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92

Yes, The HMS M2 had a single seaplane aboard that it was capable of launching. Her 12-inch gun was removed, replaced by a small aircraft hangar, the work being completed in 1927. This could carry a small Parnall Peto seaplane, specially designed for the M2, which, once its wings had been unfolded, could be lowered onto the sea alongside by a ...


45

It's technical, not political The F-35 was an attempt to do exactly what you propose, lowering costs by planned sharing of 80% of parts across variants, but it turns out that the USN's F-35C costs over twice as much as the USAF's F-35A, and only shares 20-25% of it's parts. The project has been a disaster practically since day one, and the services are ...


40

Landing on "The Boat" Glossary Approach turn/ 180: The approach turn itself is a 180 degree turn (190 degrees at the boat because of the angled deck) that is usually broken down into 5 segments: the 180 position, the 135, the 90 (halfway through the turn), the 45 and the groove. Each respective position indicates the number of degrees left in the turn ...


39

That's a weight check. The sign has the weight of the aircraft in pounds. The catapult crew guy first shows the presumed weight to the PIC who must give a thumbs up, agreeing, "Yes, that is the weight I believe my aircraft to have." The crew guy must then show the same exact set of numbers to the catapult chief operator, who must also approve it: "Yes, the ...


37

The landing on carrier is indeed hard. The reason is not the deceleration (which is handled by the hook), but the touch-down. Since the deck is short, the wires can't be spaced very far apart, so the aircraft must touch down very precisely. Since the precision is better at steeper angle, the aircraft landing on carrier do not flare. At all. So they hit the ...


33

Computers can, in fact, control the approach of a Super Hornet all the way to touchdown. However, there are limits to the sea state. Gross deviations in glide path resulting from a pitching deck would make a coupled approach impractical. However, the most compelling reason to hand fly all our approaches is that we fly a $60 million jet. Murphy's Law tells ...


33

The Nimitz Class aircraft carriers are the largest warships ever built. With over 6,000 personnel (crew and aircrew), the carrier has a displacement of 102,000t, and a flight deck length of 332.9m. From: Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier - Naval Technology https://www.naval-technology.com/projects/nimitz/ 332.9m * 39 in/m * 1 ft/12in = 1081.9 ft. I think many ...


32

The Navy does have systems that are capable of guiding an airplane in for a landing, and some aircraft can use this system to land completely on the autopilot. However, the system has not always been reliable and still has its limits, and other reasons for not always using this system are similar to those for land-based aircraft. Further reasons for this ...


32

The answer is quite simple: 1. When touching down the nose is in a pulled up attitude, therefore the tail is farther down then normal. As soon as the airplane touches down (on all wheels), the tail is higher, thus the hook is higher. You can see how the aircraft is in a nose up attitude, but gear and hook are on the same level. If the aircraft was sitting ...


32

Farhan's answer covered why the deck is angled in the first place. As far as why the landing area of the deck points left instead of right, this is for several reasons: Angling to port makes the most use of the deck area behind the catapults. Angling starboard would require the catapults to be shifted left off the centerline of the carrier (yes, the carrier ...


29

A South Vietnamese Air Force Cessna O-1 landed on the USS Midway at the end of the Vietnam War. Fixed-wing VNAF aircraft usually flew to Thailand, and the naval evacuation was carried out by helicopter (with crews sometimes ditching in the water after the flight decks ran out of room), but this O-1 pilot wound up making his first carrier landing, with his ...


29

Most carrier-borne aircraft can't: they need (at a minimum) the arrestor wire system to be functional and set to the correct weight. As jwenting said, smaller aircraft may be able to. A C-130 Hercules famously landed on a carrier (without arrestor hook), but that may have required wind over the deck (i.e. the carrier steaming against the wind at high speed)...


27

Edit Since another user, with actual carrier experience, has given a detailed answer, please refer to his answer. It now appears that a good part of my answer was incorrect. As I wrote in the beginning, my answer was based on flight-sim experience, and reading, but nothing formal or official. I'll leave my answer up, solely for historical reference, ...


27

A classic 737 MAX landing weight is about 114,000# for a -300, less for a -500, more for a -400. But that is max. Down to "almost empty" gas tanks, knock another 8 or 10,000# off of that. Less than full pax/cargo load, several more thousand pounds off. With a stiff breeze, say 20 knots, plus the carrier at max speed, you have maybe 50 knots of headwind. ...


26

This kind of layout is called the angled flight deck (also called 'skewed' or 'canted' deck) and was first used by Royal Navy. There are a number of advantages to this layout compared to using the same direction of landing and takeoffs: It allows concurrent landings and takeoffs. By having an angled deck, the aircraft which fail to connect (with the ...


26

Also consider the Japanese I-400 class submarine, that carried three Aichi M6A Serian bombers. Probably the most advanced aircraft carrying submarines ever built. They entered service too late to have any meaningful impact, but the engineering that went into them was amazing for its time. Just designing a submarine that could carry a watertight aircraft ...


24

They can climb vertically, but this works best if they are several tons below their maximum take-off mass. Fighter jet engines need a lot of fuel, and at the beginning of the flight the aircraft will be too heavy for vertical climb. Also, the landing gear would need to be rearranged if the plane is to take off from any airport. Even a thrust/weight ratio ...


24

Why is the deck of an aircraft carrier angled to the left? Because the island is on the right. Why is the island on the right? Because studies on the HMS Furious showed that pilots tended to turn left during an aborted landing.


22

All VTOL's (Vertial takeoff or landing) planes will be able to land on an abandoned carrier, as they need a vastly reduced runway; it would be a bit like landing a helicopter. They will do so though at the cost of a huge amount of fuel and coolant; which may mean that they could struggle to do a return trip if they can't refuel.


21

An angled flight deck resolves many problems identified during WWII with carrier combat and flight operations (in addition to some of the other issues related to jet aircraft). The first relates to the importance of not having a crash landing stop flight operations (or wreck staged/landed planes). For example, straight deck carriers often recovered planes ...


20

As Lnafziger says, a conventional landing is impossible for anything more than a tiny aircraft STOL aircraft (Carrier 'runway' length: 200m). As you state however, if it was an emergency, the aircraft carrier has a special net which it can fold up to stop planes, and since it can stop an F18 Hornet, it could probably take your Cessna as well :)


19

The official name is a Jet Blast Deflector. As the name suggests, they direct the fast-moving and hot air from the jet engines upwards. This protects the personnel and equipment behind the departing aircraft from getting blown around or damaged from the jet blast. Because of the high temperature of the jet blast, they may have active cooling systems, and ...


19

As far as I'm aware this has never been attempted (and I doubt the Navy would let me try - though I'm certainly game if they are!), but: A Piper J3 Cub stalls at 38mph (33kts). The USS Enterprise (CVN-65) had a maximum speed of 38.7mph (33.6kts). So, given a lightly loaded cub and an Enterprise-class carrier at flank speed, it is at least theoretically ...


19

Because it is the standard operating procedure, not only for this aircraft, but also for others. In the book U.S. Naval Air Superiority: Development of Shipborne Jet Fighters - 1943-1962, [Tommy H. Thomason notes](By Tommy H. Thomason): Leaving the canopy open for landings and takeoffs would still be standard for many years as it facilitated egress in the ...


18

Depends what's on the deck Carriers often stuff the deck with aircraft, or have the deck disrupted for other reasons. If the evacuation interrupted an evolution when the deck was cluttered or in repair, they may have just left it that way, and you could have a much smaller space to land in. Also, the evacuating forces are not fools. They will have made ...


17

There are a few differences in landing on an aircraft carrier versus on the ground. I've got no carrier (or military) experience so I can't really speak to the checklists, except to say that they would be slightly different for each aircraft, but it's a subject that's interesting to me so I've done a little digging over the years. These are the differences ...


17

In general, land based aircraft do not lend themselves well to carrier conversion. On the other hand, conversion in opposite direction is (relatively) easy, as shown by F-4 and F-18. Conversion of aircraft to carrier use require a number of modifications: Tail hook has to added and rear fuselage reinforced for arrested landings. Landing gear has to be ...


17

If you allow "airplane" = "unmanned aircraft"...then, jets! There was Regulus 1 Submarine testing was performed from 1947 to 1953 at the Navy's facility at Naval Air Station Point Mugu, with USS Cusk (SS-348) and USS Carbonero (SS-337) converted as test platforms, initially carrying the missile unprotected, thus unable to submerge until after ...


17

The YF-17 is the answer to your question. It is the predecessor to the F/A-18, and was designed as a land-based fighter. The YF-17 is much lighter than the F/A-18, because it does not need to carry equipment for carrier landings. Adding this equipment makes the aircraft heavier, compromising performance. You then need to compensate for the added weight, but ...


16

No, the hook is not capable of catching more than a single wire at a time. There is a hydraulic dampener in the hook, the snubber, that keeps the hook pressed into the deck during touchdown. This was designed to help alleviate a phenomenon known as hook skip bolters, when the force of the hook contacting the deck causes the hook to bounce; however, the ...


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