35

The A380 that was being scrapped was the 3rd aircraft on the production line. After being used for a short time in the test fleet of Airbus, it became the first line number that was delivered to a customer. (Line No. 1 and 2 are still owned by Airbus). The first few aircraft leaving a new production line are usually heavier and have different wiring than ...


31

No they are nowhere near being worn out. These aircraft are normally designed for anywhere from 40-60,000 cycle lifespans, and more on shorter haul a/c (depending on how long each cycle is), perhaps 30-40 years. They are being retired and scrapped because they make no economic sense to run, and there is literally no used market for them, so the residual ...


24

In all Airbuses auto-braking system aims for specific deceleration. Once the design target has been reached, the system does not apply more brake pressure although there usually is more available. So, if you apply thrust reverser with autobrake selected it will apply less pressure on wheel brakes and as the target deceleration remains the same, the stopping ...


16

They are indeed the Ram Air Outlet Doors. (source, showing Ram Air Inlet (RAI) and Ram Air Outlets (RAO)) From the A380 FCOM (21 - Air Conditioning): PACK DESCRIPTION The hot bleed air flows into each pack, via the two pack valves, then enters the heat exchanger. This heat exchanger precools the air using external air. This external air enters ...


16

First, my experience was with 747-100/200 aircraft. However, I'm reasonably certain that the subsequent variants of the 747 would perform just as well, and I would be surprised if the A380 did not as well. If during cruising with full load.... "Full load" is a little ambiguous. If what is meant is MTOW (max takeoff weight), note that by the time you ...


13

The Airbus A380 comes with two engine choices: Rolls-Royce Trent 900 Engine Alliance GP7000 The thrust reversers are not part of the core engines. The reversers are developed by the company which produces the engine nacelle, in this case Safran Nacelles. They developed nacelles for both engine variants for the A380, including the first electrically ...


12

On a non-FADEC engine (older airplanes - not this one) where the thrust levers are connected to the engine fuel control units with a cable circuit or a teleflex cable, you have to manually adjust each lever to wherever it has to go to achieve a given N1 (fan speed), and this can result in small variations in position of each lever when all engines are at the ...


11

Many of the A380s due to be scrapped in the next few years are coming up on their first D-check (very heavy) maintenance, which is very expensive. They will also need their interiors updated, also quite expensive. Most airlines decided it just wasn't worth it to keep flying these things with these costly operations coming up, for an already economically ...


10

Airbus originally planned on a freighter version and UPS and FedEx both ordered some of them. Production delays with the passenger version resulted in the freighter version being delayed and both of them canceling their orders. The main issue why there is no freighter version is that the internal volume of the aircraft is too large to make it economical for ...


10

The ability to restart production depends on: is the tooling still available? Aircraft production uses giant jigs for production of the fuselage and wings. Sometimes these are stored when production ends (I've been in a hangar full of stored Airbus jigs), but sometimes they are scrapped. is production space available? An A380 needs lots of space in the ...


7

This is a very hypothetical question. If the aircraft has no means to slow down it has to lose all kinetic energy through rolling friction and air resistance. Both of these are very small (and get smaller as the aircraft gets slower) and will not have too much effect on a heavy aircraft like the A380 with an enormous amount of kinetic energy. Therefore the ...


7

Airlines normally maintain what are called Engine Build Units (EBUs) in their spare engine pool. The engine will be pre-assembled up to the point where variations in position on-wing have to be accounted for. Components beyond that point are only installed at the time the engine is installed on-wing. Designers try to minimize engine "handing", mirror ...


5

No, the thrust levers are not automatically synchronized. You could set one engine to 100% and the other to full reverse thrust, just by moving the levers. Having said that, there are some airplanes that kind of do what you're talking about. For instance, most Airbus designs have detents in the throttle position which basically tell the computer to take ...


5

These are the EFIS CP (EFIS Control Panels) for the captain's and First Officer ND's (respectively). For example, clicking on the ARPT button will display airports on the relevant ND (Navigation Display, the right part of the left screen, or the left part of the right screen in the image you provided). It's pretty clear in this close-up photo. You can see ...


5

The A380 has an optional system called Brake-To-Vacate (BTV) which allows the flight crew to calculate required runway length and determine which runway exit they can make before starting descent. Once engaged, the pilot just has to put the aircraft on the runway and BTV takes over, applying spoilers and thrust reversers ahead of brakes to achieve the ...


4

There's more weight on the main gear when the aircraft pushes back from the ramp and is taxiing than on the takeoff roll, due to the lift generated from the wings. When the aircraft rotates the higher angle of attack generates enough lift to 'offset' the aircrafts weight and it takes off. The most weight a main gear set will take will be on a firm landing at ...


4

Terry already provided the practical side! A similar question was asked already, regarding the Airbus A380. Thanks to DeltaLima: https://aviation.stackexchange.com/a/11583/1084 Basically it is a requirement for certification, that a B747, A380 or A340 is still flyable with two engines off.


3

It depends In practice, it would keep on rolling (as TomMcW summarises it) "until it hits something". It will run into something before it stops of its own accord. How far it would roll if there were nothing in the way depends on a lot of things, some of which are discussed below. Real-life or idealised conditions? Are you asking about an idealised ...


3

They are likely attach points for safety harness equipment. Workers working on top of the wing attach gear that functions as anchors for lines that run the length of the wing, then attach their safety harness to the line.


3

None of the 16 exits are hatches. All 16 have identical operation. From the A380 FCOM: The aircraft has 16 passenger doors (...) The doors open forward. The opening/locking of the door is performed mechanically by moving the door handle. In normal operation, the door revolves electrically by pressing the OPEN pb, or the CLOSE pb. In emergency operation, ...


3

One need to take into the equation, that this particular frame was MSN003, so one of those affected by the wiring disaster and other teething troubles of the early manufactured models, which substantially increases maintenance costs. Dr. Peters Group says "we did not find a buyer" and this might be the root cause. The plane has larger value as spare part ...


3

Well, the article you are referring to quite clearly states the reason for the decision to scrap the plane(s): negotiations with airlines to sell or lease were not successfull, so the only option was to scrap, or rather dismantle the plane. Furthermore, the article presents the estimate by Dr. Peters Group that it would be able to generate some \$45 million ...


2

Yes there is a penalty to pay if you break the lease contract by returning it before the completion date. Same as a car. It may be that they simply continue the lease payments to the end of the contract, or the contract may have some kind not-quite-so-bad penalty that was negotiated to sweeten the deal for the airline to get the deal in the first place. ...


2

A VFG on a A350 (Variable Freq Generator) ranges from 360Hz to 800Hz (idle to takeoff) but it weighs less than a traditional IDG or CDS due to the fact that it has less components inside since it does not need to convert the freq to a fixed 400Hz. Most components that use AC convert the variable frequency to a fixed 400Hz anyway. The output of the ...


2

I don't have the numbers for the A380 but have some for the Dreamliner. On a typical flight a Dreamliner will record about a half a terabyte of data: This level of operational insight will involve generating large amounts of data from each 787 aircraft, he explained. “We can get upwards of half a terabyte of data from a single flight from all of the ...


1

Let's suppose we had to convert a commercial aircraft to an all electric craft tomorrow and use all the available parts, batteries, thrust devices and airframes becoming available, as well as take off and land on conventional runways, with a typical payload etc, would this thing fly? This amount of specificity makes what would normally be pretty silly into ...


1

The A380 airport planning manual states (emphasis mine): Refuel pressure: - Maximum pressure: 50 psi (3.45 bar). Can it be safely increased? Doubtful. Any increase may damage internal aircraft systems, and not only that, the operators will need to ask the airports to install new refueling systems. Generally: For pressure refueling, a high-pressure ...


1

It would certainly be physically possible to do so. The open question is how much it would cost and how much it's worth to carriers. Airbus did promote the A380F Freighter as a possible application, and it was available for orders at one point. However, while the aircraft has much more volume than others (like a 747), it does not lift proportionally that ...


1

Normally the retrofitting path is from passenger service to freight service. In my experience, many freight operations already have the necessary airpacs, as certain cargo (zoo animals, livestock, biologicals and chemicals) may require environmental control. The cost comes in outfitting the aircraft for people, with the accouterments of modern air travel. ...


1

Aeroalias answer already covers most points. Still it may be worth to add that its not a clear gull wing, but more toward a dihedral setup with an increased volume at the front root part. This is most obvious when looking at it from the back while flying. There are not many pictures showing one flying and from behind but this (taken from Wikipedia) might ...


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