recent discussion with friends who work or worked for one major US airline, say they never witnessed such a thing. One of them points out that on Navy P3 flights, they would do it to newbies. Not often, but sometimes to recalibrate newbies. With respect to commercial flights, all pointed out that flight attendants are at high risk for injury, and would ...


5

What you're worried about is hitting turbulence. The word "impact" isn't typically used, although hail impacting an airplane has on relatively rare occasions damaged airplanes in flight and even more rarely has brought them down. My experience was that it just makes a lot of noise on the windshield. Your question title is more inclusive than the body. ...


5

Airports In general, there are three main types of airports: public, private, and military. You can visit the same types of locations in your car, and they have somewhat similar restrictions. Military and private airports will typically require prior permission to land there, and will want to know what business you have going there. Public airports will ...


4

Make your own checklists While the manufacturer provided check lists are a good starting point and generally cover the operation of the aircraft well the FAA does not forbid you from extending them. If you have a few more steps you feel are worthy of a checklist write up and print your own. If you are switching tanks it sounds like you are flying a piper. ...


4

Autoland currency If equipped with autoland, the flight crew will have some requirement to use the system, or else autoland operation in real CAT III weather, where autoland is required, will be prohibited. For many types, this also applies to the aircraft itself. Currency is satisfied by conducting a successful autoland in any weather, so in periods of ...


4

Basic officer training in the RAF takes 30 weeks, so you're already over your six months, even before you start pilot training. When you sign up you enlist for a minimum period which varies according to your speciality. Six to twelve years is typical. Source Assuming you get through pilot training and make it to a squadron, you're not going to just sit ...


3

In an interview I read, a 747 captain.... You refer to him as a captain. However, in the article's image, he's sitting in the first officer's seat and is wearing three stripes, so it would appear that he's not a captain. ... why he cannot listen to music inflight, when for example surgeons – who literally hold peoples' lives in their hands – can.... A ...


3

Well, that will depend on variable information sources. For example: how many pilots are currently working in this company? How many aircraft? Do you have cargo or only passenger aircraft? Is it a single aisle or double aisle aircraft? What is the average flying time per pilot in that company? What is the average flying time for this airline per month? So ...


3

All of the most significant countries prohibit smoking on airline flights, either through national, industry, or airline regulations. This applies to crew through different regulations, but as strictly as to the passengers. Pilots can and sometimes do smoke in the cockpits of business jets. These can be as large as airliners (see BBJ), but usually aren't.


2

For fuel, you can tack that on to various checklists so that every time you do anything, it becomes a habit to check whether you're on the fuller tank. For cross-country trips, the "anything" includes passing each checkpoint--which should be a lot less than 30 minutes apart. There are also apps and other devices that can be set to go off every 30 mins, but ...


2

As for changing radio frequency, that becomes 2nd nature after a while. If using ATC services (such as flight following, and I highly encourage that), you'll be prompted to change frequency from them to the local field after you let them you know you have the field in sight. If not using ATC, you'll find you know to change when you don't hear anyone from ...


2

Qualification for being a pilot-in-command in mutli-crew aircraft (i.e. captain) is independent of type rating (i.e. qualification to fly specific aircraft type). And similarly with the multi-crew rating required to fly a multi-crew aircraft at all (i.e. as F/O). Therefore the airline selects some pilots and sends them to appropriate training to get the ...


2

Being certified to fly a certain airplane is a type rating. There is no ranking of airplanes like you mention. If you have a B737 type rating you are not allowed to fly the B747 or the other way around unless you have the type rating for that aircraft. The list of type ratings that the FAA uses can be found on their website. Getting a type rating while ...


2

Pilots will have a "Type Certification" that ensures they have been trained and can operate a specific model, or group of models that have identical cockpits. The classic example is the 757/767, the 757 being a narrow-body and smaller plane, but both have the same cockpit layout, so a pilot can go from one to another without issue. This FAA Document (PDF) ...


2

Apples and oranges. A PIREP is a report of current weather conditions at a specific location. An AIREP is primarily a position report, required of some aircraft that are not under radar control. Whereas the primary purpose of a PIREP is to report unusual weather conditions or things like turbulence and are not mandatory, AIREP's are in many cases mandatory ...


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