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12

Note that the 2.5 g limit is for load due to manoeuvring, not only for turbulence. The certification specification for large aircraft on the subject of turbulence and gusts has changed several times since the certification of the Boeing 707. Turbulence, and its effects on aircraft, is nowadays much better understood. Different aircraft react differently to ...


6

Resilient to turbulence could also mean that they don’t experience as much roughness when flying through turbulent air. The wing loading of the aircraft has much to do with this. Modern aircraft with more efficient wings and high loading ratios (kg/m2) will be ‘bashed about’ less than older aircraft with lower ratios. From your example the Fokker F27 has a ...


3

It depends on the interpretation of ‘resistant’. You’d home that problems like metal fatigue are better understood these days, and modern designs may deal with turbulence without exerting large g-forces. It’s difficult to imagine passengers being too happy with exposure to 2.5G so avoiding or mitigating such events has to be better than just making ...


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