35

There are 2 main reasons: The wing spars run through that area. If you wanted to keep the wing spar within the oval cross-section, you'd have to install the wing much higher on the fuselage which means the wing spar goes through the passenger cabin. Behind the wing spars, the landing gear is stored. The flat bottom provides more internal space. Another ...


35

The A380 that was being scrapped was the 3rd aircraft on the production line. After being used for a short time in the test fleet of Airbus, it became the first line number that was delivered to a customer. (Line No. 1 and 2 are still owned by Airbus). The first few aircraft leaving a new production line are usually heavier and have different wiring than ...


31

No they are nowhere near being worn out. These aircraft are normally designed for anywhere from 40-60,000 cycle lifespans, and more on shorter haul a/c (depending on how long each cycle is), perhaps 30-40 years. They are being retired and scrapped because they make no economic sense to run, and there is literally no used market for them, so the residual ...


14

Hobbes' reply has some of the main reasons, but there's some more: That flat bit is called the "belly fairing", and its functions are: Avoid some aerodynamically awkward corners that would happen if the wing profile just went straight through the fuselage, with no rounded corners etc. at the intersection. This is particularly useful at the wing ...


11

Many of the A380s due to be scrapped in the next few years are coming up on their first D-check (very heavy) maintenance, which is very expensive. They will also need their interiors updated, also quite expensive. Most airlines decided it just wasn't worth it to keep flying these things with these costly operations coming up, for an already economically ...


5

These are the EFIS CP (EFIS Control Panels) for the captain's and First Officer ND's (respectively). For example, clicking on the ARPT button will display airports on the relevant ND (Navigation Display, the right part of the left screen, or the left part of the right screen in the image you provided). It's pretty clear in this close-up photo. You can see ...


4

Well, the article you are referring to quite clearly states the reason for the decision to scrap the plane(s): negotiations with airlines to sell or lease were not successfull, so the only option was to scrap, or rather dismantle the plane. Furthermore, the article presents the estimate by Dr. Peters Group that it would be able to generate some \$45 million ...


3

One need to take into the equation, that this particular frame was MSN003, so one of those affected by the wiring disaster and other teething troubles of the early manufactured models, which substantially increases maintenance costs. Dr. Peters Group says "we did not find a buyer" and this might be the root cause. The plane has larger value as spare part ...


2

Yes there is a penalty to pay if you break the lease contract by returning it before the completion date. Same as a car. It may be that they simply continue the lease payments to the end of the contract, or the contract may have some kind not-quite-so-bad penalty that was negotiated to sweeten the deal for the airline to get the deal in the first place. ...


1

There are some airplanes from the 1920s that have no vertical stabilizer because the rectangular shape of their fuselage provided enough vertical stabillity. They were less manouverable but enough for the epoch. One example is the Fokker FII.


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