35

The A380 that was being scrapped was the 3rd aircraft on the production line. After being used for a short time in the test fleet of Airbus, it became the first line number that was delivered to a customer. (Line No. 1 and 2 are still owned by Airbus). The first few aircraft leaving a new production line are usually heavier and have different wiring than ...


31

No they are nowhere near being worn out. These aircraft are normally designed for anywhere from 40-60,000 cycle lifespans, and more on shorter haul a/c (depending on how long each cycle is), perhaps 30-40 years. They are being retired and scrapped because they make no economic sense to run, and there is literally no used market for them, so the residual ...


16

They are indeed the Ram Air Outlet Doors. (source, showing Ram Air Inlet (RAI) and Ram Air Outlets (RAO)) From the A380 FCOM (21 - Air Conditioning): PACK DESCRIPTION The hot bleed air flows into each pack, via the two pack valves, then enters the heat exchanger. This heat exchanger precools the air using external air. This external air enters ...


14

The Airbus A380 comes with two engine choices: Rolls-Royce Trent 900 Engine Alliance GP7000 The thrust reversers are not part of the core engines. The reversers are developed by the company which produces the engine nacelle, in this case Safran Nacelles. They developed nacelles for both engine variants for the A380, including the first electrically ...


12

On a non-FADEC engine (older airplanes - not this one) where the thrust levers are connected to the engine fuel control units with a cable circuit or a teleflex cable, you have to manually adjust each lever to wherever it has to go to achieve a given N1 (fan speed), and this can result in small variations in position of each lever when all engines are at the ...


11

Many of the A380s due to be scrapped in the next few years are coming up on their first D-check (very heavy) maintenance, which is very expensive. They will also need their interiors updated, also quite expensive. Most airlines decided it just wasn't worth it to keep flying these things with these costly operations coming up, for an already economically ...


8

Airlines normally maintain what are called Engine Build Units (EBUs) in their spare engine pool. The engine will be pre-assembled up to the point where variations in position on-wing have to be accounted for. Components beyond that point are only installed at the time the engine is installed on-wing. Designers try to minimize engine "handing", mirror ...


5

No, the thrust levers are not automatically synchronized. You could set one engine to 100% and the other to full reverse thrust, just by moving the levers. Having said that, there are some airplanes that kind of do what you're talking about. For instance, most Airbus designs have detents in the throttle position which basically tell the computer to take ...


5

These are the EFIS CP (EFIS Control Panels) for the captain's and First Officer ND's (respectively). For example, clicking on the ARPT button will display airports on the relevant ND (Navigation Display, the right part of the left screen, or the left part of the right screen in the image you provided). It's pretty clear in this close-up photo. You can see ...


4

Well, the article you are referring to quite clearly states the reason for the decision to scrap the plane(s): negotiations with airlines to sell or lease were not successfull, so the only option was to scrap, or rather dismantle the plane. Furthermore, the article presents the estimate by Dr. Peters Group that it would be able to generate some \$45 million ...


3

One need to take into the equation, that this particular frame was MSN003, so one of those affected by the wiring disaster and other teething troubles of the early manufactured models, which substantially increases maintenance costs. Dr. Peters Group says "we did not find a buyer" and this might be the root cause. The plane has larger value as spare part ...


2

Yes there is a penalty to pay if you break the lease contract by returning it before the completion date. Same as a car. It may be that they simply continue the lease payments to the end of the contract, or the contract may have some kind not-quite-so-bad penalty that was negotiated to sweeten the deal for the airline to get the deal in the first place. ...


1

Normally the retrofitting path is from passenger service to freight service. In my experience, many freight operations already have the necessary airpacs, as certain cargo (zoo animals, livestock, biologicals and chemicals) may require environmental control. The cost comes in outfitting the aircraft for people, with the accouterments of modern air travel. ...


1

There are some airplanes from the 1920s that have no vertical stabilizer because the rectangular shape of their fuselage provided enough vertical stabillity. They were less manouverable but enough for the epoch. One example is the Fokker FII.


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