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25

Aircraft carriers use a TACAN, which stands for Tactical Aid to Navigation. (The Navy is really good at making acronyms that don't follow normal conventions for abbreviation) Functionally the TACAN is like a VOR with DME, providing bearing to and from the ship, as well as range. The system is not susceptible to rocking motion, and least not perceptibly. (...


0

The break is a 180° turn from the upwind to the downwind in the landing pattern which allows for the separation of elements in a formation and spacing of individual aircraft for recovery. Typically the break (for a Case 1 recovery) occurs on the upwind leg at 800 ft AGL, 1 NM DME ahead of the ship, at 350 kts. The lead aircraft breaks formation, turning to ...


6

The "break" is where the aircraft enters the landing pattern. The aircraft carrier tries to time entries into the break such that aircraft are landing in 15-20 second intervals. Until you "break" you are in a holding pattern around the aircraft carrier. Entering the "break" is getting into the pattern to land. When they say "the break is level" it means the ...


11

"Level" isn't a noun here--it's not that the break is a level. Level is an adjective describing the kind of a turn. A break is a turn; that turn is a level turn (neither descending nor ascending), and a 180 degree turn, and it is made at 800 feet.


2

To add to the disadvantage of a drag chute. The now retired USCG HU-25 Guardian (military version of Dassault Falcon 20) had a drag chute attached to the tail cone for emergency landings or short runways. This was because the engines the coast guard used did not have reverse thrust capability. This drag chute was only effective to about 60 knots. It was ...


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