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1

There are several considerations for flying polar routes, but no special modifications are necessarily needed. Navigation is different, as Lat/Lon (specifically longitude) converge to become meaningless close to poles, so aircraft traditionally use a grid navigation system. Aircrew should also be aware of the difference between magnetic and true north, as ...


0

Same principle in small aircraft as all aircraft control column locks hold them in place All explained above by other posts it is not a fashion or pilot habit it is part of post flight check list ensure control lock is in place


10

This is a safety feature. You don't want the airplane to blow over in a strong wind. With the elevators down (as you see them in the pictures), a gust from the front will push the plane's nose down and keep the main wing from generating lift. A gust from behind will push the nose up, but in this case, the main wing will present its top surface to the gust,...


18

@John K's answer is perfect. However, in other mechanical systems such as elevators, fork-lifts, factory machines, etc and also NON hydraulic systems (and also possibly Jets) it is designed to be so so that when the machine is idle/switched-off the system is in a 'non-stressed' state or in a 'safe state'. The keywords are 'design' and 'requirement'. As @...


54

It generally means that the hydraulic actuator (power control unit) driving the surface has an "idle" facility that allows fluid to move internally between the two sides of the actuator piston, or just circulate in the pressure/return lines, and when unpressurized it acts more or less like a hydraulic damper even though the input spool valve is at its "null" ...


-1

I don't know where you come up with these numbers. I'm a 20,000 corporate pilot and also an aircraft broker dealing in corporate aircraft sales. A Challenger 605 or 604 which is a 10 to 12 passage plane cost from \$120,000 up to \$180,000 for the better shops. I have had several painted over the years with recent quotes in the last 60 days in July 2019 and ...


9

I banged rivets on a production line in a previous life (in the 70s). A trick that works wonders (although it may be frowned upon by purists, and your school instructors may prevent you from using such a "cheat" while learning) until you get good at holding it perfectly perpendicular is to put a little piece of masking tape over the tip of the rivet snap. ...


5

The gear itself and its attachments being pretty beefy, you can't really damage the gear legs extending them at any speed the airplane can fly at. The limitations usually relate to the doors, which are more delicate, and having large surface area, are far more affected by air loads. So the main effect of exceeding a gear speed limitation is the risk of ...


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