39

If you take out the political angle (which is by far, the most important), there are a number of reasons for this. Basically, the Russians have a serious image problem. Russian (and Soviet) aircraft have a reputation for poor quality, reliability and safety issues. This will take a long time to fix. In contrast, Japanese have no such problems (In fact, the ...


39

It's simple. Cheap (development costs amortized decades before) and reliable. They made money for airlines. Or, you know, they wouldn't have bought them. There's more to operating costs than fuel burn, and in any case, fuel prices in the mid 90s were cheaper than at any time since the 20s in constant dollars. Fuel was so cheap that Air Canada was ...


31

Two reasons: The airplane is extremely versatile, while having adequate performance, and is a good choice when a small airforce needs a do-everything airplane to replace multiple types. Being designed for carriers, it's overbuilt for normal land operations in many key areas, which means a longer airframe structural life in its much easier life landing on ...


30

When Lockheed built their L-1011 TriStar, they had one engine option, the Rolls-Royce RB211. RR did not deliver in time, and that has been attributed to the airplane's demise. Although the TriStar's design schedule closely followed that of its competitor, Douglas beat Lockheed to market by a year due to delays in powerplant development. So, having more ...


26

Engines require a significant amount of specialist maintenence through their life. This means that an airline must train technicians to work on each kind of engine it runs, and maintain stocks of spares for these engines. Engines must also be periodically returned to the manufacturer for rebuilding and refurbishment. Engines from the same manufacturer will ...


24

The life of an aircraft engine is measured in hours of operation since some major service was done to it. When looking at ads for planes there are three regulatory terms that you'll see in engine descriptions: New (TSN) This one is pretty self explanatory - A brand new engine, produced with all brand new parts that comes to you right from the factory (or an ...


23

Wanting to replace the Dassault Mirage III, and after considering multiple fighters from multiple nations, it boiled down to the F-16 and F/A-18. The F-16 had engine issues, inferior radar, no long-range missiles and BVR capability, single engine, and was technologically immature at the time. Note: There were concerns that the larger more sophisticated F-...


22

As you've guessed, there are two options: a ferry flight, or shipping the aircraft in a container. Ferry flights are quite common; the recent Cirrus ditching in the Pacific was a ferry flight to Hawaii. As well as planning a suitable route and dealing with permits and paperwork, refueling etc., the ferry company may install extra fuel tanks to give more ...


21

There are plenty of great $20,000 aircraft out there - the hard part is finding them. "What to look for" is an incredibly broad question, and varies substantially between different types of aircraft: You would not look for the same things on a Piper Comanche as you would on a Cessna 182. Accordingly the first thing you want to do is find a mechanic who is ...


16

With many airplanes the longevity of the engine is a major factor in the price of the aircraft. Piston aircraft engines are generally good for 2000 hours of operation before they need to be overhauled, which is almost always painfully expensive. The more life left on the engine the higher the value of the airplane. SMOH and SFOH both have to do with the time ...


16

Manufacturers typically plan their aircraft production well into the future, which includes having a buyer lined up for each aircraft, so they will know their position in the production line and have an anticipated date for delivery. An order means that the buyer has agreed to purchase a certain aircraft in the production line, at a certain price. The buyer ...


16

Selection of the replacement of the Mirage III was of course carefully considered by the RAAF, and the most suitable airframe was considered for the mission and circumstances typical for a vast, distant and sparsely populated continent: The fact that it was designed for carrier operation actually was a plus, since it results in a more robust airframe with ...


14

In the light aircraft world there are a few trade-offs to consider. The short version: Single-Engine Pros: Simplicity One engine means fewer controls, a simpler fuel system, simpler vacuum system, simpler electrical system, etc. Operational cost Only one engine to feed, so you spend less on - fuel & oil per flight. Maintenance cost Only one engine ...


11

I would imagine that there are factors like airline maintenance crew familiarity, national identity (think British Airways switching away from Rolls-Royce engines entirely to only GENX), and perceived vs. real engine reliability and long-term operational costs. There are carriers (and people, the current US president's personal plane being an example of ...


10

I'm going out a bit on a limb here, and it isn't specifically an answer to exactly what you are asking (which is what Stack Exchange tends to strive for), but I think this is the answer you need, so at the risk of receiving a couple of downvotes, here goes. engine was rebuilt 556 hours ago but was a problem because was never entered in the log books I ...


10

I assume you have a Mode S transponder. A Mode S transponder uses a unique 24 bit address assigned by the authorities to your aircraft to communicate with Mode S radars. If you do not have a Mode S transponder there is nothing that links your transponder to your aircraft registration. If you purchase an aircraft you need to register it with the Civil ...


10

Airlines don't want to buy "engines" at all. From the airlines' point of view, they are just horribly complicated things that they don't understand, and they don't want to spend their own money learning anything more than the information in the Pilot's Handbook! What airlines really want is "something to power their planes". These days, the engines are ...


9

Its surely possibly and there are a few things I can think of off hand, Missing Log Books: generally speaking if an aircraft is missing its log books you need to do quite a bit of tear down and rework on it to make it airworthy once again. In many cases the cost of this far out weighs the cost of a logbook/airworth plane so not always done. As such this ...


9

First, the airframe and systems were well-engineered and had few flaws and good aerodynamic qualities. Second, the cost to re-engine it with higher bypass ratio engines would have been high, and as such needed to be included in the cost-benefit analysis and balanced against the costs of operating the plane as-is with its original engines. The expected ...


8

This practice is really more of an accounting/finance question than an aviation one, but it's common enough that it's probably worth addressing here. When reviewing an aircraft's registration record you will frequently see the price on the FAA Aircraft Bill of Sale form given as "\$1.00 & OVC" (One dollar and Other Valuable Consideration) as shown on ...


8

I'll echo many of the sentiments that have already been expressed: There's a discrepancy between what the ad describes and what the mechanic's prebuy report describes, which indicates that either the ad is "hastily put together" or intentionally misleading (neither is good). Also the idea that an engine was "rebuilt" but never logged is a huge red flag. ...


7

You can often get to Reykavic airport in Iceland for crossing the Atlantic. If that hop is still too far you can install extra fuel tanks in the cargo hold and/or passenger area temporarily.


7

I think reputation has a lot to do with this, I'm sure there are Russian aircraft out there that have outstanding safety records, but media has focused on some high-profile accidents as well as shoddy/corrupt government. Also, certification is probably the other barrier, the bigger the aircraft the more expensive it is to certify it for various civil ...


6

There are lots of ways to go about this. Rent: as you have mentioned nearby FBO's have various planes although they are almost always Pipers (Warriors, Arrows, occasionally a Saratoga or Lance) or Cessnas since those are common trainers. You may also find a light twin here and there as well as a Grumman or something like that. In this case you can rent ...


6

You would have to provide more answers to the comment I made above. But for a relatively small payload (<4000lbs), I'd say you can't go wrong with a Cessna C208 Caravan. You can buy a good used C208B Super CargoMaster for just shy of $1 million. Another recommendation for that route would be the DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter. Payload is increased by ...


6

ymb1 answer is good. I would add that often there are political reasons: for example currently you cannot sell GE engine to any Russian company for the trade sanction beetween USA and Russia. If you sell an helicopter or airplane with your GE engine... you simply don't. The solution is to use another engine that is not made in USA.


6

There are a few reasons for this. First off they may not want the public, or more importantly potentially enemy nations obtaining a large quantity (or any quantity for that matter) of military planes. Even old war birds can still do a lot of damage if equipped by a person with intent on doing damage. Secondly, the boneyard you have pictured serves a few ...


6

Well, this is a much more opinion based answer, but I'll give it a go: Airworthiness Certificate (FAA link) Aircraft Maintenance logs (FAA link) (in particular engine overhaul - AOPA link) Much like a CarFax, check if it has been involved in any accidents (NTSB link, you can do a registration querry there) After that, I would say getting an independent ...


6

You need to be a bit more specific as "M20" refers to a lot of aircraft. An older M20C or M20D (with the fixed gear) should be quite manageable. An M20TN Acclaim is out of the question. Since you mention 60K I assume you are talking C/E variant but clocked out J's can be had for that. You can likely find an A/B but wooden wings are not for new owners or the ...


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