35

The A380 that was being scrapped was the 3rd aircraft on the production line. After being used for a short time in the test fleet of Airbus, it became the first line number that was delivered to a customer. (Line No. 1 and 2 are still owned by Airbus). The first few aircraft leaving a new production line are usually heavier and have different wiring than ...


31

No they are nowhere near being worn out. These aircraft are normally designed for anywhere from 40-60,000 cycle lifespans, and more on shorter haul a/c (depending on how long each cycle is), perhaps 30-40 years. They are being retired and scrapped because they make no economic sense to run, and there is literally no used market for them, so the residual ...


11

Many of the A380s due to be scrapped in the next few years are coming up on their first D-check (very heavy) maintenance, which is very expensive. They will also need their interiors updated, also quite expensive. Most airlines decided it just wasn't worth it to keep flying these things with these costly operations coming up, for an already economically ...


3

One need to take into the equation, that this particular frame was MSN003, so one of those affected by the wiring disaster and other teething troubles of the early manufactured models, which substantially increases maintenance costs. Dr. Peters Group says "we did not find a buyer" and this might be the root cause. The plane has larger value as spare part ...


3

Well, the article you are referring to quite clearly states the reason for the decision to scrap the plane(s): negotiations with airlines to sell or lease were not successfull, so the only option was to scrap, or rather dismantle the plane. Furthermore, the article presents the estimate by Dr. Peters Group that it would be able to generate some \$45 million ...


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