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3

The MQ-1B uses three different airfoils: Drela GW-19, GW-25 and GW-27, created by Dr. Mark Drela (one of the creators of the XFOIL software) and proprietary to General Atomics. The airfoils used on the MQ-1B (Drela GW-19, GW-25, GW-27, created by Dr. Mark Drela) are proprietary material of General Atomics, Dr. Drela personally stated on a hobbyist remote-...


1

I propose you first read this answer. The flow over the wing is accelerated along the pressure gradient (or orthogonal to the isobars), and this gradient is swept with the wing. Therefore, acceleration and deceleration is orthogonal to the direction of wingspan. The spanwise speed component remains unaffected.


0

It's not guaranteed that the missile/bomb will stay upright relative to an asymmetrical wing throughout its whole flight, and if it were to wind up inverted, the range would be shorter and the package would fall short of its target. That might mean on civilians or friendly forces, and that's not good. Asymmetrical airfoils are effective, and they get the job ...


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Most missiles fly at such high speeds and manoeuvre so violently that "up" means very little to them, it is simply a mild error to be corrected for. Cruciform wings and tails are designed solely for manoeuvrability in whatever direction the missile needs at that moment. After a bit of that, there is no predicting which way up the missile will be by ...


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Assymetrical wings on missiles/guided bombs do exist. However the goal of all missiles/guided bombs is to hit or come close to its target, which mean different things for various missiles. This drives their design: Symmetrical airfoils on missiles are used in order to guarantee uniform turning capability. This enables the missile to immediately turn in ...


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