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4

The problem with the MAX has nothing to do with the elevators being ineffective, the characteristics which lead to the pitching up will be present wherever you put the tail. It's the placement of the engines that are the problem. Moving the tail would require big changes, you have to strengthen the tail and structure around it, which would be extremely ...


9

No. A t-tail would worsen the characteristics of the airplane. While not necessarily a horrible idea in its own right, the already-nasty slow-flight/high alpha/stall characteristics of the aircraft that necessitated MCAS in the first place would make this idea dangerous. The pitch-up tendency could lead to a stall, which in a T-tail can lead to a deep stall. ...


21

According to this blog: Up until 1977, the FAA required all jets to be operated by two pilots. In ‘77, Cessna was given approval on a single-pilot variant of the Citation I, the Citation I-SP. The aircraft met the 12,500-pound maximum takeoff weight threshold for small aircraft, but that wasn’t the only single-pilot qualification. Cessna also had to ...


4

Since June 2011. EASA first proposed a change to CS 25.1322 in NPA 2009-12 (Notice of Proposed Amendment) in November 2009: CS-25 contains a certification specification (CS 25.1322) that dictates the colour of warning, caution, advisory, and other message lights that are installed as annunciation displays in the flight deck. As presently written, CS 25.1322 ...


0

If you are referring to a minimum weight requirement that the aircraft must be operated with after it has been certified (that must be submitted as part of the certification process), yes there is. For example, for my A330's Weight Variant, in the Airplane Flight Manual's Limitations chapter, while there is a Maximum Take Off Weight (MTOW) of 233,000 kg, ...


3

While there is a minimum weight to be defined as Transport Category, 12500 lbs for jets and 19 seats/19000 lbs for propeller driven airplanes, that's a "minimum maximum weight" you could say, to meet a category definition, which determines the certification standards you have to meet. There is no minimum weight for certification in any category. ...


0

The FAA doesn't require it, but some carburettor manufacturers may have them. You can get return springs for Rotax engines, but only for non-certified aircraft and then again only to prevent throttle creep


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