33

Every country handles aircraft registration differently (but generally similar). Im sure Boeing could tell you who they originally delivered the airframe to but if it was sold from there it could legally go anywhere and would only be subject to local registration legislation. Here in the US you can look up aircraft owners by N number but not all countries ...


31

All your plane's systems are happier when you're flying, including the pilot. Ideally, you'd fly often in order to keep your engine happy (distributing clean oil throughout the system to protect against corrosion and heating it enough to drive off water from the crankcase). As a rule of thumb Blackstone Labs (the oil analysis folks) consider piston engines "...


26

I've heard it said that the break-even point for owning vs renting is 200 hours/year. I fly a lot less than that, but I don't like sharing my toys, so I own anyway. I make it a point to not actually count my cost of ownership, because it wouldn't be fun any more, but I'll give you some rough numbers. I bought a 1962 Mooney for \$30,000. That's about as ...


18

The main thing to do is to realize why you're creating the corporation. We created a 501(c)7 (in the US) corporation which is a tax-exempt organization and falls under "social club." We did this to limit our personal liability. However, if you are creating the corporation to limit personal liability, you have to make sure to operate like a corporation - ...


15

You could, if the aircraft is available for sale somewhere, and there are no other legal compliance problems. Paul Allen has a nice collection of military aircraft at his Flying Heritage Collection, and there are certainly quite a few other people with both flyable and unflyable military aircraft. There are also private companies which will let you try out ...


13

A leaseback can be advantageous, especially when you use the aircraft for your own flight training and travel. But there are some things you need to watch out for: Other people will be using your aircraft - whether people admit it or not, nobody will take care of the plane as well as you do. If you think you might take issue with trash in the cockpit, a ...


11

I will mention some considerations that were not mentioned above. First of all, it does make sense to buy a plane for training, and it can save you a lot of money on rent but you need to be aware of what you are doing. The positive side is that airplanes do not depreciate as fast as most assets of their kind (it is not unheard of being able to sell an ...


11

There's certainly some missing details in that story. Two minutes with Google shows that (a) the prefix "TF" refers to Iceland, and (b) those three aircraft were most recently registered to Air Atlanta Icelandic, some sort of charter/cargo operator. What's missing from that news story is that surely the Malaysian authorities have already done the above, ...


10

The article in the Guardian said that they think they know who the owner is on paper, but that company isn't contactable. Taking out advertisements in major newspapers (within the same jurisdiction, then covered as news by the world's press) is likely to be a step towards giving due notice before reposessions proceedings can start, to give the real owner ...


10

The requirement for 100 hour inspections is probably the biggest regulatory/legal item you'll come up against. As for other regulatory items, there's some fuzz on the subject of whether providing the aircraft used in flight instruction and receiving compensation makes that aircraft "for hire" and triggers all the other FARs that come into play when ...


10

Depending on what country you live in, yes, but it will cost you. It's probably the cheapest to fly an airplane you own in the United States. Here, the answer is yes, with very little restriction, you can just drive out to the airport and fly an aircraft within the National Airspace System. You just must abide by the legal and medical requirements for you,...


9

I was in a club like that. The big advantage (for us) was that we didn't have to pay sales tax when buying or selling a share. The club owns the plane (& the tools & the engine reserve, etc) and you buy shares in the club. We had to have an annual meeting, officers, & file with the state. It wasn't a big deal.


8

Most of the liabilities (but not all) fall under the insurance of the aircraft. Your insurance policy is your largest liability. This is important not just for protection of your aircraft, but if your insurance ends up void in an incident, you could have a lawsuit on your hands. Don't assume that aviation insurance is similar to car insurance, either. ...


7

The key when selecting an aviation mechanic or shop to maintain your newly purchased plane is "time in type": You would not take a Cessna 172 to the United Airlines maintenance facility at JFK, not would you take an A380 to the local Cessna service center (even though it would be perfectly legal to do so). If you're buying a new aircraft (of any type) the ...


7

If I were you I'd only buy an airplane once I'd successfully got my license and flown enough to know what you want to own long-term. Once you know more about it you can make an informed decision. Also, you will be able to judge whether an airplane is worth buying, or whether you'll be inheriting a load of expensive problems. Owning an airplane is very ...


7

There are two assumptions in your questions which could be addressed. First, learning in the plane you'll be flying: it might also be useful to learn to adapt to different planes. Each plane is a bit different to control and not everything on the plane is standard across manufacturers. You might be better off starting to learn how to adapt your flying to ...


7

Aircraft insurance for personal aircraft is not legally required by any part of the US FARs, nor to my knowledge is it required by any state government, though I'm only familiar with New York in that regard. (As you'll note from the Wikipedia page you linked to, not all states require automobile insurance either, though most do now...) Aircraft insurance is ...


7

It partially depends on whether the military giving them up are willing to let the technology go. In the case of the F14 every single one had their engines and any novel systems destroyed completely after retirement to keep any parts from getting to Iran, which bought F14s before the revolution deposed the Shah. As for getting one most militaries go ...


7

This varies heavily by country, and I know some countries have almost no general or private aviation. But in the UK, USA, Australia, most of Europe etc yes owning a plane is almost like owning a car in terms of freedom to use it. Certainly in the UK, where I'm from, you can take off from a private strip in uncontrolled airspace with no radio and no flight ...


4

Yes and no. Yes it is possible to buy old military aircraft; they are frequently listed in the pages of aircraft sales periodicals like Controller, Trade-A-Plane, Barnstormers, etc. Popular piston engine military aircraft include the P-51 Mustang, AT-6 Harvard and T-28 Trojan. East Bloc jets like the L-39 and MiG-15 are also big sellers, due to their ...


4

I can only speak for commercial aviation, but in my experience, we generally have 100% RII buyback on initial AD compliance issues. For example, if we have to run a new wire bundle or reroute a wire bundle as part of an AD, it has to be "bought off" by either a QC inspector or an RII-qualified mechanic. In these situations, I would say that the work is done ...


4

Ground running your engine is not good for it. The objective is to get the oil hot enough to boil off any acidic water created by exhaust gas blow by (exhaust gas leaking around the piston rings and ending up in the crank case). The oil temp should get up to 180 degrees (measured at the temperature sensor) which means it is much hotter down in the ...


3

I have been looking into this recently and have some numbers on hand from people I have spoken to, I now fly out of KDYL but was perviously flying out KPNE, I always asked around for costs at both and this is what I found out. KDYL is a typical small strip in suburban PA, KPNE is a big airport in the northeast corner of Philadelphia (its not Philly ...


3

The first thing I would do is put on paper for your benefit what the mission is. Are you seeking a pilot career, or just want to fly for recreational purposes? How many people will you be carrying on a regular basis? How far away are the destinations? (Like from where you live to where your wife wants to go... New York City to the Cape Cod area, in my ...


3

I considered buying an airplane, I even came close but backed away because the particular airplane had some engine issues. In retrospect, it might have been cheaper to buy a plane at the start, but now I'm glad I didn't, primarily because the 150 I was looking at would not be a satisfying long-term airplane for my purposes. There is an advantage not ...


3

It's very, very easy to hire an aircraft mechanic. Drive to your local airport and explore the less-travelled roads beside the fence. You will find a number of maintenance facilities that can service anything from a Piper Cub to the Concorde. Walk in, say hello. Small exception: major international hubs tend to be air carrier only. General aviation will be ...


3

As Ben says, it depends a lot on which country you're in: Both due to natural differences in the cost of things (Germany is more expensive than, say, Vietnam for instance) but also because different countries have different requirements for how much experience you need before they hand you a license. But as an example let's go with the USA, based on the ...


3

In the US, you can pretty much legally fly your private plane whenever you want, as long as the ceiling and visibility are compatible with flight under Visual Flight Rules. If you have an instrument rating, then you have even more freedom, but you have to follow certain procedures in order to exercise that freedom.


2

This is what the FAR allows you to do as preventive maintenance if you are not a certified mechanic: (c) Preventive maintenance. Preventive maintenance is limited to the following work, provided it does not involve complex assembly operations: (1) Removal, installation, and repair of landing gear tires. (2) Replacing elastic shock ...


2

Along with other answers, here are my main points. I purchased a 2012 172 about 6 months ago, and it's been on leaseback for about 3. 1) Be seriously OK with some light cosmetic damage, and protect against it as best you can. People touch screens, and people sit on pens after writing down their clearances. Get some seat covers, screen protectors if it's a ...


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